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DanM

Cookbooks 2012

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The Mugaritz and Sat Bains books. Keen to see if Hideo Dekura's Encyclopaedia of Japanese Cuisine turns out to be interesting. I think that maybe Peter Doyle's est book will hit this year. And, too, Passard's Art of Cooking With Vegetables. I already have the new Nobu vegetarian book.

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Mugaritz, Marque. In Kindle world, A Girl and her Pig by April Bloomfield. My cookbook collection is out of control and I try to by Kindle versions when possible (reading them on iPad).

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I second the Mugaritz, Marque and Sat Bains books, and add "Pastries" by Pierre Hermé, the third book by Francisco Migoya, "The Square Cookbook" by Phil Howard.

Teo

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I was looking @ The River Cottage Fish Book--just not sure I would get enough use of it!!

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I was looking @ The River Cottage Fish Book--just not sure I would get enough use of it!!

The River Cottage Fish Book has been out for a few years in the UK. I have a copy and find it very useful and informative.

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I know there are mixed feelings around here about their first charcuterie book, but I'll be curious to see Polcyn and Ruhlman's Salumi. I haven't gotten into dry curing yet, so it'll be mostly academic, but I'm hoping it'll be an interesting read.

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Another vote for Sat Bains' book, if it finally comes out this year!

The bad news is my ugly mug may feature somewhere in it (I was there the night they were taking some pics for the book) :unsure:

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I'm a big fan of Ruhlman and Polcyn's Charcuterie, so I'm definitely looking forward to Salumi. Anyone know if anything interesting related to Mexican cuisine is coming out this year?

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I'm a big fan of Ruhlman and Polcyn's Charcuterie, so I'm definitely looking forward to Salumi. Anyone know if anything interesting related to Mexican cuisine is coming out this year?

I know of a couple books related to Mexican cuisine coming out this year that I anticipate will be very worthwhile. The first is "La Cocina Mexican: Many Cultures, One Cuisine", by Marilyn Tausend & Ricardo Muñoz.

The second is 'Tacos, Tortas and Tamales: Flavors from the griddles, pots and street-side kitchens of México", Roberto Santibańez the author.

I have several previous cookbooks by all these authors and I'm sure their latest offerings will outstanding.

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I've been enjoying A Girl and Her Pig lately. The recipes are very accessible and most are suitable for mid-week meals. Basic fare--you could give this, probably, to a friend or relative who normally works from the likes of The Naked Chef and Cook with Jamie--but I've been happy with everything I've attempted so far. Making the 'seven vegetable soup' tonight.

Marque is unsurprisingly good but very complex. So far I've made a couple of semi-bastardised versions of his dishes. I think I'll need to wait until a weekend or the holidays before attempting some more.


Edited by ChrisTaylor (log)

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Every Grain of Rice by Fuchsia Dunlop (UK version; US version doesn't come out until 2013)

Burma: Recipes and Tales of Travel by Naomi Duguid

Bouchon Bakery (not as interested as I would have been 5 years ago, but will likely still buy it)

Street Foods of Mexico

Tacos, Tortas and Tamales

Frontera: Margaritas, Guacamoles and Snacks

Coming Home to Sicily

Jerusalem: A Cookbook by Yotam Ottolenghi

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Mugaritz and The Elements of Dessert are definitely on my list. I already preordered them on Amazon. Mugaritz because, well, it's the Mugaritz book. The Elements of Dessert because I really enjoyed (and still use) Frozen Desserts.

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I mentioned in the "Cookbooks, How Many" topic about this book:

"A couple of weeks ago I got and am now reading Cheese and Culture - A History of Cheese and Its Place in Western Civilization, by Paul S. Kindstedt.

I've read almost halfway through it and while some of it is heavy going, it is fascinating. Cheese was not merely food. It had religious significance in many cultures and had a distinct effect on the spread of civilization, allowing people who were lactose intolerant (yes, even back then) to derive nutrition from milk in its secondary form, cheese.

This is not a book for someone who wants a quick read but if you are interested in how and why cheese (generic) and the various regional cheeses were developed and contributed to trade and the enrichment of societies, this is an excellent book.

"Cheese and Culture tells the story of how cheese history intersects with some of the pivotal periods in human history and in many cases shaped the lives of cheesemakers and the diverse cheeses they developed."

The more I read, I have so far reached the middle of the 18th century, the more fascinating I found it. The amount of research that went into this must have been staggering. I've read a lot of books about the history of cheese but this delves into monastic records that details how cheese became so diverse and how trading between countries contributed to treaties and alliances that might otherwise not have happened.

As I said above, this is not light reading but it is extremely interesting for anyone who is interested in learning more details of how cheese got from the "Cradle of Civilization" to the present.

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I'm a firm believer that if you can't eat food appreciatively and understand its nuances then you will not be a good cook, no matter how closely you follow recipes. "Cook and adjust" is my dictum in the kitchen.

For this reason, I'm recommending not so much a cookbook as an eater's book. This gem was written by a food developer who has a life-long interest in taste, flavour, and balance.

The author is Barb Stuckey. The title is: Taste What You're Missing. The Passionate Eater's Guide to Why Good Food Tastes Good. It comes with recommendations by David Chang, Heston Blumenthal, and Ming Tsai to mention a few. Try it, you'll like it.

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Just got an email from Amazon, Mugaritz is delayed at least a week :(

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I have several books on my wish list which have not yet been released but I am especially looking forward to the release of "Baked Elements: Our Ten Favorite Ingredients" written by the authors of "Baked: New Frontiers In Baking" and "Baked Explorations: Classic American Desserts Reinvented".

It is rare that I purchase a book sight-unseen but the recipes of Matt Lewis, Renato Poliafito and Tina Rupp have been show-stoppers for me.

In 2015 Rose Levy Beranbaum is planning to release "The Baking Bible". This is another book I will buy sight-unseen. I am very looking forward to the release of this book.

I am also looking forward to "The Dahlia Bakery Cookbook: Sweetness in Seattle" by Tom Douglas and "Vintage Cakes" by Julie Richardson. These books, however, I will check-out in the library before I make a purchase.

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Modernist Cuisine at Home. I'm in.

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