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Does anyone know anything about "astrance: a cooks book" ? I preordered months ago, then somehow it went out of stock on amazon, and now I got a letter from amazon saying a pre release item I ordered will not be available by christmas. Has this book been scrapped and its not coming out?

http://www.amazon.co...t/dp/2812306629

I ordered mine through Amazon US and received it here in Australia a few days ago. I'm still working my way through it but -- wow! It comes in a thick cardboard slip case with a precision cutout of the title. There are two books in the slipcase, one the cook's book and the second containing step-by-step pictorials of several of the preparations from the book. Will post a better review once I get my head around it.

Edited by nickrey (log)

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

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Every Grain of Rice is my favorite of 2012, as well. There will probably be more talk in the US about it in 2013, since that's when the US publication occurs. I'm already looking forward to Fuchsia's next cookbook, which she's working on and will be regional.

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