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Jaymes

Stifado -- Greek Beef Stew

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So I'm having a dinner party. Serving Stifado. It's quite highly spiced, with vinegar, cinnamon, cloves. Recipe follows.

Which red wine would y'all recommend using in the preparation?

And which to serve?

Greek Beef Stew (Stifado)

1/4 C olive oil

2 lbs beef stew meat

2 lbs white or yellow onions

1 C dry red wine

1 can tomatoes, undrained

3 T vinegar

2 t salt

1 stick cinnamon

4 whole cloves

1 tsp sugar

In Dutch Oven or stew pot, brown cubed stew meat in olive oil. Cut onions into quarters and add to pot. Break up canned tomatoes and add with juices to pot. Add all remaining ingredients. Simmer, covered, on low heat or in slow oven until beef is tender and all flavors are well combined.


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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The vinegar and tomatoes rule out anything fancy or subtle. I'd probably reach for a warm-climate red. Two Greek wines that'd do the trick are the Rispani Reserve from Tsantalis (a blend of native varieties) and the pricier Domaine Gerovassillou (a blend of syrah, merlot and grenache). Sicily makes several wines that would probably work (Ulysse from the slopes of Mt. Etna is a fave) as would the Umbrian Vitiano (a merlot-based blend). Côtes-du-Rhône (and their New World imitators) are extremely versatile and pair nicely with spices. Switching hemispheres, I might incline toward a pinotage.

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Off subject a little but try using shallots instead of onions. V tasty, mmmm.

Two pounds of shallots? :huh: Seriously?

Not to mention that I'm doubling the recipe. Jeez, I'd be peeling and chopping shallots for weeks. :biggrin:


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Bandol Rouge.


We cannot employ the mind to advantage when we are filled with excessive food and drink - Cicero

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Why not a tasty little Greek Xynomavro which I find to be reminiscent of a Pinot on steroids: a little less nuance, a little more muscle, but a similar (and appropriate to the dish) taste.

Edited to add that my wife reminds me that she just made a stifado with lamb shanks the other weekend. If memory serves, a Xynomavro would have been a perfect accompaniment as -- to my thuggish palate, anyway -- it plays off the cinnamon and clove quite well. There are some mid-priced brands imported into the U.S. which are something of a bargain.

Whatever wine you chose, Jaymes, the stew is delicious.

BTW, the Greeks produce a tasty little muscat dessert wine on the Island of Samos which, if you can find it, is dirt cheap compared to most other stickies, and quite drinkable.


I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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All the above wines sound pretty good matches. Look at a rich Cannonau from Sardina as well.

Cheers,

Stephen

Vancouver


"who needs a wine list when you can get pissed on dessert" Gordon Ramsey Kitchen Nightmares 2005

MY BLOG

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I want to thank all of you that responded. I'm going to print this topic, and take it with me to my local wine shop tomorrow.

Again, thanks.


I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Cut the heads and tails from the shallots then put in a bowl and cover with boiling water for 1 minute then the skins should come off real easy. Its important to saute the onions enough to give them a good caramelised colour. Hope that helps. P.s., shin of beef is a really good cut to cook this with.

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