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nextguy

Recommendations for Wagyu preparation

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Hi all,

I just purchased a 6 ounce piece of Canadian Wagyu strip loin. The butcher says it comes from Alberta so I suspect it must be an Angus/Wagyu mix. How would you guys prepare it? The steak came frozen in a vaccuum bag and is very thin. My wife wants to try it sashimi style but I am not a fan of that. Rare is fine but raw is not too interesting for me.

TIA!

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How about heating up a cast iron skillet then drops strips in and pull them back out and eat...repeat till done.

If you have a good trivet or hot pad you could bring the pan to the table, otherwise just eat standing at the stove

tracey


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I had it as a steak tatar which was pretty awesome but if your saying raw is out of the question .... I have also had it in a japanese hot pot preparation which I didn't care so much for and grilled on very hot salt stones at the table.

If you can't get your hands on salt blocks I would 2nd the very hot pan. Just don't overcook em, I don't think you get much color onto them without melting away the fat.

JK

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Of course you and your wife can each have it as you like. In the spirit of serving seared, you could do that the Japanese way using a torch, and call it 'tataki' or 'aburi', as in 'gyuniku tataki', 'gyuniku aburi'.


Edited by Blether (log)

QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.

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Do you know what the grade of the beef is?

With striploin I either:

a) Slice finely (3mm slices aprox.) and grill for the briefest of times on charcoal both sides. Add a pinch of sea salt, squeeze of lemon and you're in wagyu heaven.

b) Slice into 6cm (circa 2") portions and grill for 2 minutes each side on charcoal (I'm sure a broiler would do in a pinch). Rest in a warm spot for 5 mins. Sprinkle with sea salt. Slice and serve with lemon wedge on the side.

You may need to experiment with the thicker grilling - non-fullblood wagyu seems to cook slower than full blood and lower grades (less than 9+) need a little more.

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Wagyu comes with its own in-built fat storage. You shouldn't oil the pan as this could intefere with the natural taste.

Make sure you bring the meat up to room temperature before cooking it.

Don't overcook. You want to cook and retain the internal fat, not melt it away. Aim for medium at the most. Also, I wouldn't recommend undercooking thicker steaks: the fat in the middle doesn't cook properly, creating a less than pleasant eating experience.

If it's very, very thinly sliced, it could have been cut for Shabu Shabu. In this case, you can cook it by dredging it backwards and forwards in a pot of simmering dashi stock (think Japanese fondue). Then use a ponzu or sesame dipping sauce.


Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
My eG Foodblog

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Wagyu comes with its own in-built fat storage. You shouldn't oil the pan as this could intefere with the natural taste.

Japan Premium Beef includes an extra cube of fat with its washugyu beef for just this purpose.

I've noticed that they now sell dry-aged beef, so it may be time for another visit.

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Not sure about the grade of the beef. I will try to take a picture of it when I can. Sadly my butcher only started selling this cut and is not as informed about it as I would like. He didn't know the specifics of how the cattle were raised or of its exact provenance. Only that it comes from Alberta. In any case, it looks nice. Not as marbled as some other pieces I have seen. I will perhaps try cooking it sous-vide at maybe 118 for half an hour. That method would probably result in the least fat loss. Maybe I'll finish it by searing with a torch.

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Well, raw would be my personal preference, with cured foie gras shaved on top.

However, if that's not to you taste, I would do it as Korean han-u. It's already a thin cut, as you say, so simple give it a bit of seeing to from flame (or a table top skillet with a couple of drops of sesame), hit it with fresh ground pepper and salt as it sizzles, and then pull it off quick before it's overcooked and have it with rice and spring onion/chili powder/sesame oil.

Come to think of it, a Sichuan hot pot would be good too. I've had wagyu in hot pot, and, like the Korean method, you can control how well done you want it.

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Every Tom, Dick and Harry is cashing in on the Wagyu gravy train whether or not the beef even approaches the Japanese Grading Standard. So if you don't have a grade for your Wagyu, then you can treat it as ordinary beef or what we have found is the best way to treat A5 Kobe and how it's done at some bars in Japan, is too cut into cubes and briefly grill each side which brings out the great flavor while not over cooking the beef and still leaving it rare to raw. It can be good as sashimi but we have found that we enjoy it best briefly seared as described. A variety of dipping sauces can also be enjoyed.

I have seen a lot of Wagyu beef lately that does not even look as good as USDA Prime sold in grocery stores. A5 Kobe will look almost white due to the fat content and a good grade of Wagyu should have a lot of marbling.- Dick

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