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Drinks! (2011–2012)


Chris Amirault
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1 oz. cascade mountain gin from bendistillery, oregon

.5 oz. jalinek kosher slivovitz

1 oz. m&r bianco vermouth

.5 oz. brandymel

3 drops acid phosphate

cascade mountain gin is my new favorite. it has an elegant brashness. the tonality of their juniper is superbly extraordinary. and the price, $24 retail for a craft spirit. amazing.

i've made iterations of this before, but never with acid phosphate. i though some unobtrusive acidity would help an otherwise sweet leaning drink. everything worked out nicely.

abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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Tonight I finally made time to whip up a batch of Katie's Dessert spiced syrup.

This one is going in the upcoming book. I use this for a lot of different applications. Good to give anything that autumnal warmth - Old Fashioneds, hot toddies, etc.

Dessert Spiced Syrup

3 cups water

6 cinnamon sticks, broken up

18 whole cloves

4 star anise

12 allspice berries

12 black peppercorns

¼ teaspoon red chile flakes

3 cups sugar

Bring water to a boil in a small saucepan and add spices. Allow to boil for three minutes. Add sugar and stir to dissolve. Lower heat and allow syrup to simmer for ten minutes, stirring occasionally. Turn off heat and allow to cool to room temperature. Strain out spices before using and funnel into clean glass bottles for storage. Refrigerate for up to one month.

IMG_5497mod.jpg

IMG_5501.jpg

The aroma of the spices was quite delightful. Decided to use regular sugar but if I make more I might try using Demerara sugar for added flavor.

IMG_5502mod.jpg

Final product still had a bit of flotsam and a tad of jetsam floating in it after straining but that no doubt adds to the enjoyment! Had a bit "neat" once it had cooled. I think for me it was a tad to peppery so I may modify the recipe a bit with less black pepper and crushed red pepper (which I hope is more or less the same as red chile flakes).

Perhaps the peppery-ness will be a bit muted when used in a drink.

It does make quite a lot! May have to try to cut it down a bit next time. Plan to take this batch to Thanksgiving to share with family and friends. Was going to have a rum Old Fashioned with it but by the time it cooled it was getting a bit late. So I will need to try an old fashioned or two for myself in the near future in addition to any other drinks that it might be useful in.

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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Wild Turkey 101 rye Manhattan. Carpano Antica. Angostura and Whiskey Barrel aged bitters. Home made cocktail cherries. A bit of the cherry preserving liquid which is cognac, Heering and the cherry poaching liquid with spices. Most definitely hit the spot. Bullseye!

Edited by KatieLoeb (log)

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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alexander

1.5 oz. brillet pineau des charentes

.75 oz. organic heavy cream

.75 oz. del maguay vida mezcal

grated nutmeg

most excellent.

1.5 oz. brillet pineau des charentes

.75 oz. organic heavy cream

.75 oz. lemon heart 151

grated nutmeg

completely exceptable

1.5 oz. brillet pineau des charentes

.75 oz. organic heavy cream

.75 oz. 1997 panama rum finished by renegade rum co. in port wine casks

grated nutmeg

righteous!

abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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cascade mountain gin is my new favorite. it has an elegant brashness. the tonality of their juniper is superbly extraordinary. and the price, $24 retail for a craft spirit. amazing.

Interesting. I thought I read somewhere that Cascade gin was infused spirits and not redistilled afterwards. Anyone know if that is the case? I guess if it works, cool.

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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Tonight I finally made time to whip up a batch of Katie's Dessert spiced syrup.

This one is going in the upcoming book. I use this for a lot of different applications. Good to give anything that autumnal warmth - Old Fashioneds, hot toddies, etc.

Dessert Spiced Syrup

3 cups water

6 cinnamon sticks, broken up

18 whole cloves

4 star anise

12 allspice berries

12 black peppercorns

¼ teaspoon red chile flakes

3 cups sugar

Bring water to a boil in a small saucepan and add spices. Allow to boil for three minutes. Add sugar and stir to dissolve. Lower heat and allow syrup to simmer for ten minutes, stirring occasionally. Turn off heat and allow to cool to room temperature. Strain out spices before using and funnel into clean glass bottles for storage. Refrigerate for up to one month.

IMG_5497mod.jpg

IMG_5501.jpg

The aroma of the spices was quite delightful. Decided to use regular sugar but if I make more I might try using Demerara sugar for added flavor.

IMG_5502mod.jpg

Final product still had a bit of flotsam and a tad of jetsam floating in it after straining but that no doubt adds to the enjoyment! Had a bit "neat" once it had cooled. I think for me it was a tad to peppery so I may modify the recipe a bit with less black pepper and crushed red pepper (which I hope is more or less the same as red chile flakes).

Perhaps the peppery-ness will be a bit muted when used in a drink.

It does make quite a lot! May have to try to cut it down a bit next time. Plan to take this batch to Thanksgiving to share with family and friends. Was going to have a rum Old Fashioned with it but by the time it cooled it was getting a bit late. So I will need to try an old fashioned or two for myself in the near future in addition to any other drinks that it might be useful in.

Dontcha know I was just posting in the other thread about this...

Glad you got around to trying it. It definitely tastes stronger on its own than it does when mixed. If you still find it too "hot" for you then just cut back on the peppercorns and pepper flakes. Or you could do what I suggested in the other thread and add a few slices of peeled fresh ginger for a less peppery hot flavor of heat.

I find that a gold coffee filter works very well for straining this and then you don't have to strain wee bits of spices through your teeth. :rolleyes:

I have about a quart leftover from my batch and I might divide it into two smaller containers and freeze one. I haven't tried freezing this specific syrup, but have had excellent results freezing other flavors to no ill effect whatsoever.

I'm going to make myself an Old Fashioned #6 tonight before bed. I've earned it... :smile:

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Dontcha know I was just posting in the other thread about this...

Glad you got around to trying it. It definitely tastes stronger on its own than it does when mixed. If you still find it too "hot" for you then just cut back on the peppercorns and pepper flakes. Or you could do what I suggested in the other thread and add a few slices of peeled fresh ginger for a less peppery hot flavor of heat.

I find that a gold coffee filter works very well for straining this and then you don't have to strain wee bits of spices through your teeth. :rolleyes:

I have about a quart leftover from my batch and I might divide it into two smaller containers and freeze one. I haven't tried freezing this specific syrup, but have had excellent results freezing other flavors to no ill effect whatsoever.

I'm going to make myself an Old Fashioned #6 tonight before bed. I've earned it... :smile:

I saw that! Was just about to settle into an OF #6 as I type. Will keep the idea of ginger on hand for the next time.

I think we may have a gold filter somewhere. When we switched to the single serve coffee thingie (Can you tell I don't drink coffee...) it probably got tucked away somewhere.

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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I have two gold filters in the house that fit my coffeemaker. First one came with the machine and the other I bought for a dollar at a garage sale so I'd have a spare. They get rotated through being used for coffee and being used as a tiny version of the chinoise for straining smaller batches of stuff that I don't feel like dirtying the big stainless steel one over. They also go through the dishwasher easily on the top shelf, which I love!

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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med_gallery_7409_6884_797979.jpg

This was the better photo of the two of these I made tonight. First was Goslings Gold rum + Smith & Cross with a dash of Goslings dark to give it some character. It was good but not stellar.

Then I remembered I had some La Favorite Ambre in the house and substituted it in the second drink. Also added a dash of Fee Brothers Black Walnut bitters along with the Angostura just because I've been meaning to play with them and this seemed as good an application as any. Much better drink this round. I still stand by the original recipe of the Scarlet Ibis and the Smith & Cross being the foundation of this cocktail. Nothing can quite replace the funk or the complex bass notes in the Scarlet Ibis with something else. It's just not the same. However, the second iteration was a vast improvement over the first. Fat flamed orange peel is crucial as well.

And now I shall tottle off to bed....

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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Scotch and soda hitting the spot this very instant.

Weather is getting to where a warm drink would be nice. Toddy?

This is my skillet. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My skillet is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it, as I must master my life. Without me my skillet is useless. Without my skillet, I am useless. I must season my skillet well. I will. Before God I swear this creed. My skillet and myself are the makers of my meal. We are the masters of our kitchen. So be it, until there are no ingredients, but dinner. Amen.

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Last night I went with Katie's Old Fashioned #6 except that I subbed the Mole bitters for the Whiskey barrel aged bitters and had it with a single large ice cube. Not sure it needed the ice but it was habit I suppose.

Old Fashioned #6

1.5 oz. Scarlet Ibis

1 oz. Smith & Cross

scant .5 oz. spiced simple syrup (cinnamon, cloves, allspice, black peppercorns, star anise, red pepper flakes)

dash Fee Brothers Whiskey Barrel Aged bitters

Stir until well chilled and strain into a rocks glass. Garnish with a fat flamed orange peel.

This was my own spin on a drink my good buddy Nick Jarrett made for me back when he still lived in Philly. The Smith & Cross props up the Ibis with the extra proof and the funkiness of the Scarlet Ibis really shines. The spiced simple, whiskey barrel bitters and flamed orange make this drink very autumnal. This is a real rum drinkers Old Fashioned. Simple but delicious. Let me know if you give it a whirl...

Quite a lot going on in a single glass! But well worth having again. Might also try a smidge of orange bitters as the peel didn't seem to add that much orange to the drink (or perhaps I did it wrong).

I suppose I should also try it once as written!

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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I've found that the cutting of the orange peel is crucial to the perfect flamed peel. Cut a contact lens shaped piece of thick skinned orange peel with lots of pith but no flesh. Strike a wooden match and heat up the outer surface of the peel before you give it a quick pinch and spray the warmed oils through the flame onto the surface of the drink. There should be a very visible poof of flames and you should smell the carmelized oils as well as see them on the surface of the drink. This takes practice but is a skill worth mastering.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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I've found that the cutting of the orange peel is crucial to the perfect flamed peel. Cut a contact lens shaped piece of thick skinned orange peel with lots of pith but no flesh. Strike a wooden match and heat up the outer surface of the peel before you give it a quick pinch and spray the warmed oils through the flame onto the surface of the drink. There should be a very visible poof of flames and you should smell the carmelized oils as well as see them on the surface of the drink. This takes practice but is a skill worth mastering.

Do you then drop the peel into the drink as well? I did.

I got a decent spurt of flame when I pinched it (watched the Jamie Boudreau video again first to be sure!) so I think I was pretty close.

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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This one just occurred to me last night.

I was sipping B&B, and no I don't mean I made myself some B&B, I was actually drinking the branded version from the bottle (don't ask why I had this on hand.)

It occurred to me, hey, B&B is a not a bad thing, especially when you make it yourself, but it's barely a 'cocktail.'

I'm sure it's been done before, but why not make this into a decent cocktail like an Old Fashioned or, even better, an Improved.

Here's the punchline, and really the only reason I'm so excited about this drink:

I'm going to call it the 'Bigger & Better.' *toothy grin*

For obvious reasons, but also as a nod to the fact that it's an 'improved' cocktail, in more ways than one.

I'm thinking:

2 oz Cognac (Maison Surrenne / Pierre Ferrand)

.50 oz Benedictine

2 dashes Bitters (Ango, until I settle on something better)

2 dashes Maraschino

(we'll wait and see about a dash of absinthe or curacao or whatever)

Garnish Orange peel

Really I just liked the cheeky, and slightly cruel name.

-Tyler

Drink Instigator

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Alexander

2 oz. pineau des charentes (brillet)

1 oz. organic heavy cream

1 oz. cocoa aromatized "whitened" whiskey (evan williams bourbon)

my favorite of the recent series of alexanders. even better than the 1997 port wood panama rum version.

abstract expressionist beverage compounder

creator of acquired tastes

bostonapothecary.com

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My first Ward 8. Rittenhouse rye, blood orange, and new home made grenadine. I think the lemon is too dominant. I'd dial it way back.

It's always a bit of a dilema whether to use the precious hard to replace Rittenhouse on a new drink or to go with the easier to replace (but more expensive if you don't count the airfare) Wild Turkey rye. But blood orange season is short here and I wanted to give this one my best shot.

Imperfect as always in politics but I'd vote for this one.

It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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Alexander

2 oz. pineau des charentes (brillet)

1 oz. organic heavy cream

1 oz. cocoa aromatized "whitened" whiskey (evan williams bourbon)

my favorite of the recent series of alexanders. even better than the 1997 port wood panama rum version.

Sounds nice... but no Pineau available where I live or anywhere relatively close. I might have to do some playing around with the Alexander theme myself. Something to supplement the usual suspects (eggnog, etc.) around the holidays.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Do you then drop the peel into the drink as well? I did.

I got a decent spurt of flame when I pinched it (watched the Jamie Boudreau video again first to be sure!) so I think I was pretty close.

You can if you want. Or run it around the rim, dip it in and discard it. Up to you. Depends how much orange flavor you want hanging around in that glass.

Warming the peel first in addition to cutting it right seem to be the tricks that help most. Holding the peel not too close to the flame helps too. You want to spray the oils through the flame and have them alight, not wet the head of the match and put it out, if that makes sense.

Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

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I think Drink Lab 8 took a big step forward. Zach Pearson suggested anejo tequila. I forgot the anejo part and tried reposado. This is a much better drink than with rye. Very nice, in fact.

Drink Lab 9 - Join the fun

by Kindred Cocktails Group Effort (I hope)

3/4 oz Tequila (Reposado or maybe anejo?)

3/4 oz Sloe gin, Plymouth

3/4 oz Campari

3/4 oz Lime juice

Shake, strain, lowball, rocks

Kindred Cocktails | Craft + Collect + Concoct + Categorize + Community

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Easily offended experts and enthusiasts should probably look away now... I was just having fun. :biggrin: It's based on the flavors of Pierre Herme's Ispahan macaron. The base spirit was chosen because a) it has more character than vodka without steering the flavor too much and b) I bought it so I need to use it. :raz:

salut à ispahan

1 1/2 oz White Owl white whisky

1/2 oz Okanagan Spirits raspberry liqueur (fruity and nicely balanced, tastes like liquid raspberries)

1/2 oz lemon juice

1/2 oz lychee syrup (I used the liquid from a container of lychees in syrup)

1/8 oz Luxardo amaretto (I think orgeat would be better than another amaretto, this needs the true almond flavor)

1/2 oz egg white

3 drops rose water

4 raspberries (I used some local wild raspberries I have in the freezer)

Muddle berries, add everything else, dry shake, shake with ice, strain.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Ok, I got around to trying my "Improved" B&B Old Fashioned. It was delish, and goes thus:

Bigger & Better

2 oz Pierre Ferrand Cognac

.50 oz Benedictine

2 dashes Regans' Orange Bitters

1 dash Angostura Bitters

1 dash Maraschino

1 dash Absinthe

Orange peel garnish

-Tyler

Drink Instigator

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First-ever mai tai:

387431_695735304081_37003198_35574759_171116573_n.jpg

1 oz Appleton Extra

1 oz Smith & Cross

1 oz lime juice

1/2 oz Cointreau

1/2 oz orgeat, freshly made today.

What a spectacular drink! It's quite tart, but man, the flavors going on are just something else. I'll be making a lot more of these!

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Wanted to try something new out of Beta Cocktails, so I whipped up The Arbitrary Nature of Time by Maks. It's Wild Turkey Rye, Campari and Cherry Heering with Mole and Regans' bitters. The combination of Campari and Heering was fruity and delicious.

Wanting to stay in the same oeuvre, I consulted Maks' twitter to see what else he's been up to lately. From last week's 'Something Like This' menu, devoted to riffs on Charles Baker drinks, the Jockey Club Cocktail caught my eye. I have no idea of the proportions, but my interpretation turned out pretty tasty, so I figured I'd share it.

Jockey Club Cocktail (Improvised)

3/4 oz Lemon Hart 151 Rum

3/4 oz Lime Juice

1/2 oz Green Chartreuse

1/4 oz Luxardo Maraschino

I packed the shaker with ice and gave it a very hard shake. The chill obtained was also rather impressive due to the proof.

True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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