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dumplings, wontons and noodles


eatingwitheddie
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I have just been reading about those referred to as "soup dumplings". The book claims that these are soup contained within the dumpling , rather than dumplings to be cooked in a bowl of soup.

Any thoughts from the group on this?

s

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I have just been reading about those referred to as "soup dumplings". The book claims that these are soup contained within the dumpling , rather than dumplings to be cooked in a bowl of soup.

Any thoughts from the group on this?

Yes, xiaolongbaos are soup dumplings...containing soup INSIDE rather than dumplings cooked in soup. I want some! :sad: Guess I will have to try and make them myself.

The soup inside is a piece of jellied broth that liquidfies when the dumpling is steamed.

Laksa's list really throws the term dumpling into a quandary...When I think about dumplings, I think of xiaolongbao, har gow, siu mai, anything steamed. But then, steamed and panfried potstickers? I suppose everything else that is not steamed is just classified as "dim sum"? :blink::wacko:

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Dejah, wouldn't you agree that boiled jiaozi are also dumplings?

Wait till we start discussing what a "noodle" is.  :smile:

Oivey! Aiyeah! Dah say nay! Decisions, decisions...

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Thanks to Laksa for the informative threads on the soup dumplings and Dejah for more confirmation of what I've been eating.

Damn, they are good. Packed fresh frozen in a 94 count bag (if I recall correctly), two of us devoured the entire bag over a couple of hours. So easy when they taste that good, plus curiousity also kept us eating so we could gauge how much soup was in each one.

Will be going back for more.

S

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Even though the name for Shanghainese juicy buns, xiaolongbao , contains the Chinese word for bun (bao), it's technically not a bun -- the dough is not leavened. It's really a dumpling. Sometimes it's called xiaolongtangbao (tang meaning soup)

Of course, if you've seen it or eaten it, there wouldn't be any doubt in your mind that it's a dumpling and not a bun. However, I have seen actual buns (typically mini buns) in the U.S. labeled as xiaolongbao, so bear that in mind when shopping.

Definitely not a bun. The amazing thing about these dumplings was once I steamed them, they had a ridge at the bottom of them that contained the juice - some more than others. I was told by the maker that I was to make a little hole in the side, let it cool off a bit and drink the juice before eating the dumpling.

Dumplings. One of life's little miracles.

Thanks everybody for all your insights.

s

<<<<<<I was told by the maker that I was to make a little hole in the side, let it cool off a bit and drink the juice before eating the dumpling.>>>>>>

You mean you are supposed to ?WAIT? I want that gravy, and "I want it as soon as the dumpling is in my spoon! LOL!

I don't care what the terms are for dumplings and buns and bready stuff. If it is made with dough, leavened or unleavened, if it is steamed/boiled/fried --- whatever ---- I want it! And I don't even want a dip for it! Just the way it comes out of the steam/water/pan --- whatever ---- is fine with me!

Some supermarkets are making these little tiny oval shaped jiaozi. I bought some and planned to serve them as potstickers, for a gathering. But they didn't stay in place in the pan, so I stir/fried them, then added some broth with flavorings (a la Hugh Carpenter's Santa Barbara pot stickers) let them re-brown, and served them in a bowl. They were a big hit!

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The soup dumpling thread provided by Laksa shows an excellent photo by Tepee.

Could we safely say that the soup dumpling has that ridge around the bottom exactly like the ones I polished off the other day?

Thanks HZrt8w for the blog on Hong Kong dim sum - indeed the Har gow are exquisite. Is this dumpling porn at its finest?

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Has anyone made the xiaolongbaos ? Tepee?

I would like some feedback, then maybe I will attempt them.

I have some rich stock, both pork and chicken in the freezer, so, any insight and instructions would be most appreciated.

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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:wub:  :wub: The har gow is so beautiful in its translucency, almost transparent! Sigh. :wub:

Any suggestions as to how to get that translucent skin? My wraps are thin, but never that translucent! :shock: Would it have anything to do with the flour mixture?

Mine is prepackaged wheat starch and a couple tablespoons of potato starch.

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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:wub:  :wub: The har gow is so beautiful in its translucency, almost transparent! Sigh. :wub:

Any suggestions as to how to get that translucent skin? My wraps are thin, but never that translucent! :shock: Would it have anything to do with the flour mixture?

I think it's probably the flour mixture used. Would tapioca starch make it more translucent?

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Has anyone made the xiaolongbaos ? Tepee?

I would like some feedback, then maybe I will attempt them.

Nope, never made them. Cook-off, Sue-On?

That wrapper in the pic looked incredible, doesn't it?

Edited by Tepee (log)

TPcal!

Food Pix (plus others)

Please take pictures of all the food you get to try (and if you can, the food at the next tables)............................Dejah

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Has anyone made the xiaolongbaos ? Tepee?

I would like some feedback, then maybe I will attempt them.

Nope, never made them. Cook-off, Sue-On?

That wrapper in the pic looked incredible, doesn't it?

Don't rush me! Ah'm thinking! Ah'm thinking! :angry::biggrin:

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Has anyone made the xiaolongbaos ? Tepee?

I would like some feedback, then maybe I will attempt them.

Nope, never made them. Cook-off, Sue-On?

That wrapper in the pic looked incredible, doesn't it?

Don't rush me! Ah'm thinking! Ah'm thinking! :angry::biggrin:

I know I know... you just want another cook-off. Just come out and say it. Just come out and do it. :laugh::laugh:

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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Any suggestions as to how to get that translucent skin? My wraps are thin, but never that translucent! :shock:  Would it have anything to do with the flour mixture?

Mine is prepackaged wheat starch and a couple tablespoons of potato starch.

Maybe we are all just guessing. My guess is to use more oil to make it translucent?

I had made har gow a few time... but long time ago. I only used wheat starch and boiling hot water without any other mix. The result was pretty good. Emphasize that the water needs to be boiling, and you pour the water onto the wheat starch in a mixing bowl. A bit hard to work with because it's so hot.

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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I too use boiling water, and man! it's hard on the hands!

I don't use oil in my dough. It won't stick together when you try to pleat and seal.

We need "project" here to tell us how his experiments worked. Remember project and his methodology? :laugh::laugh: I felt like a pretzel after reading his instructions of this corner to that angle to this quardrangle to that point of intersection! :wacko:

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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We need "project" here to tell us how his experiments worked. Remember project and his methodology? :laugh:  :laugh: I felt like a pretzel after reading his instructions of this corner to that angle to this quardrangle to that point of intersection! :wacko:

Oh, Dejah, you are asking for it.....

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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I too use boiling water, and man! it's hard on the hands!

I don't use oil in my dough. It won't stick together when you try to pleat and seal.

We need "project" here to tell us how his experiments worked. Remember project and his methodology? :laugh:  :laugh: I felt like a pretzel after reading his instructions of this corner to that angle to this quardrangle to that point of intersection! :wacko:

(shhhhhhh!)

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WHO IS THIS PROJECT WONDER???

Must be before my time. I'm still a young 'un. :rolleyes:

I can't believe you weren't part of the "project".

Go back to page 3 and check out the Steamed dumpling thread. I dare ya! :raz:

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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