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Tostadas


Darienne
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"Is what is sold as "masa" up there prepared dough (that's what we would call "masa") or dry meal?

The standard brand around here for dry meal is the Maseca brand, although generics and store brands have made some inroads in the past few years. I'm not sure I've ever seen prepared dough in a store. "

It's dry meal, Maseca brand. Ingredients: selected corn treated with lime. Milled in Irving TX. That's it. Hmmm...how does that get to be a mix?

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

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"Is what is sold as "masa" up there prepared dough (that's what we would call "masa") or dry meal?

The standard brand around here for dry meal is the Maseca brand, although generics and store brands have made some inroads in the past few years. I'm not sure I've ever seen prepared dough in a store. "

It's dry meal, Maseca brand. Ingredients: selected corn treated with lime. Milled in Irving TX. That's it. Hmmm...how does that get to be a mix?

Hmmm. Don't know that I'd call it a mix, but the Maseca is the real deal. Same stuff I have in my cupboard, and with which I made tortillas last weekend. There should be instructions on the back with the ratio of water to dry masa. That's really all corn tortillas are, water, dry corn meal treated with lime, and salt. Unless they're really bad gringo ones, and then there's a whole bunch of preservatives and dough conditioners.

Basically what you're doing with this when you make the tortilla dough is hydrating the corn meal. If you can't find the ratios on your package, PM me and I'll pull my bag off the shelf, and send them to you. Excellent tutorial on the process here EG Tortillas.

--Roberta--

"Let's slip out of these wet clothes, and into a dry Martini" - Robert Benchley

Pierogi's eG Foodblog

My *outside* blog, "A Pound Of Yeast"

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"Is what is sold as "masa" up there prepared dough (that's what we would call "masa") or dry meal?

The standard brand around here for dry meal is the Maseca brand, although generics and store brands have made some inroads in the past few years. I'm not sure I've ever seen prepared dough in a store. "

It's dry meal, Maseca brand. Ingredients: selected corn treated with lime. Milled in Irving TX. That's it. Hmmm...how does that get to be a mix?

I guess you got the right thing after all. As Pierogi said, there should be instructions on the package.

As for "mix," (and "masa," which is Spanish for "dough") I'm going to guess they call it that because simply calling it "cornmeal" would invite confusion with regular non-nixtamalized cornmeal as used in USA and I suppose Canada.

This is my skillet. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My skillet is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it, as I must master my life. Without me my skillet is useless. Without my skillet, I am useless. I must season my skillet well. I will. Before God I swear this creed. My skillet and myself are the makers of my meal. We are the masters of our kitchen. So be it, until there are no ingredients, but dinner. Amen.

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Thanks you two. Yes, there are instructions on the bag and in English, French and Spanish.

Looked up the home website. Lots of different things available. Still no idea of why the Canadian import says 'Instant' on it.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

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Looked up the home website. Lots of different things available. Still no idea of why the Canadian import says 'Instant' on it.

Perhaps because you have to add water and - presto - masa? It's pretty easy to use. This is a great opportunity to play with your food and not get in trouble :biggrin: It'll take you a little practice to get a feel for the dough and working with it, but just have fun with it and see what works for you. Maseca is cheap enough (at least here in the States it it) that if you have some failures you can just start over.

Go for it

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We've lived several places where we could not get corn tortillas (which we very much prefer over flour) at all, except for in cans. And they were just awful. So I had my relatives send me that dry masa mix. I had a tortilla press, but you don't really need it. You can get pretty proficient with a rolling pin. In a household with a native Texan that expected to have corn tortillas all the time, as a staple, I made them constantly.

Easy to do, and the tortillas were pretty darn tasty.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Perhaps because you have to add water and - presto - masa? It's pretty easy to use. This is a great opportunity to play with your food and not get in trouble :biggrin: It'll take you a little practice to get a feel for the dough and working with it, but just have fun with it and see what works for you. Maseca is cheap enough (at least here in the States it it) that if you have some failures you can just start over.

Go for it

Cost: 2 kilos at $8 = 4.4 pounds at approx $1.81 per pound. What do you pay for it? Or do I really want to know?

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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We've lived several places where we could not get corn tortillas (which we very much prefer over flour) at all, except for in cans. And they were just awful. So I had my relatives send me that dry masa mix. I had a tortilla press, but you don't really need it. You can get pretty proficient with a rolling pin. In a household with a native Texan that expected to have corn tortillas all the time, as a staple, I made them constantly.

Easy to do, and the tortillas were pretty darn tasty.

Well, I gave away my tortilla press some years ago...non-use...but found my comal only a week or two ago. It was my Mother's and I thought I had disposed of it too.

I'll look in the second hand stores for another press for fun.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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Cost: 2 kilos at $8 = 4.4 pounds at approx $1.81 per pound. What do you pay for it? Or do I really want to know?

Darienne, you may not want to know. I picked up a bag (same brand and size) for $2.38 at my local HEB grocery store today.

What can I say? You have made an old woman happy today. :raz: And you can't come to my next birthday party, either.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

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8.39 MXP for a 1 kg bag. Comes out to a bit under 70 US cents per kilo (retail).

I should export the stuff.

This is my skillet. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My skillet is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it, as I must master my life. Without me my skillet is useless. Without my skillet, I am useless. I must season my skillet well. I will. Before God I swear this creed. My skillet and myself are the makers of my meal. We are the masters of our kitchen. So be it, until there are no ingredients, but dinner. Amen.

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What can I say? You have made an old woman happy today. :raz: And you can't come to my next birthday party, either.

Dang! And I already had your gift wrapped. LOL Slightly off topic: I like to use the masa as a thickener for my chili. The aroma reminds me of the chili I used to get at Steak & Shake when I was growing up in St. Louis.

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I like to use the masa as a thickener for my chili.

Yes, I do that as well. I actually know quite a few folks that do. I kinda think it's a pretty typical "Texas thang."

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Getting back to the original subject, I came across this while searching for something else. Sweet tostadas.

This describes the crisp bowls made with corn tortillas, but one can work equally well constructed as one would a "stacked" crisp taco or tostada.

I usually fry my own, rather than buying the commercial version, but the commercial ones are perfectly fine for making various combos.

Such as those suggested here.

And there there is the more elegant construction described here!

A local Mexican/Guatemalan restaurant prepares a lovely breakfast with a stack of tostadas, the first layer is scrambled eggs with chorizo and green chiles on a crisp tostada, then another tostada with sliced tomatoes and guacamole topped with salsa and sour cream. Very pretty as well as delicious. One can have beans if desired.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Hi Andie,

And thanks so much.

I have learned something from all your answers that I did not know. Remember...this is the northland.

Tostadas are NOT a thing, like corn chips. They are tortillas to begin with, not just a snack food. But then you'll tell me that chicharones are not necessarily chicharones as I have known then. All I ever knew of tostadas was this cellophane wrapped package of crispy discs. Who knew? Never eaten one while in the SW.

My go-to dish was always a Chile Relleno because you can't get them here, not even in a restaurant. So there.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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  • 1 month later...

Getting in late on this but...tostadas are one of my favorite dishes. I use a meat topping called TINGA. It is shredded pork, lightly fried and then cooked in a tomato sauce with a bay leaf, oregano, garlic, pork broth and chipotle chile powder. Found the recipe in Cooks magazine this spring and have since found variations in a few Mexican cookbooks.

Basically, I cook a pork roast, (shoulder is suggested but I use a leaner cut), in the crockpot overnight with a couple of chunked onions and two garlic cloves. Throw in some dried thyme, about a teaspoon or so. After cooking for 8 hours or so, pull the pork out of the crock, let it cool some and then shred it. Save the broth. Put the pork in a hot skillet with some vegetable oil. Fry until the ends are slightly crispy. Stir in a 14 ounce can of tomato puree, a bay leaf, 1 TBSP to start of chipotle chile powder, two cloves chopped garlic and 1 cup of pork broth. Simmer until hot and slightly thickened, about 10-15 minutes.

Heat tostadas in the oven at 250 to 300 degrees for a few minutes. Top hot tostadas with refried beans, tinga, shredded lettuce, shredded cheese, sliced jalapenos, sour cream, chopped onion, salsa and whatever else sounds good. We use small spreaders for the beans and sour cream. The tinga is not piled on, rather it is generously dotted on top of the tostada. If you top them too generously you will not be able to pick them up to eat them. We just slide our hand under them and pick them up.

I know that at least three of our local Mexican restaurants serve these. They might be listed on the menu under chalupas.

Tostada shells are also what Taco Bell uses to make Mexican Pizzas. Heat tostada shells. Top one with refried beans and taco-seasoned ground beef. Top with another tostada shell, enchilada sauce and shredded cheese. Heat in oven til cheese melts. Sprinkle with chopped tomato.

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Oh my, that sounds so good. Never heard of Tinga before. I could make them into a sort of enchilada format for ease of eating, couldn't I? Not traditional, but I find eating large crispy loaded things a bit difficult.

Could put the mixture onto strong chips like a plate of nachos???

Edited by Darienne (log)

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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You can actually make stacked enchiladas which work nicely with the crisp tostadas.

They will soften with the moisture in the other ingredients but will still retain a bit of crunch around the edges.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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You can actually make stacked enchiladas which work nicely with the crisp tostadas.

They will soften with the moisture in the other ingredients but will still retain a bit of crunch around the edges.

This sounds like a wonderful concept. Will try it soon. Thanks, Andie.

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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I've only heard of tinga from chicken, with a mass of onions, but the pork sounds good, too.

As "bachelor father". tostadas are a godsend. Everyone can have then as they like as long as they have a good solid slop of my refried beans as the base. Salsas, meat or shrimp, lettuce, crema, cheese, etc as they like. It's fun and pretty easy, as long as you have good beans.

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I've only heard of tinga from chicken, with a mass of onions, but the pork sounds good, too.

As "bachelor father". tostadas are a godsend. Everyone can have then as they like as long as they have a good solid slop of my refried beans as the base. Salsas, meat or shrimp, lettuce, crema, cheese, etc as they like. It's fun and pretty easy, as long as you have good beans.

I am curious as to what are good beans versus not so good beans. This is a bit of a puzzle. :hmmm:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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