Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Chris Amirault

Drinks! (2011–2012)

Recommended Posts

Back from my trip so I decided to celebrate with a Rhino Tooth as described by KatieLoeb.

First tried the Bonal on its own and it was much better than expected. Not too bitter and chilled with a little soda it would be pretty good on it's own.

Got to work on the Rhino Tooth and realized I didn't have a grapefruit in the house so I will have to explore it again when I have all the ingredients.

IMG_5426mod.jpg

Was curious to see how much the Bonal and Benedictine impacted the bourbon and just how sweet it tasted. Seemed just fine in terms of sweetness but boy, howdy that will keep you warm on a cold night! You aren't ever going to forget that this is first and foremost a bourbon drink. The Benedictine and Bonal certainly help round off the edges a bit but I can see why it is important to start with a solid base. I wonder how the Leopold Bros whiskey would work here?

Look forward to trying it again when I have a grapefruit handy to add to the mix.

IMG_3397.jpg

Would have been a perfect companion whilst I was snapping pics of these fellas as I traveled across the veldt in iSimangaliso Wetland Park in southeast South Africa!


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Outstanding! Glad you enjoyed it! Definitely try the grapefruit oils sprayed on top. Makes a difference. But it's a delicious drink either way, I suspect. Just posted another one for you to try in the other thread. If you keep this up you can make every single cocktail on the Oyster House list. Does that mean you won't have any reason to come to Philadelphia? :sad:

Love the photo of the rhino!!! Mind if I copy and forward to my colleague? I think she'd get a real kick out of it.


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Love the photo of the rhino!!! Mind if I copy and forward to my colleague? I think she'd get a real kick out of it.

You may certainly have my permission to share the photo. I will even PM you with a link to my photos from that trip that I have online for you to look at should you wish to do so.

And I love to travel so I don't need much of a reason to go to Philadelphia. Just need the time!


Edited by tanstaafl2 (log)

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Knob Creek old fashioned, w/ sugar, lemon peel and a goodly couple dashes of angostura, nothing else (although i do prefer to stir my old fashioneds briefly in a mixing glass and then pour into a frozen rocks glass with little or no ice as opposed to building in the old fashioned glass)

EDIT: And considering I went to the gym today and I guess I can afford the calories I just had an Intro to Aperol post-dinner drink, a bit on the bitter side considering I am lacking simple atm and put too little sugar in the shaker. (simple to be made ASAP, most likely tomorrow)


Edited by Sohoskiracer (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Went shopping today and came home with some stuff. Mixed up a Last Word (thanks, Wikipedia). Holy shit. Awesome. Can't wait to try some of the variations I've seen kicking about eGullet.


Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 oz Herradura Reposado

1 oz Dolin Sweet Vermouth

1/2 oz Averna

2 Dashes Housemade Chocolate Bitters

Stirred & strained into a rocks glass over large ice, garnished with a grapefruit peel.

Thanks!


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dark and Stormy - definitely a drink that is more than the sum of it's parts, although dependent on the quality of the ginger beer used. fortunately it is one thing that is very easy to get hold of in the UK. I sometimes add a dash of bitters to it as well, especially if I'm using a lighter rum.


I love animals.

They are delicious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Drinking a lot of Old Fashioned lately, really nice way to drink a good bourbon essentially straight. Started playing around with ideas on the bar, seems there's a lot of subtle flavours that could be blended in, particularly with the bitters.

Tried a Grand Marnier and amaretto mix the other night too, plenty of ice and 2 drops of angostura, lovely balance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I.P.A. ---> I.P.C. (imperial pegu club)

1.5 oz. cascade hop aromatized seagram's gin

.75 oz. triple-sec

.75 oz. lime juice

dash angostura bitters

quite lovely.


abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Probably would not admit this if I wasn't already halfway through a glass of this stuff, but it struck me that a splash of Cointreau might be an interesting addition to a glass Kirsberry, and--provided that you, like myself, find the concept of 'too sweet' more or less meaningless--I can kind of recommend this. Although it's sweet, it has a fair amount of dimension.


Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I got a half bottle of benedictine the other day so I could make some ft. Washington Flips for the winter, and I was looking on cocktail DB for more cocktails using it, (that do not have chartreuse, as i do not yet have a bottle of that. $50 is always just more than i have)and I found an Argentina cocktail. half each gin and dry vermouth, and a quarter coutreau and benedictine with orange and angostura bitters. I may have slightly over done the cointreau and benedictine. 1/4 ounce is a small measure. I increased my dashes of angostura after the first sip, i prefer fairly heavy bitter. I wont make this drink again, but it was not worthy of the sink. If i was to sum it up in gross terms i would say marmalade tini. I may also be a little jaded with cocktails containing cointreau or orange.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you're looking for Benedictine recipes, there are a bunch in the "brown, bitter and stirred" category, such as the Vieux Carre, Cocktail ala Louisianne, Monte Carlo, the Bobby Burns, etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brown bitter and stirred may be my favorite category. I really like a ala Louisianne. I may try making it with out the absinthe. Which I do not usually care for an do not have. Does leaving out the dash of absinthe or pernod really change this into something else?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

First night off the antibiotics from my impalement on glass, first drink from the bottle of Bulleit rye I got recently. Old fashioned! 3 oz rye, 1 generous dash Angostura, 1 dash Regans' orange bitters, and a couple dashes turbinado (Sugar in the Raw) 1:1 simple syrup. Garnished with a homemade Luxardo-soaked dried cherry and with a lemon twist squeezed over the top. Excellent drink, though next time will add a bit less syrup.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Small dinner party last night in which I featured the El Presidente recipe in the September issue of Imbibe by Splificator/Dave Wondrich as the opening cocktail.

1 ½ oz. rich white rum

1 ½ oz. Dolin Vermouth Blanc (Martini & Rossi or Cinzano Bianco are fine substitutes)

1 barspoon orange Curaçao or Grand Marnier

½ barspoon real grenadine

Thinly cut orange peel

Garnish: maraschino cherry (optional)

Stir ingredients well with cracked ice and strain into a chilled glass. Twist a swatch of thinly cut orange peel over the top and drop in or discard as you prefer. Garnish, if desired, with a cherry.

Didn't have a rich white rum (I assume something like Flor de Caña 4 yo white? I have the Starr rum from Maritius but wasn't sure that was the right choice) so I used Barbancourt 8 yo since it was a special occasion. Used the Senor white curacao and the grenadine mix from Doc Cocktails Vintage Spirits book. Orange peel and a Luxardo cherry sealed the deal.

But most importantly broke open a new bottle of Dolin Blanc and it really did seem to help. Will have to try this side by side with regular dry vermouth and see if it is a big difference or just my imagination. I also liked the El Presidente variation I had at Leon's a couple of weeks ago that used Carpano Antica so I may try that again soon too.

Dinner was Middle Eastern/Mediterranean food which wasn't exactly Caribbean themed but seemed to work out OK. Also mixed it up with a few Margara's during dinner (tried the Bittermans Xocolatl mole bitters instead of Angostura orange which seemed to work) and I had an Eva Peron for myself just to change the pace. The evening finished with Castries peanut rum cream and 1921 Tequila cream liqueurs.

Everyone seemed to have a good time! Well, those that could still move...


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brown bitter and stirred may be my favorite category. I really like a ala Louisianne. I may try making it with out the absinthe. Which I do not usually care for an do not have. Does leaving out the dash of absinthe or pernod really change this into something else?

If you like the a la Louisianne, but not the absinthe, try the Creole.


True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Last night we discovered the '3G' in the Mixology (for Android) app.

Rinse Martini glass with Ricard (lacking this, we used absinthe). Shake together 2½ parts gin, 2 parts St Germaine, 1 part Domaine de Canton with ice. Pour, sip and smile.


Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

eGullet Ethics Code signatory

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made a Brooklyn, substituting Averna for Amer Picon, because in the backwaters aka The United States, one has to make due with what's available. Here's the Recipe:

1 1/2 oz Rye

1/2 oz Dry Vermouth

1/4 oz Averna

1/4 oz Maraschino liqueur

I loved it. I'd like to try one made properly just to see if it stands up to this variation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...mixed it up with a few Margara's during dinner (tried the Bittermans Xocolatl mole bitters instead of Angostura orange which seemed to work)

I think that's a great idea. I'll have to try it myself and maybe refine the recipe. With Creole Shrubb, the Angostura Orange is probably redundant.

I made a Brooklyn, substituting Averna for Amer Picon,

I think you want something with a stronger orange backbone like CioCiaro or Lucano, if you can find it. Absent that, I'd add some orange bitters of some sort, I think. I have a batch of Amer Boudreau cooking that's almost done, and I hear the new Bittermen's Amere Nouvelle is about to land at a Massachusetts distributor. It's already available at DrinkUpNY (which doesn't ship to MA).

Last night for Thursday Drink Night: Halloween I made a Boulevardier riff with Mirto for sweet vermouth, a dash of Spanish Bitters, and a pair of lemon swaths. Nice. A touch sweet, so I might add a bit of dry vermouth next time. Called it Vlad the Imbiber for the red color. Mirto is nice stuff.


Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...mixed it up with a few Margara's during dinner (tried the Bittermans Xocolatl mole bitters instead of Angostura orange which seemed to work)

I think that's a great idea. I'll have to try it myself and maybe refine the recipe. With Creole Shrubb, the Angostura Orange is probably redundant.

Yes, that was kind of my thinking along with the fact that the bitters seems to be a good pairing with tequila in general. In any case I was happy with the outcome. A good drink for the Creole Shrubb and I liked it better than the first one I made with Ango orange and others seemed to like it as well. So I will likely keep making it that way.


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I made a Brooklyn, substituting Averna for Amer Picon,

I think you want something with a stronger orange backbone like CioCiaro or Lucano, if you can find it.

I've avoided the Brooklyn due to not having Amer Picon... but I do have Lucano so maybe I'll stop avoiding it now.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...