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Professional Soft Serve Ice Cream


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Hi Everyone,

 

I am new here and just joined the forum. I have been searching, googling around for a solution to find a recipe for a Professional Soft Serve machine (No Luck). From a couple of forums I have found that a typical ice cream custard can not be used in a soft serve machine because the beater causes it to turn to butter. I will be purchasing a soft serve machine within a month so want to be prepared beforehand with a nice recipe so I can offer my clients soft serve made from real milk rather than using soft serve powders originating out of China. Can anyone help with a recipe for Vanilla and Chocolate and more derivatives and exciting flavors because as i see now a days ice cream is a dying breed. I do know that a stabilizers needed to be added to the soft serve so please try and post the recipe in grams rather than percentages. Thanks All

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One small clarification: it would seem that it is't professional soft ice cream you want, but commercialy soft serve. Soft served may be made several different ways by a professional, but what you are talking about is commercially produced (that's not a bad thing either).

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Digging through my books on the many ice cream classes I have taken here is a bases to start with.

 

A formula that is slightly higher in fat (Rich) soft serve formula might look like:
 
6% milkfat
13% nonfat milk solids
13% sugar 
0.5% stabilizers and emulsifiers
 
So that the mix has about 32.5% total solids.
 
This might translate into 
 
91g heavy cream, homogenized (35% fat)
702g whole milk, homogenized (4% fat)
65.6g nonfat skim milk powder
111g sugar
0.5g xanthan gum
0.5g locust bean gum
0.1g kappa carrageenan
8g egg yolk
infused flavors as desired.
 
This must be played around with until the desired product is reached,
 
You might want to also check to see if Migoya of the CIA has published anything that might be of help.
 
Carlton Brooks CCE, CEPC
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One small clarification: it would seem that it is't professional soft ice cream you want, but commercialy soft serve. Soft served may be made several different ways by a professional, but what you are talking about is commercially produced (that's not a bad thing either).

Hi Stark, yes you are correct I am looking for commercial Soft Serve recipes, but sometimes using that word tends to sway the direction in most cases towards either powdered solutions or ready-made liquids. I would want to able to offer a product that customers can differentiate immediately from other soft serve. 

 

 

Digging through my books on the many ice cream classes I have taken here is a bases to start with.

 

A formula that is slightly higher in fat (Rich) soft serve formula might look like:
 
6% milkfat
13% nonfat milk solids
13% sugar 
0.5% stabilizers and emulsifiers
 
So that the mix has about 32.5% total solids.
 
This might translate into 
 
91g heavy cream, homogenized (35% fat)
702g whole milk, homogenized (4% fat)
65.6g nonfat skim milk powder
111g sugar
0.5g xanthan gum
0.5g locust bean gum
0.1g kappa carrageenan
8g egg yolk
infused flavors as desired.
 
This must be played around with until the desired product is reached,
 
You might want to also check to see if Migoya of the CIA has published anything that might be of help.
 
Carlton Brooks CCE, CEPC

 

 

Thank you soo much Carlton for the recipe, will give it a shot once i get my hands on a commercial machine. A few questions though:

 

1. Does the base need to be heated? to say 85 C or should it just be mixed and thrown in the machine? Heating might give a more creamier or denser soft serve maybe? right

 

2. is it possible to omit the eggs by increasing the stabilizers? 

 

Thanks again; will definitely share the results once i get to that stage. 

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In regards to question 1. I have done it both ways. The results though similar had slight taste variations, I thought that the creaminess in the product had more to do with the % of cream I used more than anything else.. Also if adding fruit purees I heated it and it produced a good product.

 

Question 2. I never tried replacing the egg yolk. I would think that the yolk adds it own distinct quality to the product. I would also prefer to add less stabilizers to the product.

 

I have also experimented with a soft serve machine using gelato style formulas. I have had some success. The product comes out a little firmer than a soft serve. There are many good European made powders bases for gelato. Check out PreGel America as will as the Pernogotti line. 

 

Carlton

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  • 2 years later...
On 5/22/2014 at 6:05 AM, carltonb said:

In regards to question 1. I have done it both ways. The results though similar had slight taste variations, I thought that the creaminess in the product had more to do with the % of cream I used more than anything else.. Also if adding fruit purees I heated it and it produced a good product.

 

Question 2. I never tried replacing the egg yolk. I would think that the yolk adds it own distinct quality to the product. I would also prefer to add less stabilizers to the product.

 

I have also experimented with a soft serve machine using gelato style formulas. I have had some success. The product comes out a little firmer than a soft serve. There are many good European made powders bases for gelato. Check out PreGel America as will as the Pernogotti line. 

 

Carlton

 

Hi Carlton-

Thank you for sharing this formula.  

 

Can you share the method?  I've never worked with the gums listed- or any gums for that matter.  

 

Guessing it's pasteurized yolks since heating isn't required?  If you add fruit purees, how hot do you get the mixture?  

Thank you!

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On May 20, 2014 at 1:57 PM, carltonb said:

Digging through my books on the many ice cream classes I have taken here is a bases to start with.

 

A formula that is slightly higher in fat (Rich) soft serve formula might look like:
 
6% milkfat
13% nonfat milk solids
13% sugar 
0.5% stabilizers and emulsifiers
 
So that the mix has about 32.5% total solids.
 
This might translate into 
 
91g heavy cream, homogenized (35% fat)
702g whole milk, homogenized (4% fat)
65.6g nonfat skim milk powder
111g sugar
0.5g xanthan gum
0.5g locust bean gum
0.1g kappa carrageenan
8g egg yolk
infused flavors as desired.
 
This must be played around with until the desired product is reached,
 
You might want to also check to see if Migoya of the CIA has published anything that might be of help.
 
Carlton Brooks CCE, CEPC

 

Of note in Carlton's example recipe, the stabilizer blend is designed to form a gel, which is part of what gives body and whipability to a 6% milkfat base. Kappa carrageenan gels in any dairy product (from the calcium) and xanthan and locust bean gum gel when combined. 

 

After you age this mix, it will probably be like pudding; it may need to blended to convert to a fluid gel before pouring into a machine.

 

This particular blend seems like it would be ideal for a soft serve ice cream; I wouldn't recommend it for regular ice cream.

Notes from the underbelly

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 6/3/2016 at 7:16 AM, paulraphael said:

 

Of note in Carlton's example recipe, the stabilizer blend is designed to form a gel, which is part of what gives body and whipability to a 6% milkfat base. Kappa carrageenan gels in any dairy product (from the calcium) and xanthan and locust bean gum gel when combined. 

 

After you age this mix, it will probably be like pudding; it may need to blended to convert to a fluid gel before pouring into a machine.

 

This particular blend seems like it would be ideal for a soft serve ice cream; I wouldn't recommend it for regular ice cream.

 

Thank you for your help!  My soft serve machine is getting installed this weekend so hopefully I'll be able to figure things out asap.  

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I wonder if someone can provide a short intro on how a soft serve machine works.  I've recently been fascinated by no-specialized-machine ice-cream methods.  Generally, in it's simplest form, this means dumping a pint of cream in a mixer, along with a can of sweetened condensed milk and having at it with the whisk attachment.  And freezing the result.

 

Recently, I found that using Eagle Brand Chocolate SCM produced chocolate soft serve - worthy of your most basic fake Chinese buffet resto - right out of the mixer.  It just wasn't cold enough.

 

So then I look at the ChefSteps vid.  They're not using SCM, but they are using milk, sugar and milk powder (yeah, plus flavorings like vanilla),  Then they use dry ice to cool it.

 

Seems like the same thing.

 

The statement that a custard based mix will be turned into butter makes me think that there's a whole lot more going on in that soft serve machine than I would've thought.

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  • 1 year later...
On 5/21/2014 at 3:57 AM, carltonb said:

Digging through my books on the many ice cream classes I have taken here is a bases to start with.

 

A formula that is slightly higher in fat (Rich) soft serve formula might look like:
 
6% milkfat
13% nonfat milk solids
13% sugar 
0.5% stabilizers and emulsifiers
 
So that the mix has about 32.5% total solids.
 
This might translate into 
 
91g heavy cream, homogenized (35% fat)
702g whole milk, homogenized (4% fat)
65.6g nonfat skim milk powder
111g sugar
0.5g xanthan gum
0.5g locust bean gum
0.1g kappa carrageenan
8g egg yolk
infused flavors as desired.
 
This must be played around with until the desired product is reached,
 
You might want to also check to see if Migoya of the CIA has published anything that might be of help.
 
Carlton Brooks CCE, CEPC

 

Would anyone be able to share the formula for vegan soft serve mix (non-coconut)?

The ones sold in powdered form just don't do justice.

Edited by Twenley
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I use a vanilla mix (non-dairy) from Precision Foods.  I will use some kind of nut milk with it instead of water (these days I have been using unsweetened cashew milk) and flavoring.  I am not making soft serve but I am churning and freezing it like normal ice cream, but it would be soft serve if eaten immediately after churning or, I'm assuming, made in a soft serve machine. I also found if you want to keep it scoopable when frozen, adding vegetable glycerin does the trick.

 

My recipe is:

 

200 grams of mix

16 oz (liquid measure) of unsweetened nut milk (or soy or coconut)

1 tbs vegetable glycerin 

approx 1/4 cup of flavoring if liquid or 4-5 tbs of powder like peanut butter powder or cacao.

 

Here's a recent batch of peanut butter banana with hand chopped dark chocolate.  4 tbs powdered peanut butter and 1/4 cup Torani banana flavor. 

 

pb-ban-chips.jpg.c0ad8f49938cd494aebc19ca13b59895.jpg

Edited by mgaretz
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