Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

jnash85

"The PDT Cocktail Book"

Recommended Posts

Does anyone else have this? I am absolutely loving it. I made a modified version of the Eclipse cocktail with tequila, Campari, cherry heering, and lemon juice.

I am going to try some of the infusions used in a number of the cocktails. I only hope that the results are good with scaled down versions, since all the infusions require you to sacrifice a 750 ml bottle of spirits.


Edited by jnash85 (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ordered it on Amazon, but they are saying that it's now out of stock and won't be back in until the new year... Glad to hear you are enjoying it though. I've heard good things about it from people I trust on the beverage front.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The book is amazing. Jim, Don, and their entire staff really knew what they were doing when they came up with these recipes. One thing i enjoyed most about the book is that its one of the first to touch on bar layout and design. Then there are the recipes and illustrations that truly make it a value at the $12.50 i paid for my copy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Illustrations are a amazing!

We made rattlesnakes the other night and they were fantastic !!!

Now I just need to order some black cardamom to make the "Mariner".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can scale them down without much issue with the exception of the fat washing ones, specifically the Bentons. The fat is so strong that you have to watch it very carefully.

In terms of the others, you should have no issue with the scaling, just keep an eye on the time and taste every now and than and adjust the infusion time. I have done the Bethula with as little as 6 oz without any problems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can scale them down without much issue with the exception of the fat washing ones, specifically the Bentons. The fat is so strong that you have to watch it very carefully.

In terms of the others, you should have no issue with the scaling, just keep an eye on the time and taste every now and than and adjust the infusion time. I have done the Bethula with as little as 6 oz without any problems.

Any idea how long the fat washed bourbon will last?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fat will start giving off flavors probably after 3 weeks. We typically didn't have the bottles around longer than a few days at the bar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any other cocktails you guys have tried from the book you'd like to point out?

I've been slowly pouring over it, picking out some goodies I can make at home or at work, and whipping up some special ingredients for others.

Went to Book Club night at the Whistler in Chicago where Mr. McGee was mixing PDT cocktails. All were delicious! White Birch Fizz (subbing Wormwood bitts for Suze) and the Girl From Jerez.

Among the many I've tried at home: the Cranberry Cobbler was nice. Picked up some fresh cranberries from my expensive local hippie co-op. Can't say the syrup turned out especially flavorful. I'd like to retry it by actually juicing the berries fresh and adding sugar. Major adjustments for swt/sour to be taken into account, of course.

The Lion's Tooth: Dandelion Root-infused Rittenhouse, Palo Cortado Sherry, Yellow Chartreuse, St. Germain. This one was freaking stellar! So delicious, even though I had to sub for the Palo Cortado. Would love to try it without the infusion to see if it makes just as fine a drink, but the Dandelion Root is delicious for sure.

I'll keep posting more as I think of them.

Your turn...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My husband and I have gone through periods of making the same PDT cocktail over and over for a few weeks at a time.

Some favorites:

Benton's Old Fashioned

Mezcal Mule

Shiso Delicious

Staggerac

Vieux Mot

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Left Hand

Perfect Pear

Rattlesnake

Paddington

Falling Leaves

These have been repeated many times already.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Lion's Tooth: Dandelion Root-infused Rittenhouse, Palo Cortado Sherry, Yellow Chartreuse, St. Germain. This one was freaking stellar! So delicious, even though I had to sub for the Palo Cortado. Would love to try it without the infusion to see if it makes just as fine a drink, but the Dandelion Root is delicious for sure.

If you have them, I recommend this drink without the infused rye and adding my Dandelion & Burdock Bitters. Really enjoyed this...


Edited by evo-lution (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

same PDT cocktail over and over for a few weeks at a time.

Staggerac

Envious.

All thanks to my husband who found a bottle of Stagg in a random liquor store in suburban Wisconsin, and carefully got it back home without the TSA confiscating it from his checked luggage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just received a copy as a Christmas present, away from my home bar, but cannot wait to try some of these recipes when I get back (and go to PDT when I come home to NYC this summer - that and Ssam).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm enjoying a Little Bit Country tonight. Bourbon, lemon juice, maple syrup, maraschino, jalapeno, and bitters. The maple syrup / jalapeno combo is great. I'm halfway though and its leaving me with a very nice burn...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A Water Lily. Gin, violette, Cointreau, and lemon juice. The books calls for equal parts of each ingredient; I used double the amount of gin in error. It was very good and reminded me of the Aviation with the gin/lemon/violette combo. I used Bombay Sapphire but I imagine that a more floral gin like Henrick's would work well too.

6755770675_c631566575_z.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

same PDT cocktail over and over for a few weeks at a time.

Staggerac

Envious.

All thanks to my husband who found a bottle of Stagg in a random liquor store in suburban Wisconsin, and carefully got it back home without the TSA confiscating it from his checked luggage.

The Staggerac is truly monumental. Haven't had one in a while: thanks for the reminder; it's now on the top of my to-do list.

I'm thinking I might have to pony up for this book too...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here are a few other cocktails from the PDT Cocktail Book that I made in the past couple of weeks.

Left Hand cocktail: bourbon, sweet vermouth, Campari, mole bitters. An excellent Manhattan variation.

6756328049_54e303f159_z.jpg

Talbott Leaf. That one had an intriguing ingredient list: bourbon, lemon, Chartreuse, Cynar, mint, strawberry preserves (!). It was actually delicious. There is only a touch of the preserves so you can't really tell that they are there. But they blend nicely with the other ingredients, especially the mint and Chartreuse.

6756321859_673cac674b_z.jpg

Harvest Moon: rye, Lillet, Chartreuse, apple brandy, bitters. It was very good and smooth. I am not a big fan of the apple brandy, but there was only enough to add some interesting background notes without dominating the drink.

6756340327_f42255e5b2_z.jpg

Applejack Rabbit: bonded apple brandy, orange & lemon juices, maple syrup. Very nicely balanced and the apple brandy paired well with the maple syrup. I liked it (despite the apple brandy!).

6756331341_a2294f249f_z.jpg

Hanky Panky (based on Harry Craddock): Tanqueray, Carpano Antica, Fernet I was not completely sold on that one. Despite loving all things bitter (Campari, Cynar, etc), I have a hard time with the intense herbal notes in Fernet. I much prefer a classic Negroni.

6756303989_ecfb1ec820_z.jpg

The last one I did not care for at all. South Slope : gin, Aperol, Lillet blanc, curacao, lemon. The combination of Lillet and Aperol which works in the Unusual Negroni, for example, didn't work here for me at all. It was very sweet and strange, almost like a bad piece of candy. And the color didn't help for sure!

6756298973_3af060a269_z.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also made a classic Bijou using the exact recommendations from PDT: Tanqueray, Dolin rouge, Chartreuse, orange bitters. I really enjoyed it. I had tried the Bijou before with a different gin/sweet vermouth combo (same ratios) and thought that it was too heavy on the Charteuse. With these ingredients, this cocktail really came to life for me.

6756317583_e3dd64a81f_z.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok I'm getting this book. This looks like it will really refresh my stagnant cocktail regimen (Old Fashioned/Improved cocktail, rinse, repeat...).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok I'm getting this book. This looks like it will really refresh my stagnant cocktail regimen (Old Fashioned/Improved cocktail, rinse, repeat...).

It's a nice book; I don't think that you will regret your purchase. Some recipes use esoteric ingredients but there are a lot of cocktails that are accessible too.

This is what I made last night: May Daisy cocktail with Cognac, Chartreuse, lemon, and simple. I was almost tempted to grate some nutmeg on top. It tasted like a very fancy punch. There is a good amount of Chartreuse in it, but it was really toned down by the Cognac. I am not sure if that is a good thing or not (I love Chartreuse so I would rather taste it!).

Anyway, it was a very enjoyable cocktail.

6758132333_91c23a2e43_z.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok I'm getting this book. This looks like it will really refresh my stagnant cocktail regimen (Old Fashioned/Improved cocktail, rinse, repeat...).

It's a nice book; I don't think that you will regret your purchase. Some recipes use esoteric ingredients but there are a lot of cocktails that are accessible too.

I like esoteric ingredients, but what I'm not as keen on is having to make a syrup or an infusion that only works for a very limited number of drinks. I assumed there would be a prohibitive number of those going on in this book, but from what you've posted it seems like there are plenty of drinks I could peruse the cabinet and citrus holdings and make right away. I'll make the occasional infusion (I love the Riviera) or a small batch of syrup I won't use for much else, but I generally like drinks I don't have to start days or hours ahead. Thanks for showing me that this books got more solid straightforward drinks than I thought. I'm not sure why I thought it wouldn't, but I've never been to PDT so I surely have a skewed view of what the place has to offer.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like esoteric ingredients, but what I'm not as keen on is having to make a syrup or an infusion that only works for a very limited number of drinks. I assumed there would be a prohibitive number of those going on in this book, but from what you've posted it seems like there are plenty of drinks I could peruse the cabinet and citrus holdings and make right away. I'll make the occasional infusion (I love the Riviera) or a small batch of syrup I won't use for much else, but I generally like drinks I don't have to start days or hours ahead. Thanks for showing me that this books got more solid straightforward drinks than I thought. I'm not sure why I thought it wouldn't, but I've never been to PDT so I surely have a skewed view of what the place has to offer.

+1 on this. I have the same problem with so many current cocktail recipes, and had the same reservations about this book. Of course, I need another cocktail book like I need a hole in the head - I'm never going to drink my way through the ones I already own - but if I feel the urge, this is one I'll very likely pick up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

photo 1.JPG

Pink Lady (Hendrick's gin, Laird's apple brandy, lemon, simple, grenadine + egg white).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By smeems
      Hi.  I'm brand new to this site.  I used to be on Chowhound but I see now that that site is a mess. I found this site and it looks pretty cool.  The main reason I joined is  I’m looking for recommendations for a restaurant to hold my wedding in March 2018. We were hoping maybe in Brooklyn but we are open to anything interesting. There will be 55-60 people and the ceremony will also be at the restaurant. I’m thinking of a brunch/early afternoon affair, most likely on a weekend. Would love to find a funky/old school/unique/charming type of place for my sweetheart. Inexpensive please! Thank you in advance!
    • By Kitchenista
      At this time of year when you can hoard fresh, local strawberries because they are so abundant, why not freeze them and enjoy them all year long. Then you won't have to buy tasteless, fake looking ones in the dead of winter!

      The best way to preserve them, sugar-free, and have them fresh, year-round is to freeze them. Remember to start with the freshest strawberries possible. Strawberries start to lose freshness and nutrients quickly and will only last a few days in the fridge, so the sooner you freeze them the better. Follow these steps and they will last up to a year in the freezer:
      1. Gently wash them and pat them dry or allow them to air dry for an hour or so. Slice off the tops, including the stem and any white area, then cut them in half lengthwise.
      2. Line one or more rimmed baking sheets (depending on how many berries you have) with parchment or SilPats. Arrange them in a single layer on the sheets. and place them, uncovered, or loosely covered with plastic wrap in the freezer. Allow them to freeze solid, about 12 hours. Once frozen, transfer the berries (they may stick to the parchment a bit, but peel off relatively easy) to a freezer weight plastic zipper bag. Press out as much of the air from the bag as possible before sealing, to minimize freezer burn over time. If you are planning to leave them in the freezer for months, then consider double bagging them. Place the bagged berries in the freezer, where they will keep for up to one year.
      Note: I will warn you that the thawed berries will not be firm and bright like they were when raw and fresh. They tend to thaw out a bit mushier, and slightly darker…but can still be used for anything you would use fresh strawberries for. For smoothies, use frozen.
      Optional: Brushing the berries with a bit of lemon juice before you freeze them will help to preserve their color. While strawberries can be frozen whole, cut or crushed, they will retain a higher level of their vitamin C content if left whole.
    • By boilsover
      My Breville BSO 800XL  just died on it's second birthday, after only *extremely* light use at my beach house.  Just won't power up.
       
      Reading online, I learned that a common failure mode is the thermal fuse blowing -WHICH IS DESIGNED TO BLOW AT <450F.  This is a $3 part at Radio Shack, and there is a detailed instruction on how to replace it here:  http://virantha.com/2014/03/02/fix-your-breville-smart-oven-by-replacing-the-thermal-fuse/
       
      So I guess I'll give fixing it myself a try and report back.  Has anyone here done this repair?  Was it successful?  And why would Breville use a fuse that is lower than the appliance's top heat settings?
       
      Thanks!
    • By Franzisaurus_Rex
      I've had an idea flowing across my brain waves over the last few months. It's on every channel and I'm getting ready to pull the trigger. 
      I'd like to try to braise a dish in my smoker. I am thinking of braising a rabbit, but the I'm not looking for guidance on the protein/ingredients, rather the technique. I turn to you, o internet, in hope you will tell me your secrets.
      Has anyone ever braised in their smoker before? I've done some research, but I haven't seen much on the "how to" for the technique. Here's my plan:
      - Brown the rabbits on skillet (stovetop)
      - Get the aromatics/other stuffz sweated browned, etc.
      - (MEANWHILE) Smoker heats up to 300-325 degrees.
      - Add stock to rabbit, bring to a simmer on the stove top.
      - Transfer to smoker, braise uncovered for 1-2 hours, then cover with foil to finish for as long as necessary.
      I've seen folks smoke and then braise, but I haven't seen much on the idea of braising something IN the smoker. I saw something on CookingwithMe.at about doing something similar with pork belly, but that's about it.
      All I know is that after using stock+drippings from a smoked turkey created this CRAZY MIND-BLOWING flavor, so I'm basing this a lot off that idea.
      -Franz
    • By boilsover
      The 2017 iteration of the International Home & Housewares Show is being held March 18-21 at McCormick Place in Chicago.  This is the world's 2nd-largest tradeshow for the cookware and housewares industry, close behind Ambiente in Frankfurt.  It is a cornucopia of what's new and what's coming down the pike in the world of cookware, and if you've ever wondered about why makers do the things they do, this is your opportunity to talk with execs and their product development people (e.g., you can discuss ceramics with the 6th-gen owner of Emile Henry).  It takes an able cookware geek a full two days to cover all the booths.
       
      Are any eGulls or eGuys besides me attending? 
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×