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SylviaLovegren

Eggnog Crisis in Toronto!

13 posts in this topic

Any Torontonians have a source for decent bought eggnog?

Coming from the NJ area in the States, I'm used to having dozens of choices of eggnogs in the markets...and even the lowest supermarket brand is usually fairly adequate.

So I didn't think anything about it when I picked up the President's Choice eggnog at the Freshco the other day, although I was surprised to see it was the only kind offered. But when the PC eggnog was poured it resembled thickened yellow water, which was pretty much what it tasted like and examining the ingredient list, sugar and water were the two top entries. Blech. That got dumped straight down the drain. Dreadful stuff.

The health food store had Soy Nog but when I asked about eggnog they said they couldn't get any this year. ??? The other health food store in our neighborhood does carry Harmony Farms eggnog, which is pretty good (not fabulous but pretty good) but it's $8 for about 2 cups full.

The Loblaws had another brand -- one only, as well, like Freshco -- but the ingredient list started with water and sugar and I'm not going that route again. NoFrills had a different President's Choice offering -- this one with spiced rum flavoring -- but it also listed water and sugar as the first two ingredients.

Is eggnog not a particularly popular thing in Toronto? Maybe it's just my neighborhood? Anyone have a source/brand of good eggnog?

The Harmony was pretty good, as I said, but at that price, I could make my own and end up with more than 2 cups worth of nog.

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I usually make my own or failing that add whipping cream, rum and nutmeg to the store stuff. But did you try the PC one in the bottles that's ultrapasturized and doesn't require refrigeration? It get's mixed reviews - but it's thick.

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I read a story once of a bachelor that was asked to bring eggnog to a party and he melted a good quality ice cream and added bourbon. If all else fails its a backup, add a little nutmeg and rum.

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Kerry, I haven't seen that PC offering -- I'll look to see if anyone in my neighborhood carries it.

Creola, sounds good to me!

I actually made non-cooked eggnog yesterday with some fresh farm eggs and it was pretty good. My only concern is that my husband and son don't like it with booze in it (they really are very nice people, otherwise) and the alcohol apparently does help kill any egg borne bacteria. On Sunday I made some cooked eggnog, but we didn't like the flavor nearly as much.

I wonder if the paucity of eggnog here is a result of the English heritage? In the old eggnog recipe thread there's a comment from someone who took homemade eggnog to a party in England and none of the English knew what it was. I bet Dickens would have known!

Wonder if the west and maritime parts of Canada are also low in eggnog?

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If reports from my family are any indication, there's all sorts of Eggnog going on in Alberta. Then again, we were always able to buy small-batch artisanal nogs there, so perhaps we were blessed.

Here in Ecuador I have to make do with Rompope, which is close but no cigar. Falta spices.


Elizabeth Campbell, baking 10,000 feet up at 1° South latitude.

My eG Food Blog (2011)My eG Foodblog (2012)

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If you're interested, I have a cooked eggnog recipe that's generally well received. Otherwise, as I live in San Francisco, I'm afraid I can't be much help.

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If you're interested, I have a cooked eggnog recipe that's generally well received. Otherwise, as I live in San Francisco, I'm afraid I can't be much help.

Would love to see it! Thanks!

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I think Kawartha and Harmony both make eggnog - at least they have in the past.

Might be better than the Neilsen/ Sealtest/ store-brand stuff.

Cheers,

Geoff

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On the topic of uncooked eggnogs, do you have access to pastuerized eggs (NOT "egg beaters" or other egg white products)? They're more expensive, but a good option if you're concerned about illness (which I would be).


Joanna G. Hurley

"Civilization means food and literature all round." -Aldous Huxley

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If you're interested, I have a cooked eggnog recipe that's generally well received. Otherwise, as I live in San Francisco, I'm afraid I can't be much help.

Would love to see it! Thanks!

I came up with this years ago because all the commercial brands are too sweet and fake tasting for me. Basically, it’s a thin crème anglaise (stirred custard). The lightly-whipped cream finish is what makes it work.

eggs, 4 lg

sugar, 3/4 c (divided)

nutmeg, 1-1/2 tsp (divided)

salt, 1/4 tsp

milk, 5 c (divided)

vanilla extract, 1 tsp

bourbon, 2 tbsp (or dark rum, southern comfort, amaretto, etc.)

heavy cream, 1 c (divided)

Beat eggs; blend in sugar (reserving 2 tbsp for Step 3), salt, 1 tsp nutmeg and 2 c milk. Measure out another 1 c milk.

Cook egg mixture over a heat diffuser or double boiler, stirring constantly, until lightly thickened, 170 to 175 degrees. Remove from heat and stir in third cup of milk. Pour into a two-quart bottle. Add vanilla, liquor, 1/2 c cream and remaining 2 c milk. Chill overnight, stirring occasionally for the first few hours.

When ready to serve, whip remaining 1/2 c heavy cream with remaining 2 tbsp sugar until thick and frothy but not stiff; stir into eggnog. Sprinkle servings with a dash of nutmeg. Makes about 1‑3/4 qt.

Spiked Eggnog: Chill a bottle of bourbon, rum or other spirit and pass separately. Each person may then add as much (or little) as he or she desires, a pony shot (2 tbsp) being typical.

Extra Rich: For an even richer eggnog, increase eggs to six. Reduce milk to 4 c and increase cream to 1-1/2 c. (I reserve this version for Christmas eve.)

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If you're interested, I have a cooked eggnog recipe that's generally well received. Otherwise, as I live in San Francisco, I'm afraid I can't be much help.

Would love to see it! Thanks!

I came up with this years ago because all the commercial brands are too sweet and fake tasting for me. Basically, it’s a thin crème anglaise (stirred custard). The lightly-whipped cream finish is what makes it work.

eggs, 4 lg

sugar, 3/4 c (divided)

nutmeg, 1-1/2 tsp (divided)

salt, 1/4 tsp

milk, 5 c (divided)

vanilla extract, 1 tsp

bourbon, 2 tbsp (or dark rum, southern comfort, amaretto, etc.)

heavy cream, 1 c (divided)

Beat eggs; blend in sugar (reserving 2 tbsp for Step 3), salt, 1 tsp nutmeg and 2 c milk. Measure out another 1 c milk.

Cook egg mixture over a heat diffuser or double boiler, stirring constantly, until lightly thickened, 170 to 175 degrees. Remove from heat and stir in third cup of milk. Pour into a two-quart bottle. Add vanilla, liquor, 1/2 c cream and remaining 2 c milk. Chill overnight, stirring occasionally for the first few hours.

When ready to serve, whip remaining 1/2 c heavy cream with remaining 2 tbsp sugar until thick and frothy but not stiff; stir into eggnog. Sprinkle servings with a dash of nutmeg. Makes about 1‑3/4 qt.

Spiked Eggnog: Chill a bottle of bourbon, rum or other spirit and pass separately. Each person may then add as much (or little) as he or she desires, a pony shot (2 tbsp) being typical.

Extra Rich: For an even richer eggnog, increase eggs to six. Reduce milk to 4 c and increase cream to 1-1/2 c. (I reserve this version for Christmas eve.)

Thanks! Will try it directly!

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