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tan319

Please Translate This! Help with Foreign Language Recipes, Culinary Terms, Labels

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Hi there,

Pulpo de cerdo. Sounds like some mysterious organ meats. Do tell what the recipe is for.

I have provided a link and photo of chile catarina, this may help in your search at the grocery store.

chile catarina

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Excuse me, it is pulpa de cerdo not pulpo and in parentheses cabeza do lomo so I'm beginning to understand that this cut must be the fore end of the loin.

The cleaning lady explained to me (sort of) that it is "carne puro" so no bones or fat but just pure meat

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Thanks, Shelora. I don't think I've ever seen a chile quite like that around here anywhere but will keep a watch for it.

The recipe is for a mole verde and another for Cerdo en salsa rustica.


Edited by BarbaraY (log)

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Excuse me, it is pulpa de cerdo not pulpo and in parentheses cabeza do lomo so I'm beginning to understand that this cut must be the fore end of the loin.

The cleaning lady explained to me (sort of) that it is "carne puro" so no bones or fat but just pure meat

Pulpa according to the dictionary is pulp, but your translation of cabeza de lomo makes sense.

If you are in need, perhaps your cleaning lady knows where you can get some chile catarina.

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I'd translate pulpa de cerdo as "pork flesh" or "pork meat," thus the boneless meat.

This is the correct answer! Andale!

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I believe pulpa originally referred to the flesh of fruits or vegetables, with the seeds, skins, husks, etc. removed. It has become generalized to flesh as well, and indicates flesh without skin, bones, or fat.

Theabroma


Sharon Peters aka "theabroma"

The lunatics have overtaken the asylum

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Thanks everyone for the input. Just couldn't find these terms in either of my dictionaries nor on a web search.

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I was just checking a facsimile of an 18th century cookbook for other reasons. they were using pulpa then for boneless meat. So I guess it goes back a way. Does anyone have ready access to the Corominas etymological dictionary?

Rachel


Rachel Caroline Laudan

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The chef who is doing our season premier Les Marmitonsevent on September 20th(PM me for info) is just 2 months in the country from Ireland and has submitted his menu which includes Roast veal fillet, pommes fondant, tempura oysters, sauce béarnaise. I am having trouble finding a decent definition of the Fondant part of Pommes Fondant. Can anyone give me an idea what this looks like? I originally thought "au Gratin" but why wouldn't he have just said au gratin??

Thanks, Eric


President

Les Marmitons-NJ

Johnson and Wales

Class of '85

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I think that the steamed potatoes are more what the original post implies ... :wink: with no mashing involved! Mystery solved!


Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"

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Fondre (literally, to melt) here means to cook the potatoes in fat in a covered pan with no added liquid. Traditionally the potatoes are peeled and trimmed into ovoids and cooked in butter. The technique can be used for other vegetables, like carrots.

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My school recipe for pommes fondant calls for cutting them into large tournee with one flat side and then placing them in a shallow pan flat-side-down. Add seasoned chicken stock up to the halfway point. Hit the top with melted butter and s&p, and bake in a moderate oven. Baste the tops with more melted butter every 10 minutes until the taters are tender. They're pretty good, but I'd prefer pommes boulanger or a gratin personally.

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My school recipe for pommes fondant calls for cutting them into large tournee with one flat side and then placing them in a shallow pan flat-side-down. Add seasoned chicken stock up to the halfway point. Hit the top with melted butter and s&p, and bake in a moderate oven. Baste the tops with more melted butter every 10 minutes until the taters are tender. They're pretty good, but I'd prefer pommes boulanger or a gratin personally.

Another way we produce fondant, is to cut into cylinders appx 3cm high and 2-3cm round, chanfer the edges so they dont catch. place greasproof paper on the bottom of the pan, cover with clarified butter and "confit" until tender, these can then be removed and refrigerated, and providing you haven't let the butter boil you can re-use it. when you need it colour on both sides (preferably in a non-stick pan) and warm through in a low oven, finish with a little fleur de sel.


after all these years in a kitchen, I would have thought it would become 'just a job'

but not so, spending my time playing not working

www.e-senses.co.uk

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Fondant Potatoes as originally stated in the Rep de la Cuisine, says butter and white stock shaped like Chateau Potatoes(As does Larousse) or Mashed baked shaped as an oval ball and browned with butter!

My prefrence is to hash the top start in butter and add a dark (not white) beef stock when they start softening add a little stock when its gone all sticky add a little more stock if the potatoes aren't cooked turning half way through finishing on the hashed side so they keep there shape and have a larger area for the buttery beef coating thats been left on them. Oxo works brill for these though careful of salt content!

Where has this just cooking in butter come from, why not saute! Given a choice I'd have my version or saute just IMO!


Perfection cant be reached, but it can be strived for!

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My husband would like to try making a family cookie recipe. The recipe is all in German, and for the most part he can translate it (he's not into cooking, so that's the limitation). What we're not sure about is what the equivalent would be here in the U.S.

can anyone help? Here are the ingredients in question:

250g Schmalz (fat, but what kind?)

400g braunen Sirup (is this molassas?)

200g süße Sahne (heavy or whipping cream?)

15g Pottasche (not sure what this is)

süße Mandeln (I've not seen anything but regular almonds - what is this?)

Pfefferkuchengewürz (special gingerbread type spice mix - but what is in it? can I make a mix up on my own?)

Thanks!!

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Schmalz is rendered chicken fat. Easy to make on your own. You could probably sub duck fat or shortening, but the flavor and mouthfeel of the end product would be different.

potash (pottasche) in cooking is potassium carbonate. You can sub sodium carbonate (baking soda) at a rate of 84% by weight.

For sweet cream, heavy and whipping cream are the same, I believe.

As for Pfefferkuchengewürz, the Babelfish just called it pepper cake spice, so I'm at a loss. The german wikipedia has this entry, but my translation skills are much better in Japanese or Spanish than German.

Edit to add: the Wikipedia comes through! Pfeffperkuchengewurz:

35 g cinnamon

2 g allspice

2g coriander

2g ginger

1g cardomom

1g nutmeg

1g mace


Edited by jsolomon (log)

I always attempt to have the ratio of my intelligence to weight ratio be greater than one. But, I am from the midwest. I am sure you can now understand my life's conundrum.

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Schmalz is rendered chicken fat.  Easy to make on your own.  You could probably sub duck fat or shortening, but the flavor and mouthfeel of the end product would be different.

Not sure this is necessairly the case. What I find under the name "Schmalz", when I visit my local supermarket here in Germany, is usually rendered pig fat and not chicken. Never seen chicken around here, while goose fat (Gänseschmalz) is quite common.


Il Forno: eating, drinking, baking... mostly side effect free. Italian food from an Italian kitchen.

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Would you really use chicken/goose fat for cookies though? Hmm...

thanks for your help!

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süße Mandeln

just for a goof I entered German Almonds into Yahoo.....they seem to be sweet/spiced roasted almonds ...like at a fair

T


The great thing about barbeque is that when you get hungry 3 hours later....you can lick your fingers

Maxine

Avoid cutting yourself while slicing vegetables by getting someone else to hold them while you chop away.

"It is the government's fault, they've eaten everything."

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