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rebgold

Vegan Crepes

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Has anyone had any success making a vegan, gluten free buckwheat crepe? Mine will not cooperate and I have tried multiple changes to the recipe, with and without corn starch, baking soda, more oil, soda water, etc... They turn out terrible, too thick when they're flippable, too many holes when the batter is thin.

Any ideas?

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You might try a fermented dough like in south Indian dosas. They are pretty crepe-like and are vegan. No buckwheat in the traditional recipes, though.


Edited by cdh (log)

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I might point out that dosa are nothing like a crepe...

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Have you tried any of the pre-blended AP gluten free flours? I believe Bob's Red Mill has one.

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I might point out that dosa are nothing like a crepe...

We must be using very different definitions for the phrase "nothing like", since dosa are pretty widely defined as "a crepe" by people who make and sell them. Sure, they're crispy and made of rice and lentils... but they're still a thin batter-based crepe.

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I might point out that dosa are nothing like a crepe...

We must be using very different definitions for the phrase "nothing like", since dosa are pretty widely defined as "a crepe" by people who make and sell them. Sure, they're crispy and made of rice and lentils... but they're still a thin batter-based crepe.

To me, a crispy crepe would be akin to a crunchy omelette. It doesn't make sense. A vegan crepe seems an an oxymoron. Crepes are mostly egg.

Still, I'm intrigued, because I have developed a good Belgian Waffle recipe that happens to be vegan compliant (but not gluten-free).

So, the problem solver in me is wondering what the standard vegan substitutes for eggs are.


Edited by IndyRob (log)

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Ahhh... I have made and quite enjoy crunchy omelets. Just fry some cheese in the pan before putting in the eggs... makes a very nice crispy crust.

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Sometimes trying to make something vegan and gluten-free at the same time is just asking for too much. I say this as someone who's done a fair bit of vegan cooking. If you are intent on making these both vegan and gluten free, you may need to accept that the final result is probably not going to be exactly how you want it to be. Maybe practice making ones that are either just vegan or just gluten-free first.

I do think it's possible to make a thin buckwheat pancake, though you may have better luck if you go for one with a bit thicker / spongier texture than a traditional crêpe. Also, I think many normal buckwheat crêpes have mostly wheat flour, rather than using only buckwheat flour (e.g., David Lebovitz's recipe). You can try adding some ener-g brand egg replacer (mostly potato starch and tapioca starch) to replace the egg, and using melted coconut oil or another fat in the batter, as well as for cooking in.

If it's for a savory application, you might also look into making socca, which should be vegan and gluten free just how they are, or maybe buckwheat blini.

If you're not trying to make them healthy, you can cheat and try to hide the flaws in the crêpe itself by using copious amounts of fatty and sweet (or umami for savory crêpes) components. Cook with some coconut oil or Earth Balance margarine and orange liqueur, cover with powdered sugar and fresh fruit, add vegan sour-cream and tomato, mushroom, and nutritional yeast heavy filling, etc.


Edited by Will (log)

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To me, a crispy crepe would be akin to a crunchy omelette. It doesn't make sense. A vegan crepe seems an an oxymoron. Crepes are mostly egg.

Still, I'm intrigued, because I have developed a good Belgian Waffle recipe that happens to be vegan compliant (but not gluten-free).

So, the problem solver in me is wondering what the standard vegan substitutes for eggs are.

I think it would be easier to make an eggless crêpe than one without butter, but I could be wrong; I never had proper crêpes before I stopped eating dairy, but the smell of butter taunts me whenever someone's making them.

I would love it if you could post your waffle recipe somewhere! I have had good luck with the King Arthur sourdough waffle recipe with some modifications, however without eggs, the outside gets soft too quickly.

As to egg substitutes, look here (but generally, one or more of starches, flax or chia seeds, banana, soy lecithin, depending on the application).

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I think it would be easier to make an eggless crêpe than one without butter, but I could be wrong; I never had proper crêpes before I stopped eating dairy, but the smell of butter taunts me whenever someone's making them.

Apparently, Jacques Pepin (according to him) and Julia Child had a disagreement about whether butter should go into crepe batter. He said it should, and she said it shouldn't. They had a cook-off and he had to admit hers were better.

I still put melted butter in mine. I like it (but it is a tablespoon or two, versus three eggs).

I would love it if you could post your waffle recipe somewhere! I have had good luck with the King Arthur sourdough waffle recipe with some modifications, however without eggs, the outside gets soft too quickly.

Look on the last page here. (Oh, wait, it has one egg, but I bet it has a shot at success without it).

The upshot is to start with a poolish or sourdough starter and add a good quantity of cornstarch (probably around 3TB, although I was probably measuring by weight) to provide crispiness.

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Apparently, Jacques Pepin (according to him) and Julia Child had a disagreement about whether butter should go into crepe batter. He said it should, and she said it shouldn't. They had a cook-off and he had to admit hers were better.

Butter is usually used to grease the pan though, no?

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I might point out that dosa are nothing like a crepe...

We must be using very different definitions for the phrase "nothing like", since dosa are pretty widely defined as "a crepe" by people who make and sell them. Sure, they're crispy and made of rice and lentils... but they're still a thin batter-based crepe.

Yes Indian menus often have "cute" ways of describing dishes, like saying that vadas are savoury donuts, that idlis are rice cakes (vaguely true but misleading when the Western use of rice cakes is so different), calling upma semolina risotto or semolina pulao. I find such inaccurate descriptions to be incredibly tiresome. Just because it is common, does not make it a good thing.

Dosa are made from completely different ingredients than crepes. They are fermented. The texture is different. The taste is different. Yes, it is true that they are both round flat things cooked on a flat pan. But if someone told me they really craved crepes and were sad that they couldn't eat them due to x reason, I would never ever recommend they try dosa as an alternative. I might however try to get them into dosa as a completely different eating experience that is, IMO, far superior. :raz:

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Butter is usually used to grease the pan though, no?

You are correct, sir. And was on Julia's.

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Ha! I was thinking that tofu (although I have never eaten any) seems to have similar texture to cooked egg. So if I were to try to tackle this, I would probably start with some sort of tofu slurry and add flour (forgot about the gluten-free part) and some liquid and seasonings.

Then I thought "Well, if I've thought of this, perhaps someone else has...." And searched for "Tofu Crepes". Bingo!

The pictures look quite good. Still not gluten free, but that should be a bridgeable divide.

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I've been waiting for a vegan friend to get back from a ski trip and she just sent me this link to

vegan, gluten-free crepes.

She says the trick is to cook them just till they are set and should barely turn color, otherwise they become tough.

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I've been waiting for a vegan friend to get back from a ski trip and she just sent me this link to

vegan, gluten-free crepes.

She says the trick is to cook them just till they are set and should barely turn color, otherwise they become tough.

I tried this one and didn't consider it successful texture wise. I've pretty much given up on the gluten free part for now, the vegan part was easy.

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It's been a long time since this post, I was so busy getting my menu done I had forgotten about it. I did finally come up with a successful vegan/gluten free crepe. I make it every day at the restaurant. It is a combination of Bobs Red Mill gf flour, quinoa flour, buckwheat flour, egg replacer and a little olive oil. It's not exactly delicious by itself, but it's not bad and it definitely works once it's filled and sauced.

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I was thinking that tofu (although I have never eaten any) seems to have similar texture to cooked egg.

No.

There are many different tofus, but I can't think of one which has the texture of cooked egg, whatever that means. Hard boiled or soft boiled. Runny scrambled or firm scrambled, sunny side up or done to death, etc. etc.

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