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Removing fine particulates


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I have a project where we are trying to spray a sauce through a glaze sprayer to convey a certain look. The sauce has particulate in it (fine spices, fine ground pepper etc) which is clogging the nozzle. The sauce flows through the pick up and check valves fine. What's the best method to remove these particulates? Chinois ? Chinois & cheese cloth? I don't really want to go to a superbag. Any thoughts?

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The cheapest and easiest way would be to use a coffee filter. The disadvantage is that these filters clog quickly - especially if your stock has a lot of gelatine in it.

Otherwise, try agar filtration as suggested above.

There is no love more sincere than the love of food - George Bernard Shaw
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I was concerned that the super bag might be too fine as I don't want a clear liquid, but I'll try a 400 & 250 poly filter bag from McMaster Carr.

Personally, I find the 100 µm superbags to be too coarse to get a clear liquid. Works fine to remove ground pepper, however.

Edited by pep. (log)
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I've filtered oils with infused spices using the small size jelly bags (2) tying them tightly and putting one on each side in a salad spinner which quickly expresses the oil through the bags and into the outer bowl.

Using coffee filters this takes quite a long time but only five minutes, at most, with this method.

I actually tie the bags together by the strings.

Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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However, I think it might be better to rework your procedure. Make an infusion with the spices, strain that, and add the liquid to your sauce base.

I think this would be the best approach. Is there any reason you can't use whole spices in your recipe, not ground?

PS: I am a guy.

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You could try a buchner funnel.

*thread hijack*

Along these lines, what are some other clarification techniques out there for controlling particulate matter?

I know of Dave Arnold's agar method, but what has your experience been with other techniques? charcoal? superbags?

I blog about science and cooking: www.sciencefare.org

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Update:

I ordered a 50 micron and 100 micron filter bag from McMaster Carr. The 100 was back ordered so I tried the 50 over the weekend. It took everything out leaving me with an almost colorless liquid which was great but it took a long tome and a lot of pressure to work all the solution through the bag. The 100 is up next and if that works a 100 super bag may be in my future.

Now the down side. The specific gravity of the filtered solution overwhelmed the spray nozzle of the pump up sprayer. It worked, but just barely. I don't want to go to a HVLP chocolate sprayer but I will if I have to. Anyone have any luck spraying low viscosity high specific gravity (lots of sugar in solution) glazes through a hand sprayer? If so which ones?

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