Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Suvir Saran

The Tarte Tatin Topic

Recommended Posts

Cause it was upturned from the baking pie dish onto a serving platter.

i gotta enroll in those mind reading courses again

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cause it was upturned from the baking pie dish onto a serving platter.

i gotta enroll in those mind reading courses again

I was trained to understand it as paying attention. Not mind reaidng.

The pics posted are Great. :smile:

In fact even the towel that could have been used in the turning process is shown.

For those with a trained eye, that is another great proof that the man taking the pics really did prepare it themselves (Or at least someone in that setting where the pic was taken may have).:smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Suvir, im sorry for making a mistake. i didnt catch the towel in the turning process.

Both pics have 2 different containers, one appears to have walnuts or pecans in it and the other doesn't. i dont think I was being completely wacko in thinking they were possibly two different batches. But again, maybe I was. in which case, what the hell was I thinking,,,I guess im not that samrt... :smile:


Edited by awbrig (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Suvir, im sorry for making a mistake. i didnt catch the towel in the turning process.

Both pics have 2 different containers, one appears to have walnuts or pecans in it and the other doesn't.  i dont think I was being completely wacko in thinking they were possibly two different batches.  But again, maybe I was.  in which case, what the hell was I thinking,,,I guess im not that samrt... :smile:

Awbrig,

Tarte Tatin is like an upside down cake. Remember those? They are an American confection. :smile:

You should at least be familiar with those sweet man.

A tarte tatin is prepared in a skillet or pan.. and then upturned onto a platter. In doing so, the crust that you see on the top (first pic) goes to the bottom in the serving platter. In doing that, the apples and in this case also the pecans, come to the top (second pic).

It is not that difficult. But I guess it is simpler once you have made them. They are delicious. Have you never eaten a tarte tatin? Maybe CT can have their pastry chef make you one and also give you a demo. I am sure for all the work you do promoting him on eGullet, that is the least he can do:raz:

The 2 pics have different containers for one is the container in which the tarte tatin was baked and the other is the platter in which it is being served. :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not to lose the topic... FoodMan, thanks for the pics... Your tarte tatin looks delicious. Thanks for sharing the pic... You are very naughty though.. Now I am craving a bite. :angry:

Maybe Mlpc, or one of the other pastry chefs we have here can share their own experiences with this dessert. Mine unfortunately are based on what you did.

I learned how to make pastries from Julia Child (through her books). :shock:

And I thank her every day. :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks you for the excellent expalnation Suvir. It is true Awbrig the blue one is the one where the tarte was baked in and the second one (white) is the one it was inverted into for serving.

How did you like its taste? What would you want to do differently? I know you said make the dough thinnner... But what else? What did you eat it with? I have enjoyed it with creme fraiche or even plain ole vanilla ice cream or just by itself.

What kind of crust did you use?

I absolutely loved its buttery caramely taste Suvir and the crunchy pecans were a delectable addition. As to what I would do different I mentioned making the pastry THICKER not thinner. I know it looks pretty thick in the pic but it is actually pretty thin especially in the center (Julia said to role the dough to a 1/8 inch thickness, I might do a 1/4 inch next time). The other thing I might try and do is to get more color on the apples maybe by cooking a tad longer or even caramelizing the apples with some sugar under the broiler (Julia mentions that as well). I served it with a some Breyers French Vanilla ice cream, creme fraiche would also be great but I had no homemade at the moment. As for the pastry I also used what Julia asks for in the recipe --"Pate Brisee Sucree" or Sweet Short Paste.

Thanks for all the comments

FM


Edited by FoodMan (log)

E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks you for the excellent expalnation Suvir. It is true Awbrig the blue one is the one where the tarte was baked in and the second one (white) is the one it was inverted into for serving.
How did you like its taste? What would you want to do differently? I know you said make the dough thinnner... But what else? What did you eat it with? I have enjoyed it with creme fraiche or even plain ole vanilla ice cream or just by itself.

What kind of crust did you use?

I absolutely loved its buttery caramely taste Suvir and the crunchy pecans were a delectable addition. As to what I would do different I mentioned making the pastry THICKER not thinner. I know it looks pretty thick in the pic but it is actually pretty thin especially in the center (Julia said to role the dough to a 1/8 inch thickness, I might do a 1/4 inch next time). The other thing I might try and do is to get more color on the apples maybebe cooking a tad longer or even caramelizing the apples with some sugar under the broiler (Julia mentions that as well). I served it with a some Breyers French Vanilla ice cream, creme fraiche would also be great but I had no homemade at the moment. As for the pastry I also used what Julia asks for in the recipe --"Pate Brisee Sucree" or Sweet Short Paste.

Thanks for all the comments

FM

You are quite the tarte tatin man already! :shock:

See, it is easy to become a convert.

It is so simple and yet so addictive.

I too love it for that very smooth texture and yet the very rich caramel flavor.

If you follow Julias recipe, you must have certainly added some lemon, I love that hint of lemon in the apples... I actually add zest as well.

And I happen to be a fan of very thin crust. It is just enough for me to have a slight hint of something cruncy, but not to have it too dense. But that is very individual. I can imagine that it could taste just as great to another with a thicker dough.

I have made it as you do... using Pate Brisee Sucree and also with puff pastry. Both have their own place.

I cook it as per Julias timing and get a darker caramel that I absolutely adore.

I am sure when Mlpc and the other professionals see this, they will teach us both many other subtle nuances.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you follow Julias recipe, you must have certainly added some lemon, I love that hint of lemon in the apples... I actually add zest as well.

And I happen to be a fan of very thin crust. It is just enough for me to have a slight hint of something cruncy, but not to have it too dense. But that is very individual. I can imagine that it could taste just as great to another with a thicker dough.

I have made it as you do... using Pate Brisee Sucree and also with puff pastry. Both have their own place.

Actually I expected Julia to ask for tossing the apples in lemon juice but in the recipe that I used from "Mastering the Art... Volume I" she only asks for tossing them in sugar and optional cinnamon. Since it was my first TT I did not want to stray from the recipe and decided to use lemon juice on my second try (lemon zest sounds good too).

Before reading this thread and Julia's recipe I thought all TT are made with puff pastry. but since julia's recipe asks for "Pate Brisee Sucre" I assumed that this is the more traditional. Am I correct in this assumption?

FM


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Tarte Tatin recipe in my book Suvir, you should try it out.

I use a combination of Granny Smiths and Goldens, or Cortland apples, and I use pate brisee instead of feuilletee.

A good trick for Tatin is to let it sit a while once baked for the juices to firm up before inverting the pan. You can also let it cool completely, and then heat it lightly on the stove when ready to flip it. Just never flip it when it's hot because the apples sometimes render quite a bit of juice.

I'd add a vanilla bean to the base caramel and I think I bake it for a while before adding the crust.

Boy, I can't remember the details. It's been a while since I made one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope Awbrig is not upset with me. :sad:

Awbrig, your playing innocent, and pretending to make a mistake (or maybe you did make a genuine mistake. Glad to know I am not alone in being fallible), gave me the opportunity to share what I knew about Tarte Tatin.

I hope I have not teased you too much. That was not meant to be the intent.

Do you like Tarte Tatin? I do.

Maybe I can make you one someday... They are great. :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have a Tarte Tatin recipe in my book Suvir, you should try it out.

I use a combination of Granny Smiths and Goldens, or Cortland apples, and I use pate brisee instead of feuilletee.

A good trick for Tatin is to let it sit a while once baked for the juices to firm up before inverting the pan. You can also let it cool completely, and then heat it lightly on the stove when ready to flip it. Just never flip it when it's hot because the apples sometimes render quite a bit of juice.

I'd add a vanilla bean to the base caramel and I think I bake it for a while before adding the crust.

Boy, I can't remember the details. It's been a while since I made one.

Thanks Lesley! :smile:

Do you know off hand what the classic crust would have been made with? What kind of pastry?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought Tarte Tatin was a planet from Star Wars... :smile: just kidding I have to try this out soon! thanks...


Edited by awbrig (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I thought Tarte Tatin was a planet from Star Wars... :smile: just kidding I have to try this out soon! thanks...

You are a good sport! :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just pulled out my copy of Larousse Gastronomique. It calls for shortcrust pastry. In fact a French friend that comes from the same town as the Tatin sisters, also makes a very short crust... and his TT is one of the best I have ever eaten.

But I have seen many chefs do it with Puff pastry in the US. Especially at the "fancier" restaurants.

The Gastronomique calls Tarte Tatin:

"The name given to an apple tart that is cooked under a lid of pastry, but served with the pastry underneath and the fruit on top."

Edit: corrected spelling of fruit. :rolleyes:


Edited by Suvir Saran (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I just pulled out my copy of Larousse Gastronomique.  It calls for shortcrust pastry.  In fact a French friend that comes from the same town as the Tatin sisters, also makes a very short crust... and his TT is one of the best I have ever eaten.

But I have seen many chefs do it with Puff pastry in the US.  Especially at the "fancier" restaurants.

The Gastronomique calls Tarte Tatin:

"The name given to an apple tart that is cooked under a lid of pastry, but served with the pastry underneath and the fuit on top."

I guess Pate Brisee Sucre it is.

Thanks Suvir.

FM

*note to self add "Larousse Gastronomique" to Christmas wish list*


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I just pulled out my copy of Larousse Gastronomique. It calls for shortcrust pastry. In fact a French friend that comes from the same town as the Tatin sisters, also makes a very short crust... and his TT is one of the best I have ever eaten.

That is my understanding too. Shortcrust pastry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

People, people hold on here!

Pate brisee and pate sucree are not the same thing!

Pate brisee is flaky pastry and pate sucree is shortcrust pastry.

I wouldn't use pate sucree for a tarte Tatin. Brisee is better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm of the group who prefers puff pastry for my tarte tatin, however I bake the pastry on its own and not on top of the apples as I find baking it on the apples it never gets as crispy and sometimes tends to be doughy in the center (anyone else experience this or is it just lame-old me?). So I bake them separately then I invert the apples onto the pastry lined serving platter.

Gee, Suvir, you sure have started something here...I'm absolutely DYING for a tarte tatin now!


kit

"I'm bringing pastry back"

Weebl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is my all time favourite recipe. It makes me feel I can bake :biggrin:

I like creating savoury ones as well with caramelised onions.

The master of Tarte Tatin is Chef Michel Roux who gave me permission to reproduce his recipe on my site:

Tarte des Demoiselles Tatin (Upside-down Apple Tart) - http://www.hub-uk.com/foodpages07/recip0313.htm

I learnt to cook it from this article:

http://www.hub-uk.com/tallyrecip02/recipe0051.htm

And from that I created my own savoury recipe, Hub Leek Tarte Tatin:

http://www.hub-uk.com/foodpages20/recip0979.htm

but I now prefer using onions to leeks!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Gee, Suvir, you sure have started something here...I'm absolutely DYING for a tarte tatin now!

I can eat Tarte Tatin just about anytime.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I can eat Tarte Tatin just about anytime.

Well, you are welcome over anytime! Just give me a few hours notice!


kit

"I'm bringing pastry back"

Weebl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I can eat Tarte Tatin just about anytime.

Well, you are welcome over anytime! Just give me a few hours notice!

What city/state do I need to be in to avail this welcome? :biggrin:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I can eat Tarte Tatin just about anytime.

Well, you are welcome over anytime! Just give me a few hours notice!

What city/state do I need to be in to avail this welcome? :biggrin:

To be specific, Belmont Heights in Long Beach, California. :cool:

D'ya have a trip west in the works?


kit

"I'm bringing pastry back"

Weebl

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

:angry:

Second try at this damn dish: the first time I incinerated it (practically), the second time its underdone. The problem seems to be the amount of time it's cooking on the stovetop, I think. Anyone got any idea how long its got to cook up there, and what's the clue that tells when when to get it in the oven?

Thanks, in anticipation!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By apilinariosilvia
      Can anyone give me idea how to make homemade french bread in wood fired oven?
    • By pastrygirl
      There are two local grocery stores here who I'd like to try to sell chocolate to but they have policies forbidding GMO soy,  Soy lecithin is allowed only if organic or certified non-GMO. 
       
      I use a lot of Felchlin, some Valrhona, a little Cacao Barry. The only mention of GMOs I've found from Felchlin is this note in a brochure: GMO absence:  Felchlin fulfills current legislative requirements regarding GMO absence.  All Felchlin products comply with the Swiss Regulation and the European Council Regulation related to genetically modified organisms in food and feed.
       
      Does anybody know what those requirements are?  Is anything European going to be GMO-free?  Or labeled above some %?
       
       
    • By umami5
      Has anyone come across a digital version of Practical Professional Cookery (revised 3rd edition) H.L. Cracknell & R.J. Kaufmann.
      I am using this as the textbook for my culinary arts students and a digital version would come in very handy for creating notes and handouts.
    • By Mullinix18
      I dont believe that any English translation of Carêmes works exist. An incomplete version was published in 1842 (I think) but even the that version seems lackluster for the few recipes it does cover. I think it's time the world looks to its past, but I don't speak great French and it's a huge task to undertake. I hopefully plan on publishing this work and anyone who helps me will get a very fair cut, and if we decide not to publish it, I'll put it out on the internet for free. I'm working in Google docs so we can collaborate. I'm first cataloging the index to cross reference the pre-existing incomplete English version to give us a reference of what yet needs to be done, and from there we will go down the list of recipies and Translate them one by one. Simple google translate goes only so far, as it is 1700s French culinary terms and phrases being used. I'd like to preserve as much of Carêmes beautiful and flowery language as possible. Who's with me? 
    • By Mullinix18
      I have seen referenced in several places on the internet, including Wikipedia, a stat about escoffier recommending 40 minutes for scrambled eggs in a Bain Marie. I cant find where this number is from. On Wikipedia it refers to the book I currently own, the "Escoffier le guide culinaire" with forward by Heston Blumenthal by h. L. Cracknell...specificly page 157 for the 40 minute cooking time of scrambled eggs but it's not in my book on that page! Even tho there is the recipe for scrambled eggs on that page... I've seen the 1903 first edition online.. And it's not in there either.... Where is this number from?? Id like to know in case there is some even more complete book or something out there that I'm missing. Any help would be much appreciated. Thank you. 
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...