Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

My FIRST BATCH of hard salami


Recommended Posts

Hello to all... At this stage of my dry salami making I'm afraid I have more questions than I'm entitled to. However any help I receive will be most appreciated.

1.   I followed directions on the 5 lb. batch as well as I was able... Three weeks into this I have achieved about 43% reduction in weight on all links. I use a wine fridge to cure.. My neighbor took one link home at the same time and just "hung it in his refrigerator" with no special settings for humidity or temperature... This one came out IDENTICAL to all the rest in appearance and weight reduction of 43%. How can this be?

2.   I put the left over Mold 600 in a bowl in with the drying salami links. Is this good or not good ?

3.   Now  that desired weight has been achieved is further aging beneficial?

Thanks so much for offering a site like this... All the best to all of you...

Joe Wood

3WEEK SALAMI 1.jpg

3 WEEK SALAMI 2.jpg

  • Like 6
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

1 - assuming your curing chamber wasn't too cold, you fermented your salami; your neighbour dehydrated his (because not much fermentation happening at 4 degrees Celsius). There should be a difference in taste.

2 - doesn't make much difference. Did you soak your casings in non-chlorinated water, and mix your M-600 with lukewarm non-chlorinated water? That makes a difference.

3 - I'd say there was no point taking them further. That's at the upper end of weight loss for most formulations.

Hong Kong Dave

O que nao mata engorda.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
On 8/9/2020 at 3:27 AM, HKDave said:

1 - assuming your curing chamber wasn't too cold, you fermented your salami; your neighbour dehydrated his (because not much fermentation happening at 4 degrees Celsius). There should be a difference in taste.

2 - doesn't make much difference. Did you soak your casings in non-chlorinated water, and mix your M-600 with lukewarm non-chlorinated water? That makes a difference.

3 - I'd say there was no point taking them further. That's at the upper end of weight loss for most formulations.

I did soak  the casings in chlorine free water and rinsed  them in same. As for taste difference I never got o taste his but he liked it a lot.

Do you have a preference of percentage for weight loss in salami?

Link to post
Share on other sites

NO MORE AIR POCKETS IN MY HARD SALAMI...

After seeing several air pockets forming while stuffing 55 mm collagen middles I came up with the idea of pricking the casings BEFORE filling them as opposed to after... The result was ZERO air pockets and easier filling of the casings... I was making a thirteen lb.batch of hard salami . I heard a lot of talk about using a coarse grind so I did that too {3/8}... I also hand diced the nearly frozen fat to achieve better definition in final product {read that on a blog too}.. All is in the curing chamber after 72 hrs. fermentation time... Again I saw somewhere that a long cure is better {?}

13 lbs. salami.jpg

  • Like 3
  • Delicious 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

@Joe Wood 

 

fine work    thank you for sharing .

 

do we get a glimpse of the cut salami ?

 

I envy your hobby and your diligence.

 

I also like your thermometer  .  I had one similar if not exactly the same

 

back when.

Edited by rotuts (log)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you using a wine fridge for your curing? I'm contemplating picking up a dorm room sized fridge for the same purpose, but I don't know if I can keep the temp warm enough. Any input?

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the greatest respect for the guys who've been doing this a long time... However I don't have their knowledge on the subject... But here's what I did:

 

I temp. controlled the batch as best I could in a wine cooler... Yet I was surprised that my batch came out identical  to the piece I gave to a friend  to cure in his fridge which ran at fridge temp {near 40% ?}... We both achieved the same weight reduction  at the same time...   

I like doing this so much that I might buy a second wine cooler so I can have more curing at the same time... Found one on Craigs List for $100.00... I'm not familiar with the dorm fridges...

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
On 8/2/2020 at 5:21 PM, Joe Wood said:

Hello to all... At this stage of my dry salami making I'm afraid I have more questions than I'm entitled to. However any help I receive will be most appreciated.

1.   I followed directions on the 5 lb. batch as well as I was able... Three weeks into this I have achieved about 43% reduction in weight on all links. I use a wine fridge to cure.. My neighbor took one link home at the same time and just "hung it in his refrigerator" with no special settings for humidity or temperature... This one came out IDENTICAL to all the rest in appearance and weight reduction of 43%. How can this be?

2.   I put the left over Mold 600 in a bowl in with the drying salami links. Is this good or not good ?

3.   Now  that desired weight has been achieved is further aging beneficial?

Thanks so much for offering a site like this... All the best to all of you...

Joe Wood

3WEEK SALAMI 1.jpg

3 WEEK SALAMI 2.jpg

 

A QUESTION FOR THE MORE EXPERIENCED... {THE PROS}

I put up a batch of salami about three weeks ago... I was expecting the shrinkage to take about six weeks... I've reached the desired weight loss of 35 % in only three weeks...

What do I do now to continue ageing it without it shrinking further?

Thanks to anyone who has an answer... Joe Wood

 

Edited by Joe Wood (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/2/2020 at 5:21 PM, Joe Wood said:

Hello to all... At this stage of my dry salami making I'm afraid I have more questions than I'm entitled to. However any help I receive will be most appreciated.

1.   I followed directions on the 5 lb. batch as well as I was able... Three weeks into this I have achieved about 43% reduction in weight on all links. I use a wine fridge to cure.. My neighbor took one link home at the same time and just "hung it in his refrigerator" with no special settings for humidity or temperature... This one came out IDENTICAL to all the rest in appearance and weight reduction of 43%. How can this be?

2.   I put the left over Mold 600 in a bowl in with the drying salami links. Is this good or not good ?

3.   Now  that desired weight has been achieved is further aging beneficial?

Thanks so much for offering a site like this... All the best to all of you...

Joe Wood

3WEEK SALAMI 1.jpg

3 WEEK SALAMI 2.jpg

I guess flavor is what I'm after...  Everything I've read says 6 weeks or so for best results... Is this correct? And if so do I continue to leave it in the curing chamber {wine cooler} ? Or do I move it to somewhere else?

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

The recipes in Ruhlman and Polcyn's "Charcuterie", to cite one widely-used beginner book, are in the 2-3 week range for 30% weight loss in hog casings (which I think you're using? hard to tell from the photo), and maybe a week more for something in beef middles. And that agrees with what you've just found.

 

In the real world, the time will vary with the amount of moisture in the recipe, the humidity of the cure room, and the diameter of the casings, so that's why we weigh.

  • Like 1

Hong Kong Dave

O que nao mata engorda.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the info... Yes I used hog casings...  I agree with you on all points... Once the desired weight is achieved what do others do at that time?  Is it advisable to continue the cure or is it time to vac-pac?  Or something else? Thanks in advance... Joe Wood

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Joe Wood said:

Once the desired weight is achieved what do others do at that time?  Is it advisable to continue the cure or is it time to vac-pac? 

 

If the product has been hanging long enough to have cured and you're now at the weight you want,  I'd suggest the next step is to taste it. If you're happy with the result, vac-pack.

Hong Kong Dave

O que nao mata engorda.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you I will do exactly that... I find this rather exciting because I can reduce my original start to finish time from six weeks to four (ish)... l live on Cape Cod but spend winters in Florida... I plan to bring salami with me when I migrate this fall... Joe Wood 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

HKDave... Thanks again for your input... I really want to produce some cracked black pepper coated salamis... But I'm not about to pay five or six dollars for ONE pre-peppered casing... Are you familiar with using a light wash of mustard  and rolling the salami in pepper once the mustard gets tacky?. This is something I'm familiar with from smoking meat such as briskets or ribs... It worked well to hold the dry rub from falling off and didn't effect the taste... I just used simple generic yellow mustard...

I also watched a video of someone cooking a combination of plain gelatin, karo syrup, and water into a slurry which was then painted on the salami and of course then being rolled in the cracked pepper... I'd love to hear of any other methods anyone may have to offer....

Joe Wood

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 8/2/2020 at 5:21 PM, Joe Wood said:

Hello to all... At this stage of my dry salami making I'm afraid I have more questions than I'm entitled to. However any help I receive will be most appreciated.

1.   I followed directions on the 5 lb. batch as well as I was able... Three weeks into this I have achieved about 43% reduction in weight on all links. I use a wine fridge to cure.. My neighbor took one link home at the same time and just "hung it in his refrigerator" with no special settings for humidity or temperature... This one came out IDENTICAL to all the rest in appearance and weight reduction of 43%. How can this be?

2.   I put the left over Mold 600 in a bowl in with the drying salami links. Is this good or not good ?

3.   Now  that desired weight has been achieved is further aging beneficial?

Thanks so much for offering a site like this... All the best to all of you...

Joe Wood

3WEEK SALAMI 1.jpg

3 WEEK SALAMI 2.jpg

 

Below is a picture of my second batch of hard salami... This is the batch where I hand diced the 20% fat to achieve more definition... Not my idea... I saw it on line but kinda like it...1034737137_SALAMIBATCHII2.thumb.jpg.7d77bb39e529f6708ac719d5d912df31.jpg

Edited by Joe Wood (log)
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By DanM
      Normally, the local market has bresaola in tissue paper thin slices. Today they also had packages in small dice, probably the leftover ends, bits and pieces. Any thoughts on how to enjoy them, besides nibbling on it? 
       
      Thank you!
    • By kayb
      Linguine with Squash, Goat Cheese and Bacon
      Serves 4 as Main Dishor 6 as Side.
      I stumbled on this while looking for recipes with goat cheese. It's from Real Simple (and it is!). I couldn't imagine the combination of flavors, but it was wonderful.

      6 slices bacon
      1 2- to 2 ½-pound butternut squash—peeled, seeded, and diced (4 to 5 cups)
      2 cloves garlic, minced
      1-1/2 c chicken broth
      1 tsp kosher salt
      4 oz soft goat cheese, crumbled
      1 lb linguine, cooked
      1 T olive oil
      2 tsp freshly ground black pepper

      Cook the bacon in a large skillet over medium heat until crisp, about 5 minutes. Drain on a paper towel, then crumble or break into pieces; set aside. Drain all but about 2 tablespoons of the bacon fat from the skillet. Add the squash and garlic to the skillet and sauté over medium heat for 3 to 5 minutes. Stir in the broth and salt. Cover and simmer, stirring occasionally, until the squash is cooked through and softened, 20 to 25 minutes. Add half the goat cheese and stir well to combine. Place the cooked linguine in a large bowl. Stir the sauce into the linguine and toss well to coat. Drizzle with the olive oil and add the reserved bacon, the remaining goat cheese, and the pepper. Serve immediately.
      Keywords: Main Dish, Easy, Vegetables, Dinner
      ( RG2158 )
    • By phatj
      Duck Leg Confit Potstickers
      Serves 4 as Appetizer.
      These are seriously decadent potstickers.
      I devised this recipe as part of a Duck Three Ways dinner wherein over the course of three days I dismantled a whole duck using various parts for various things, including rendering fat, making stock and confiting the legs. If you're super-ambitious and do it my way, you'll have duck stock and duck fat on hand as this recipe calls for; otherwise, substitute chicken stock and peanut oil or whatever you have on hand.

      2 confited duck legs, bones discarded and meat shredded
      2 c sliced shiitake caps
      1/2 c sliced scallions
      splash fish sauce
      1 tsp grated fresh ginger
      1 tsp grated fresh garlic
      pinch Five Spice powder
      pot sticker wrappers
      3 c duck stock
      3 T duck fat

      1. Saute shiitakes in duck fat over high heat until most liquid has evaporated and they are beginning to brown.
      Meanwhile, reduce about 1 C duck stock in a small saucepan over medium heat until it's almost syrupy in consistency and tastes sweet.
      Also, warm a couple of cups of unreduced duck stock over low heat in another saucepan.
      2. Combine mushrooms, duck meat, scallions, fish sauce, ginger, garlic and Five Spice powder in a bowl.
      3. Place a teaspoon or so of the duck mixture in the center of a potsticker wrapper; wet half of the edge with water and seal, pinching and pleating one side.
      If you prepare more potstickers than you're going to want to eat, they can be frozen on cookie sheets then put into freezer bags for later.
      4. When all potstickers are sealed, heat a flat-bottomed pan over medium-high heat, melt enough duck fat to thinly cover the bottom, then add the potstickers.
      5. Cook undisturbed until the bottoms are browned, 3-5 minutes, then enough unreduced duck stock to cover the bottom of the pan about 1/2 inch deep and cover the pan.
      6. Cook until most liquid is absorbed, then uncover and cook until remaining liquid evaporates.
      While potstickers are cooking, make a dipping sauce by combining the reduced duck stock 1:1 with soy sauce, then adding a little rice vinegar, brown sugar (if the duck stock isn't sweet enough), and sesame oil.
      Serve potstickers immediately when done.
      Keywords: Hors d'oeuvre, Appetizer, Intermediate, Duck, Dinner, Chinese
      ( RG2052 )
    • By Domestic Goddess
      Longganisa (Filipino breakfast sausage)

      1 kg ground pork (make sure it is fatty ground pork)
      1 medium onion finely chopped/minced
      4 T vinegar (white vinegar or any strong vinegar)
      2 T soy sauce
      2 tsp salt
      2 tsp pepper
      4 T brown sugar
      1 T paprika for coloring (most Filipinos add red food dye)
      6 cloves garlic, finely minced

      In a large clean bowl, mix everything up really well. Stuff into casings or make patties or finger-sized rolls for skinless longganisa. Let the meat cure for 6 hours or overnight before frying (I usually don't since I am too excited to eat them).
      Best served with garlic fried rice on the side with sunny-side eggs.
      Keywords: Main Dish, Filipino, Easy, Pork, Breakfast
      ( RG1944 )
    • By Pam R
      Chicken and Apple Sausages
      A little experimenting resulted in some tasty chicken sausages.

      200 g chicken skin and fat
      1 kg chicken meat (2 breasts and 6 or 7 thighs)
      18 g kosher salt
      2-1/2 g black pepper
      2 g allspice (I added some more after a taste test - but didn't measure)
      2 g onion powder
      8 sage leaves (and added another 4 after taste test)
      230 g Granny Smith Apple, peeled and diced (2 apples)

      ( RG1971 )
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...