Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

tan319

Please Translate This! Help with Foreign Language Recipes, Culinary Terms, Labels

Recommended Posts

Brauner Sirup = a thick brown syrup obtained from sugar beets. Substitute treacle or molasses?

Susse Mandeln = these are regular almonds, they're simply labelled 'sweet' to differentiate them from bitter almonds.

Susse Sahne = regular whipping cream. Labelled 'sweet' to differentiate it from sour cream.

Schmalz = PORK fat. Use lard. (Going from your recipe ingredients, you are making one of the typical German Christmas cookies, they use pork fat, and other recipes with similar ingredients specify this even more clearly by calling it Schweineschmalz).

Pottash is often used in German cookies, but only in Christmas cookies, many of which tend to have a slightly different texture to other cookies. Maybe someone who knows more than me about baking could say if it essential to texture?

Incidentally, Pottasche and Pfefferkuchengewurz tend to start appearing on supermarket shelves here around September, and disappear again in January. They are sold in flat foil packets, and are cheap. If you're stuck, PM me, and I'll send you some. Given the packaging, mailing them should be easy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Brauner Sirup = a thick brown syrup obtained from sugar beets. Substitute treacle or molasses?

I wouldn't use blackstrap though. Fancy, if you're going to use molasses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would cosider using Steen's Pure Cane Syrup as a substitue for Braunen Sirup.

Also, you can buy Grafschafter Sugar Beet Syrup from a Houston store called Spec's at Spec's Online. :biggrin:

Good luck. Let us know how it turns out when you are finished!


Edited by Motochef (log)

Motochef! Enjoying fine food while motorcycle touring.

Motoblog! Motochef's Notes, Comments and Points of Interest

Motochef!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Through the recent D'Artagnan freezer sale, I acquired five pounds of rabbit livers. I asked Wolfert for a recommendation and she forwarded the following recipe to me, most of which I can figure out even with my poor ability at translation, however the péké has us both stumped -- gin or juniper berries? Any additional insights would be greatly appreciated!

Pâté de foie de lapin au péké 

Ingrédients:

750 g de foie de lapin

750 g de haché de porc

2 oeufs

2 tranches de pain

1 oignon coupé en petit dés

une vingtaine de baies de génévrier

1 cuiller à soupe de saindoux ou de graisse de canard

Sel et poivre du moulin 33 cl de bière refermentée en bouteille

10 cl de péké (1/2 tasse)

1/2 tasse de lait

2 feuilles de laurier

1 branche de thym

1 bonne pincée de grains de poivre noir

Préparation:

Commencez par enlevez les "nerfs" blancs dans les foies de lapin. Dans un grand saladier, mettez la bière, le genièvre (péké), le thym, le laurier, le poivre en grain et les baies de genevrier. Mettez-y les foies et laissez macérer pendant 2 à 3 heures.

Mettez les tranches de pain à tremper dans le lait. Pendant ce temps, faîtes fondre la graisse de canard ou le saindoux, et faîtes-y blondir les dés d'oignon.

Sortez les foies de la marinade, passez le liquide au chinois et conservez boules de condiment et feuilles. Mettez le liquide de la marinade dans les oignons, que vous laissez mijoter pour réduire pendant une dizaine de minutes.

En attendant, hachez les foies grossièrement au hachoir.

C'est le moment de préchauffer le four à 200°C (7).

Dans le grand saladier récupéré, mélangez le hachis de porc, de foie, le pain soigneusement éssoré, les oeufs. Egouttez les oignons, ajoutez les au mélange et rendez le tout bien homogène. Poivrez et salez.

Versez dans des terrines en terre cuite.

Garnissez avec les grains de poivre et de genevrier, ainsi que le laurier et le thym que vous avez mis de côté. Mettez au bain-marie dans le four, de 40 à 60 minutes, selon la taille de la terrine. Il faut que la croûte soit bien cuite en levant le couvercle.

Suggestions pour servir:

Laissez refroidir au moins 8 heures au frigo avant de déguster. On peut le servir en hors d'oeuvre, mis sur les tartines, c'est délicieux.

Si vous avez l'intention de conserver le pâté pendant plus de 2 jours, couvrez avec une couche de saindoux ou de beurre fondu.

Commentaires:

Vous pouvez mettre du gin si vous n'avez pas de genièvre. Vous avez un genevrier dans votre jardin? N'oubliez pas d'en mettre une branche dans la marinade, en lieu et place des baies.

Le choix de la bière influe naturellement sur le goût final: une Chimay sera plus amère, la Gueuze donne un gout plus aigre. C'est à vous de décider.

Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Voila!

Juniper berries!

"Commencez par enlevez les "nerfs" blancs dans les foies de lapin. Dans un grand saladier, mettez la bière, le genièvre (péké), le thym, le laurier, le poivre en grain et les baies de genevrier. Mettez-y les foies et laissez macérer pendant 2 à 3 heures.

For full transparency: The French text is essentially the same recipe, providing the first steps of making a rabbit pate, with references to essential ingredients, including the rabbit's liver, butter, juniper, thyme, bay leaves, pepper....

The list of ingredients in the URL is kind of confusing. Would a pate require as much as a half cup of juniper berries? Moreover, since "cl" is the unit of measure, liquid is suggested.

However, note the first comment: You could use gin instead if you don't have your peke. There are also comments about juniper in your garden etc.


Edited by Pontormo (log)

"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it looks like "baies de génévrier" refers to juniper berries and "10 cl de péké (1/2 tasse)" refers to gin.


Martin Mallet

<i>Poor but not starving student</i>

www.malletoyster.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Then what about genepy? Cf. Post #259 by Hathor.

I googled and found no sources that linked this Alpine drink to peke, but I did find links of wormwood and juniper. (Cf. Adam Balic's later post with French genepi.)


Edited by Pontormo (log)

"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the péké must refer to some type of juniper based alcohol for the maceration. Didn't Chufi mention a Dutch 'Genever' in one of her threads? I looked in the States and couldn't find it(didn't look too hard). It might be that. My Larousse doesn't mention it. I'd probably sub gin.


If only Jack Nicholson could have narrated my dinner, it would have been perfect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
it looks like "baies de génévrier" refers to juniper berries and "10 cl de péké (1/2 tasse)" refers to gin.

That's what I also get, with my admittedly extremely rusty college French. The amounts and measurement units do make a lot more sense that way, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do read my second post. I believe I am right in mentioning the liqueur that Hathor brought back from Northern Italy and the French version also shown in the link to the Italian regional forum, thanks to prompting of Mallet after my first doubtful post.

Here's a reference that Daniel Rogov, I am sure, could speak to at greater length: Scan the list of these imports until you reach "Peke'in."


"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For what it's worth, Carolyn, I got a whole lot of references to Creole when I goggled "recette" and "peke" since "peke-peke" apparently refers to brining or immersing something in salted or sugary water. You'll find recipes that call for papayas...and yes, lots of pictures of dogs!


"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

*cough*

PÉKÉ Palm wine.

baies de génévrier are juniper berries.


I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

edited twice, I should be more specific.

There is a pèkè alcool de genièvre also.

Look for pèkèt.

I keep thinking of new things to add. I'm pretty busy and not very focused here.

Anyway, have fun. :biggrin:


Edited by chefzadi (log)

I can be reached via email chefzadi AT gmail DOT com

Dean of Culinary Arts

Ecole de Cuisine: Culinary School Los Angeles

http://ecolecuisine.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...beaten to the post by ChefZadi...

cheers

Derek


Edited by DerekW (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I think the péké must refer to some type of juniper based alcohol for the maceration. Didn't Chufi mention a Dutch 'Genever' in one of her threads?

Spot on I think. Gin or 'genever' in Dutch.

My research seems to indicate that this recipe is originally Waloon from Belgium. So, although I can't find a rock hard reference, 'genievre' sounds like 'Waloonian' for that kind of gin to me.

let us know how it turns out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi I was wondering if you guys could translate something for me.

What kind of fish are

Cabillaud

Loup

St Pierre

and

Dorad

in english, because i have been fileting an d gutting these fish but i am not very familiar with them. Thanks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi I was wondering if you guys could translate something for me.

What kind of fish are

Cabillaud

Loup

St Pierre

and

Dorad

in english, because i have been fileting an d gutting these fish but i am not very familiar with them. Thanks!

CABILLAUD is COD

LOUP is CATFISH

DORADE is SEA BREAM

I'm not sure about St Pierre. If it's Saint Peter's Fish then I think it would be Tilapia in both English and French.


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

St Pierre is John Dory. So called because its spots are where St Peter pressed his thumb and finger when catching fish. Dorade is sea bream.

Not sure about the other two!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi I was wondering if you guys could translate something for me.

What kind of fish are

Cabillaud

Loup

St Pierre

and

Dorad

in english, because i have been fileting an d gutting these fish but i am not very familiar with them. Thanks!

Loup: sea bass

St. Pierre: John Dory

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi I was wondering if you guys could translate something for me.

What kind of fish are

Cabillaud

Loup

St Pierre

and

Dorad

in english, because i have been fileting an d gutting these fish but i am not very familiar with them. Thanks!

Loup: sea bass

St. Pierre: John Dory

Well, now you have all sorts of conflicting answers, so I guess we will have to wait for Pitipois to chime in.

The names I listed were found in a publication my work put out on fisheries which has an appendix that lists the French and English translations of hundreds of fish, many I have never heard of, so I would be surprised if they were not accurate, but you never know.

Here is a link that lists the same translations

http://www.inspection.gc.ca/english/anima/...nadahomee.shtml


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have found that fish names cause waiters more angst than any other category of food.

From our experience, Loup is translated as Sea Bass, and St. Pierre as John Dory. Way to go, Pork Belly!


eGullet member #80.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...