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Heirloom tomatoes


sadistick
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Well for us up here in Toronto, now is the season many have been waiting for, when all these wild and tastey tomatoes near their peak.

Was just wondering what your favourite way of eating these bad boys are...

I like slicing them and salting them, add a little pepper, some good evoo and eating them plain, but then again they make an amazing tomatoe sauce as well!

Heres a few I picked today..

gallery_25807_982_35105.jpg

Cheers

-Justin

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first off there is no such thing as "heirloom tomatoes" and they are NOT wild. they are old breeds that were no more grown because of their lack in immunity and yield. these breeds have all different names, most of them are from europe.

this guy grows 3000 different old tomato breeds !!!

here you can buy seeds for many old breeds (german lang.) its a nonprofit org.

toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

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I just picked up some cute-little orange bad-boys at one of Madison's farmers' markets. Little cherry-tomato-esque buggers. Holy-wah they're good. I've used them in a pasta dish with some tuna and capers and such. Plus they've been great in salads. Just as good to pop in your mouth plain. I think I'm going to put the last of the batch in a mozzarella and basil salad tonight. I'm definately going to have to pick up some more (though maybe a different variety) this saturday.

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first off there is no such thing as "heirloom tomatoes" and they are NOT wild. they are old breeds that were no more grown because of their lack in immunity and yield.  these breeds have all different names, most of them are from europe.

this guy grows 3000 different old tomato breeds !!!

here you can buy seeds for many old breeds (german lang.) its a nonprofit org.

You need to re-examine your definition of heirloom...and yes, there are such things as heirloom tomatoes.

Joey - Some buffalo mozerella is definetly in order! KISS i guess?

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first off there is no such thing as "heirloom tomatoes" and they are NOT wild. they are old breeds that were no more grown because of their lack in immunity and yield.  these breeds have all different names, most of them are from europe.

this guy grows 3000 different old tomato breeds !!!

here you can buy seeds for many old breeds (german lang.) its a nonprofit org.

I beg to differ as tomatos came from the new world. A US source. http://www.tomatofest.com/ also http://www.heirloomtomatoplants.com/ Edited by winesonoma (log)

Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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I just picked up some cute-little orange bad-boys at one of Madison's farmers' markets.  Little cherry-tomato-esque buggers.  Holy-wah they're good.  I've used them in a pasta dish with some tuna and capers and such.  Plus they've been great in salads.  Just as good to pop in your mouth plain.  I think I'm going to put the last of the batch in a mozzarella and basil salad tonight.  I'm definately going to have to pick up some more (though maybe a different variety) this saturday.

I'm going to guess you got Sungold cherry tomatoes -- my very favorite of the cherries. The plants are huge, the fruiting is prolific, and the taste is fantastic! Their only flaw is the tendency to crack when we get rain.

~ Lori in PA

My blog: http://inmykitcheninmylife.blogspot.com/

My egullet blog: http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=89647&hl=

"Cooking is not a chore, it is a joy."

- Julia Child

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I'm sitting here eating a tomato salad of lovelies from my garden: Cherokee Purple, Aunt Gertie's German Green, Super Tasty, and Sungold cherries mixed with fresh basil from the herb garden, fresh garlic, EVOO, red wine vinegar, fleur de sel, and pepper. Hmmm....

~ Lori in PA

My blog: http://inmykitcheninmylife.blogspot.com/

My egullet blog: http://forums.egullet.org/index.php?showtopic=89647&hl=

"Cooking is not a chore, it is a joy."

- Julia Child

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first off there is no such thing as "heirloom tomatoes" and they are NOT wild. they are old breeds that were no more grown because of their lack in immunity and yield.  these breeds have all different names, most of them are from europe.

this guy grows 3000 different old tomato breeds !!!

here you can buy seeds for many old breeds (german lang.) its a nonprofit org.

I beg to differ as tomatos came from the new world. A US source. http://www.tomatofest.com/ also http://www.heirloomtomatoplants.com/

(I believe he was referring to the language of the website, not the origin of the tomatoes sold thereon.)

The perfect way to much heirloom tomatoes, of course, is as part of an only-in-summer-can-it-taste-so-good BLT, preferably made on artisanal bread and apple-smoked bacon.

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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I agree BLT is the way to go. Neiman Ranch Bacon if you can get it.

Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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I didn't put in a garden this year. Now I miss it. Tomatoes aren't quite ready here in Montana. The best way to eat a tomato--in your hand, in the garden. Second best way, with the salt shaker in your other hand.

I used to make a great herb-garlic sourdough bread that I sold at a farmers market in Washington. Two slabs of that and a big old slice of beefsteak tomato--heaven.

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first off there is no such thing as "heirloom tomatoes" and they are NOT wild. they are old breeds that were no more grown because of their lack in immunity and yield.

The assumption that "heirloom tomatoes" are wild by definition is incorrect.

Heirlooms are varieties that are open-pollinated and can be traced back for 50 years or more. Example: My great grandfather brought these over from Czchekoslovakia.

Or, you could cross varieties and come up with your own favorite and circulate the seed in the gardening world and after 50 years, it can be considered an heirloom.

Most of the seeds sold today have been hybridized to ripen at the same time on the plant (normal tomato plants don't do that), be uniform in color, shape, size, be disease resistant, pest resistant, survive days or weeks of transportation and shelf life, etc. After all that... what is the one thing you lose? Flavor.

The average consumer has no idea what a good tomato tastes like when they buy tomatoes they can bring home and hammer a nail with and have no flavor.

Try this combo for another sandwich:

Better Than Sex Tomato Basil Baguette

* french baguette or your favorite artisan bread, fresh as possible (toast if you like)

Ingredients listed in order from bottom to top layer

* mayonnaise (Hellman's Mayonnaise or homemade recommended)

* kalamata olive spread or chopped black olives

* fresh picked heirloom tomato (your favorite variety) sliced - sprinkle with salt & pepper

OR oven roasted tomatoes

OR homemade sun-dried tomatoes stored in herb infused olive oil

* fresh basil leaves (your favorite variety/color)

* optional: tomatoes are exceptionally good when infused in herb infused extra virgin olive oil, fresh mozzarella cheeze, bacon, etc.

Slice the baguette lengthwise so the bottom layer is not too thick. Spread mayo on the bottom layer. Then top with olives/olive spread, add sliced tomatoes, salt, pepper, then basil. Drizzle with olive oil add mozzarella if you like. Finish by adding the top part of the bread. Slice into manageable pieces for sandwiches. This is summer in your mouth!

It is absolutely delicious. If you like basil at all, you'll be craving this one!

This is a favorite in our house.

Sun Dried Heirloom Tomatoes

I take garden fresh tomatoes, slice them, and lay them on food dehydrator trays. They are sprinkled with herbs, kosher salt and freshly ground pepper.

Then I take them outside, (keep them off the ground) to dry in the sun.

At the same time, I'll pour olive oil into a bowl and throw some freshly hand picked herbs from the herb garden, coarse chop them and mix them into the oil (add salt and pepper if you wish), also to sit in the heat of the sun. This infuses the oil tremendously in a couple of hours. (No waiting around for days or weeks in a jar.)

We'll dip fresh bread or crustini into the oil or use it for whatever... if we don't use the sun dried tomatoes all up, I'll stack them in a glass jar and pour the oil in making sure there's enough oil to cover the top of the tomatoes. (Add fresh herbs if you wish, and/or roasted garlic cloves.)

They'll be the best you've ever had. Different than oven dried tomatoes and they make gorgeous gifts.

Edited by mudbug (log)
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Our tomato plants have started growing out the top of the tomato house. So we pruned them back. Anything to fuck with the tree rats. Anyway, We have a brandywine, cherokee purple, early girls and one salsa(which has been a very prolific producer) This tomato house stands over 10 feet tall at the low end. My very first picking, I harvested over 200 tomatos off of 20 plants. Now, I am getting 25-30 a week. The heat and all, but they are setting fruit right along so my fall harvest is looking to be excellent. Oh, I forgot about the grape tomato volunteer that showed up last week. Don't know where it came from, but the tomatos are pretty good.

It is good to be a BBQ Judge.  And now it is even gooder to be a Steak Cookoff Association Judge.  Life just got even better.  Woo Hoo!!!

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first off there is no such thing as "heirloom tomatoes" and they are NOT wild. they are old breeds that were no more grown because of their lack in immunity and yield.  these breeds have all different names, most of them are from europe.

this guy grows 3000 different old tomato breeds !!!

here you can buy seeds for many old breeds (german lang.) its a nonprofit org.

I beg to differ as tomatos came from the new world. A US source. http://www.tomatofest.com/ also http://www.heirloomtomatoplants.com/

It is true that tomatoes originated in South America, but I believe they were widely eaten and cultivated in Europe before North America. I don't know if more cultivars were developed in Europe but it is my understanding that tomatoes were not widely grown and eaten in NA until the 1800's, long after they were widely accepted in Europe.

Here's a link: Tomato history

Cheers,

Anne

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personally i would never make sauce or soup out of them. the flavour is there but for me one of the luxuries of heirlooms is that they have minimal goo in the middle. i think if you cook them than it's like wasting it. not to say it wouldn't make good soup or sauce but i just think that it'd be a shame to throw away that fleshy... flesh

bork bork bork

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I agree BLT is the way to go. Neiman Ranch Bacon if you can get it.

Homemade, in my experience, is vastly superior.

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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In principal, I agree with your thinking on this... the flavor and texture of raw late-summer heirlooms is too fantastic to obscure.

However, one September a couple of years ago, I discovered I could ask vendors at the Pike Place Market for "seconds" of heirloom tomatoes and pay about half price for some bruised or otherwise unmerchandisable heirlooms. I also got some seconds of peak-season locally grown beefsteaks which are also generally excellent raw, also for half price. Once smashed, however, they are rather tough to slice elegantly.

At home I made a spectacularly sweet fresh tomato sauce with the most complex aroma, accented with a little fresh basil and oregano. I have not made a tomato sauce that turned out so well since. And I made it for roughly the same price as the underripe chewy out-of-season tomatoes cost at the supermarket.

personally i would never make sauce or soup out of them. the flavour is there but for me one of the luxuries of heirlooms is that they have minimal goo in the middle. i think if you cook them than it's like wasting it. not to say it wouldn't make good soup or sauce but i just think that it'd be a shame to throw away that fleshy... flesh

Edited by JasonTrue (log)

Jason Truesdell

Blog: Pursuing My Passions

Take me to your ryokan, please

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I beg to differ as tomatos came from the new world.

most, if not all of the breeds that you know under the confusing name "heirloom tomato" have been "developed" in europe... ;-)

cheers

I stand corrected.

:biggrin:

Bruce Frigard

Quality control Taster, Château D'Eau Winery

"Free time is the engine of ingenuity, creativity and innovation"

111,111,111 x 111,111,111 = 12,345,678,987,654,321

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Well, chef koo, i agree with you for the most part, as I just love to enjoy these beauties fresh, however, if you have a large supply and your losing counter space to these buggers, you gotta do something...a fresh tomatoe sauce with basil, really good evoo, and some roasted garlic is amazing...and one thing i find is that since there is not so much 'goo' its a much silkier tastier sauce.

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I do a pasta sauce where I chop garlic and onions and sautee in olive oil, and then throw chpped tomatoes in literally just long enough to get them above room temperature. Not quite raw, but not cooked enough to lose the texture or change the flavor. Throw in some chopped basil, cheese if you're in the mood, maybe some red wine vinegar and pour over your favoprite shape of pasta.

I'm on the pavement

Thinking about the government.

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