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Millions of people believe eggs to be non vegetarian(in the Indian sense of the word) including almost everbody that I know.

If they are so deemed, then Milk also fits in the same category. And if I stretch the cusp further, Yogurt and Bread too.

If your egg is not like this,then it is vegetarian. Of course you have every right to be part of everbody that I know. :biggrin:

A very simple and effective recipe is to make a faux souffle by microwaving beaten eggs in a ramekin or a round upright pan.

An egg curry is on most hostelite/student's daily fare.

Share your anda fundas here.

I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

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i've posted a couple of my favourites ages ago in the 'egg curry' thread.

egg and peanut salad-i gather this is from the ratnagiri region.chopped boiled eggs mixed with grated coconut,green chillis,cilantro,tamarind pulp and crushed,roasted peanuts.this is really good in sandwiches with crisp lettuce and peanut butter-or my favourite-sesame butter.

eggs poached in green chutney-the kind used for patrani machhi

nargisi koftas when i'm not in a hurry.

so what do non-vegetarian eggs eat? :hmmm:

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Gingerly, I can't wait to try your egg salad. Sounds delicious. I hardly ever make anything Indian out of eggs (if you don't count my children that is, haha) - about time I rectified that. I do make this hyderabadi breakfast dish occasionally. Make a spicy tomato sauce with mustard, garlic, green chillies in the tadka, then break the eggs into it and simmer until set (although I prefer a runny yolk). The other things I usually do are the Indian-style omelette or maybe a bhurji. Otherwise it's usually boiled/fried/scrambled eggs, french toast, stuffed omelettes or egg salad sandwich.

Suman

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I have a question, I know that it is advised that one should eat egg white and avoid the yolk but does that apply to kids? A friend has been told by her pediatrician that she should not give her two year old daughter the yold of the egg.

Rushina

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But these days, they recommend eggs to everybody, even adults. Eggs contain cholestrol, but not much saturated fats. Recent research shows that it's not cholestrol in foods which raises your own cholestrol, but the saturated fat in it. So eggs are once again popular as the healthy food.

Suman

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Ah Suman, you have been keeping tabs on eggs too. :smile: New Research Shows

That Eating Eggs Doesn't Raise Heart Disease Risk Profile

New research shows that egg cholesterol does not impact the harmful, most atherogenic, LDL-cholesterol particles in blood, according to a new study published in the June issue of Metabolism. Based on this study and others, strategies to effectively control harmful blood lipids that increase risk for cardiovascular disease -- the leading killer of both American men and women -- is to eat a diet that is low in saturated and trans fatty acids, rather than focusing on dietary cholesterol.

University of Connecticut researchers studied over 50 men and women and found that the addition of either one egg or three eggs a day did not raise the fractions of LDL-cholesterol that increase one's risk for heart disease. "We found that the dietary cholesterol in eggs does raise the LDL-1 and LDL-2 fractions but it does not impact the small, dense LDL-3 through LDL-7 particles that are the greatest threat for cardiovascular disease risk," explained Maria Luz Fernandez, PhD. "We also found that that egg cholesterol did not impact the small, dense LDL particles among a sub-set of participants who were genetically predisposed to being most sensitive to dietary cholesterol."

Only in the past decade have researchers found that LDL-cholesterol has many fractions, with varying degrees of risk for cardiovascular disease. Prior to this groundbreaking discovery, scientists did not understand LDL- fractions and only used total LDL-cholesterol measures as risk for heart disease. Any increase in LDL cholesterol would have been thought to result in an increase in risk, but this has been refuted in more recent studies.

This is one possible explanation why studies have not consistently shown a positive association between LDL-cholesterol and heart disease, explains Fernandez. "The way we are now giving dietary advice to manage blood lipid levels is changing, due to the more sophisticated measures of LDL that we have available."

Research shows that LDL-1 and LDL-2 are large particles that pose little risk while fraction LDL-3 through LDL-7 are small, dense particles that wreak havoc on the arteries by triggering inflammation and increasing oxidation. The researchers did find that the harmful LDL fractions were influenced by gender, with men having a greater concentration of small LDL particles compared to women, regardless of the type of diets they followed.

Do double anda omelette!

I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

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A friend has been told by her pediatrician that she should not give her two year old daughter the yold of the egg.

Rushina

i believe this is in reference to salmonella poisoning and applies to soft-boiled eggs. (which were a staple of my toddlerhood if i recall correctly)

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A friend has been told by her pediatrician that she should not give her two year old daughter the yold of the egg.

Rushina

i believe this is in reference to salmonella poisoning and applies to soft-boiled eggs. (which were a staple of my toddlerhood if i recall correctly)

did the pediatrician say avoid the yolk altogether?

i remember being advised by mom when beginning kids

on eggs (~ 12 months) to start very slowly, with the white,

very small quantity. if no allergic reactions, slowly increase the

quantity.

then go on to yolk in the same way, and over 2-3 months you

can increase to the full egg.

i was told this was due to the potential for allergic reactions......

we did soft scramble eggs for the babies until they were older

and now whole family prefers hard boiled....

milagai

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Ah Suman, you have been keeping tabs on eggs too. :smile:

I'll read anything if it relates to health (and needless to say, food), which is not to say that I'm a health freak or anything. I love my food too much to eat too healthily, but since I'm the main (read:only) cook in the house, I kind of feel responsible for what I feed my DH and children.

BTW,I forgot to mention Anda chaat : boiled eggs mashed a bit with raw chopped onion, green chillies, coriander leaves, chaat masala and ketchup!

Suman

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Spurred by the Bengali duck egg curry link above, I did some detectivegiri and located a source for Duck and Quail eggs. I must confess I've only had them as French preparations abroad, any of you all have come across them in India?

I fry by the heat of my pans. ~ Suresh Hinduja

http://www.gourmetindia.com

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  • 1 month later...

Hope this is the right place to post the egg recipes that some had requested.

This recipe is for a Parsi dish, "Sali per Eda" (Eggs on shoestring potatoes):

1 medium onion

1 medium tomato

2 Fresh eggs

Handful of potato shoetrings

1/2 tsp cumin

1/2 tsp garam masala

1/2 tsp tumeric

1/2 tsp chilli powder

2 gloves garlic

1 tbsp oil or ghee

Salt to taste

Finely chop the onions and saute them in a non-stick frying pan with the oil or ghee. Once they start to brown, add the cumin, tumeric, garam masala, garlic and chili powder.

f71f3a72.jpg

Saute for a few more minutes and add in the tomato, which has been diced. Once the tomato has started to get incorporated, sprinke the shoestring potatoes on top.

f71f3932.jpg

Crack 2 fresh eggs on top, add a few drops of water and cover the frying pan. Within a few minutes, the eggs should be cooked to your preference. I like the yolk a bit runny, just like a poached egg you get with Eggs Benedict.

f71f3893.jpg

Garnish with some paprika or chilli powder, spring onions, parsley, whatever you like.

f71f3844.jpg

I recommend serving this with some roti (or a flour tortilla as a substitute). You can see the consistency I like in the pic below.

f71f37b4.jpg

Enjoy and hope the end result looks something like this...

f71f376e.jpg

Cheers

Percy

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Spurred by the Bengali duck egg curry link above, I did some detectivegiri and located a source for Duck and Quail eggs. I must confess I've only had them as French preparations abroad, any of you all have come across them in India?

Episure. Sorry I just saw this yesterday. Duck eggs are indeed available in Bengal. When I was growing up in Kolkata, duck eggs were very commonly available, and we used to have them regularly.
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Hope this is the right place to post the egg recipes that some had requested.

This recipe is for a Parsi dish, "Sali per Eda" (Eggs on shoestring potatoes):

1 medium onion

1 medium tomato

2 Fresh eggs

Handful of potato shoetrings

1/2 tsp cumin

1/2 tsp garam masala

1/2 tsp tumeric

1/2 tsp chilli powder

2 gloves garlic

1 tbsp oil or ghee

Salt to taste

Finely chop the onions and saute them in a non-stick frying pan with the oil or ghee. Once they start to brown, add the cumin, tumeric, garam masala, garlic and chili powder.

f71f3a72.jpg

Saute for a few more minutes and add in the tomato, which has been diced. Once the tomato has started to get incorporated, sprinke the shoestring potatoes on top.

f71f3932.jpg

Crack 2 fresh eggs on top, add a few drops of water and cover the frying pan. Within a few minutes, the eggs should be cooked to your preference. I like the yolk a bit runny, just like a poached egg you get with Eggs Benedict.

f71f3893.jpg

Garnish with some paprika or chilli powder, spring onions, parsley, whatever you like.

f71f3844.jpg

I recommend serving this with some roti (or a flour tortilla as a substitute). You can see the consistency I like in the pic below.

f71f37b4.jpg

Enjoy and hope the end result looks something like this...

f71f376e.jpg

Cheers

Percy

Thanks for the recipe and the snaps Percy. It's not like I need an excuse to try Parsi food, but your photographs will be an added incentive.

Suman

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Bong, what do you make with duck eggs?

I hardly make anything with duck eggs these days. Its difficult to find duck eggs here. When I was growing up, however, we just used duck eggs the same way you would use regular hen eggs. (Indian style "omelet"/"hard-boiled eggs"/"half-boiled eggs" for breakfast, or egg curry for lunch/dinner etc.)

And Percy, many thanks for your recipe, especially for the photos. Can't wait to try this out. Looks easy to prepare as well.

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Percy, thanks for the egg recipes, the pictures are not loading now, but I'll check after some time.

Episure,

The pictures are hosted on imagestation and I have noticed that they occassionally don't appear :sad: . I am not sure if this is an issue with Imagestation or eGullet (will investigate later).

If you are interested in the pics of the above recipe and others yet to be posted (including Lagan Nu Custard), you can visit my ImageStation cooking album

Cheers

Percy

Edited by percyn (log)
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  • 2 months later...
  • 1 month later...

Parsi Poro (Omlette) adapted from Cyrus Todiwala's Cafe Spice Namaste cook book.

2 green chiles (I didnt have any handy)

3 garlic gloves

1/2 inch fresh ginger (I used ginger paste)

1 tbsp chopped fresh cilantro (I was all out, so used some dried cilantro)

Pinch of Tumeric

1/2 tsp cumin seeds (I used cumin powder)

1 tbsp flour

1 tbsp clarified butter, ghee or oil

2 egg yolks

4 egg whites (I just used 2 eggs)

Mash the spices with ginger and garlic in a mortar.

Lightly beat the egg yolks and add in the spice paste.

Beat the egg whites until stiff and fold in the flour and egg yolk/spice mixture.

gallery_21049_162_1104804824.jpg

Heat the ghee, clarified butter or oil and add the egg mixture. Cyrus suggests placing the pan in a 425 F oven to bake through, but I just made mine in the frying pan over the stove.

gallery_21049_162_1104804846.jpg

Serve with lightly toasted bread. Traditionally this is served with Pav (a small brioch type bread) and I remember eating it as a kid with ketchup. You can also try a variation by adding 1/2 finley chopped onion or 2 shallots.

gallery_21049_162_1104804863.jpg

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I believe the reason that duck eggs were popular in Bengal and perhaps elswhere was that some Hindus did not eat chicken eggs for the same reason they did not eat chicken. My husband remembers as a child in Calcutta that the egg man would come to the house selling duck eggs and then would whisper secretively "We have chicken eggs too, if you want them." Any thoughts on this?

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