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dumplings, wontons and noodles


eatingwitheddie
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Strictly speaking, a snack can be "anything" that you eat, but it generally implies informal or hurried setting, or food. Something less than a "full" meal eaten between the"normal" three.

There is no loss in translation.

Nuances, my dears, nuances.

Dear Ben Sook,

Have you been using Wikipedia like the young'uns? :wink::laugh:

Dejah

www.hillmanweb.com

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Well, the book consists of recipes for dim sum, and I think the title was a result of "lost in translation".  :wink:

My understanding is that while Cantonese folks refer to the dishes served at tea as "dim sum," to Northerners "dim sum" has a meaning more akin to "snacks," hence the translation.

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My view of hor fun is that for the stir-fried version (chow fun), it is quite substantial and is more a meal in itself, lunch or dinner. The soup version (tang fun) could be a "snack" or a meal, depending on the individual. At least 2 bowls of it would definitely make a meal.

One dish or even two dishes of dim sum can hardly make a meal.

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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My view of hor fun is that for the stir-fried version (chow fun), it is quite substantial and is more a meal in itself, lunch or dinner.  The soup version (tang fun) could be a "snack" or a meal, depending on the individual.  At least 2 bowls of it would definitely make a meal.

One dish or even two dishes of dim sum can hardly make a meal.

Picky picky!! :raz:

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  • 3 months later...

I found this recipe. I might try it out later.

Fresh Rice Sheets For Noodles Or Wrappers

From: Southeast Asian Cooking by Jay Harlow

Yield: 8 Sheets

1 cup rice flour

5 tbsp tapioca starch *

4 tbsp wheat starch *

1 tsp kosher salt

2 cups water; plus

2 tb water

5 tsp oil

oil to grease pans

Combine rice flour, tapioca starch, wheat starch, salt and water and stir until smooth. Strain batter through a fine strainer and stir in 5 teaspoons oil. Let batter rest 30 minutes. Lightly oil a baking sheet and two 8x8 inch or 9x9 inch square cake pans. Place a steaming rack in a wok and add water to just below rack. Bring to a boil and have additional boiling water ready to replenish steamer. Stir batter very well and pour enough into one of the cake pans to cover bottom, about 1/2 cup. Set pan on steaming rack, cover wok, and steam 5 minutes. Remove lid, being careful not to let condensed water drip on rice sheet. (A tea towel can be placed over pan before covering wok) Remove cake pan; cool in a sink or lager pan filled with 1/2 inch cold water. Meanwhile, fill and steam the other cake pan. Loosen the cooled rice sheet from the first pan and roll it out onto the oiled baking sheet. Turn over rice sheet to lightly oil both sides, then, transfer to a platter. Repeat cooking, cooling, and oiling steps with remaining batter. Stack rice sheets on a plate, cover with plastic wrap, and refrigerate at least 2 hours before cutting into noodles or adding stuffings.

Edited by takadi (log)
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