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Shel_B

Julienne Peelers

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I'm considering a julienne peeler, and the Kuhn Rikon seems to have lots of good reviews and comments. Anyone here have any thoughts about this gadget, or another julienne peeler that may be better?


 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

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I've used several brands and models since they came out. In my opinion, it's not the brand that matters as much as the type. Although I prefer swivel blades for regular peelers, they're a disadvantage in julienne peelers. So go with a fixed blade version. Also, I prefer a Y-shape handle over the straight version.

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Janet A. Zimmerman, aka "JAZ"
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Author, The Healthy Pressure Cooker Cookbook and All About Cooking for Two

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Yup. I have a cheap Y-peeler which works great.

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Hi,

I try to eat healthy food: different salads, vegetable dishes, etc. I am very interested in some simple recipes and I have decided to buy a peeler.

On Amazon, I found two variants:
www.amazon.com/dp/B00LKRZ9Y4/ref=nosim/?tag=egulletsociety-20
www.amazon.com/dp/B0000CEWJD/ref=nosim/?tag=egulletsociety-20

As for a girl, I have too big hands, lol, and I'm a little worried that peeler will slide and I can get hurt. This has happened many times with my kitchen knife. I really like this peeler because of rubberised handle:
www.amazon.com/dp/B00LKRZ9Y4/ref=nosim/?tag=egulletsociety-20

The only thing that confuses me - a small number of reviews.

Anybody tried to use one of them? Or please post the one you use that works great.

Janet

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A couple of years ago, Cook's Illustrated tested vegetable peelers. They preferred this inexpensive Kuhn Rikon for a Y-shaped peeler and this Messermeister for a straight peeler. I use the latter and like it very much. Before that, I used an OXO straight peeler, which I also liked. The handle is a little larger than the Messermeister, so it might fit your hand better.


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I've gone through several of these cutters - used to depend on the Kuhn Rikon but  several months ago got this  Uber Chef  model  which works a tad better

 

I was never satisfied with the other brands.

 

I wear a cut-resistant glove on my left hand - which for someone with arthritis, like me, or just a bit clumsy (and I have big hands - wear a size 9 regular glove) is ESSENTIAL with such tools. 

You can still cut yourself if you really try, but for the  ordinary slip and turn - for me when distracted, it is great protection - I always use it while using a mandolin or box grater or similar cutter.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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Hi Janet, welcome to the Forums.

 

A question for you: what do you want to do with this tool?  Your links are to gadgets that do different things--julienne, a general peeler, or both.  Those are very different uses. A julienne is usually for a garnish, while the peeler is more versatile--removing the external skin, cutting fine ribbons, etc.  I use my peelers all the time, my julienne tool rarely.  Depending on what you want to cook, you may not need the julienne tool at all, at least not now.  I personally like the straight peelers.

 

The Cuisinart disk that rotuts mentions is a godsend if you do a lot of shredding. I use mine for veggies, fruit, cheese, chocolate.  Easier, faster, and safer than using a box grater.

 



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The julienne cutter is not just for garnish.  More and more people are using them to make zucchini, carrot, jicama and etc., "slaw"  julienne sweet potatoes for deep frying or for making something similar to latkes.  I use it on celery root, parsnips, daikon radish.

 

If I am doing more than one or two items, I have the rotary cutter which makes finer "strings" as well as the same size as the julienne cutter.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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Andie, yes, you're right.  What I should have said was that I personally find the small, hand-held julienne tools inefficient for generating much volume, so I use mine primarily for garnishes. If I I want a bowl full of julienned anything, I use my Cuisinart or would look for the kind of rotary cutter you describe. It all depends on what you want to accomplish, hence my question to the OP.



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Funny you posted this ..I wanted too yesterday!!

 

Interested ..too in this post

 

I have one on my flat, but don't use it much.  Was thinking hand-held here!!

 

Had looked at this one:

http://www.amazon.co...julienne peeler

 

Paul


Its good to have Morels

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I like the Kuhn Ricon straight peelers best.  I can't stand the Y peelers - my hands don't work that way. Early on I used a straight peeler (my dad still has it - and it's aged into a very nice shape).  I also learned to use a paring knife like Grandma, and I most often use this to peel things.  I think if you get skilled with a paring knife nothing else works as well.  I have a Messermeister Julienne Peeler but it's not really up to julienning lots of veges, more of for a quick little garnish (the reviews bear this out).  But for julienne - a V-slicer!  Best mandoline out there.  Unfortunately they are not extremely durable, but they cut the best (till they wear out) and are cheap and easy to clean.  I have 3!  Others just don't cut as well, are hard to clean (and therefor I don't use them), or are really expensive. I bought the 'pro' version and it's not any more durable - the part that wears out - the blade - is exactly the same, so just get the basic model.  But that V shape really cuts efficiently. note:  I looked up V-slicer and it seems that the patent is over or released and there are several companies making them now - or at least they are under several brands - so who knows which is best.  

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Nevertheless, I decided to try peeler from Deiss. I will describe my impressions and peeler's pros and cons after Amazon deliver it. Thank you all for your advice.

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I have a full set of Cuisinart discs and haven't used them more than one or twice in years.  Though I use the Cuisinart often.  Now I'm thinking about possible uses for the discs, particularly since I am just getting into Japanese cuisine.  Interestingly my Cuisinart is made in Japan, not France.

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Hi,

 

I decided to buy two peelers. And after a week of use, I can share my impressions. Please, do not judge strictly, this is my first review :)

I was initially interested in extraordinary round form of Joseph Joseph 3-in-1. But then it turned out that it does a great job, cleans easily and safely. It's a little easier to peel apples and other round fruits, compared to peeler with a standard handle. It also does a nice noodles. Joseph Joseph is conveniently disassembled for cleaning in the dishwasher. But still has shortcomings. This peeler is not very well suited for continuous operation. Because of its shape, insufficient size (too small and narrow) and slippery material hand begins to tire quickly enough. And then noodles turns out not so beautiful as before. As a result, we have a very interesting concept, but with some minor flaws.

As for the second peeler from Deiss, I have not noticed the large differences in the quality of peeling and julienning. It is easier to clean, you just need to hold the peeler under running water. Not be amiss to keep on hand a cheap brush to occasionally clean out the remnants of vegetables stuck between teeth. Traditional peeler's handle seemed to me still more convenient than peeler of round shape. Your hand is not so much tired and peeler does not slip in it. So you can get more job done.

Both peelers are great products, with own advantages and disadvantages, but in the last week, I noticed that mostly use peeler from Deiss. I really like it.

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