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Lior

Fruit Ganache

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I don't know if any of you have used this chart - just click on "chocolate makers" and you get this chart.

1. What is the difference between the first set of "fruit ganaches" and "chocolate molded sweets" as at the END both say to pour into the frame.

I also noticed that no white choc is included and in the chocolate molded sweets-only milk choc is used. Also quite a lot of sugars are incorporated- Why different ones and so much? I see no cream is used either... but only butter.

The "praline for molding and cutting" is intriguing as it uses gianduja, hazelnut paste and praline.

Any thoughts or comments?

Thanks


Edited by Lior (log)

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I loaded up the French version and compared the two; turns out it's just a translation error.

The first set, "fruit ganaches," are for slabbing. The second set, "Chocolate Molded Sweets," are for molded bonbons.

Here's a link to the French language version: Boiron Chocolatier PDF.

Hope this helps.


Edited by John DePaula (log)

John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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Ilana,

I did quite a few experiments with fruit ganache and just out of experimenting, found that a butter based ganache works best. It was later that I noticed in one of the big boy books that all of their fruit based ganache used butter but there was no explanation of this. My own deduction is that you can use more fruit puree when no cream is used and therefore get a better flavour. The butter provides the fat. Milk chocolate is used to 'soften' (especially with acidic fruits) and it gives the illusion that cream has been used. I wish I had that chart BEFORE I did all my experiments and came to the exact same conclusion as they did: Fruit puree + butter and milk + dark chocolate.

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Got it- thanks John and Lana. Maybe now my mango will be better!! I seem to have realized that I often miss/ignore the obvious at times. What I should pick up right away can take me 2 years to realize!!

I get into all the nitty gritty and ignore important basics-oof! :rolleyes:

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I have made the Boiron mango and guava ganaches for molding quite a few times and think that they are quite excellent. They have also been very popular with people that get chocolates from me. But these are the ones that are made with white chocolate. The fruit flavors come through very strongly and you really can't taste the white chocolate. The ones that I made came from Boiron's Journal du Fruit from Autumn 2006 at this web site. Incidentally, they also make an excellent macaron filling.

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Passionfruit ganache without cream is another great one (use milk chocolate)

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Hey Guys,

 

I realise that there are probably one million and one topics/threads/conversations on ganache on here and I've scoured the site looking for an answer, but haven't found anything that specifically covers this topic.

 

So, I'm no chocolate/ganache expert by any means, but I just recently discovered fruit ganache - I had no idea I could make ganache with literally fruit puree and chocolate....no cream!

 

So I made a bunch of fruit ganaches to fill some macarons that I made, and they were fab, however I also want to use them in my cakes (wedding/birthday cakes).  My problem is that once my cakes are filled, they get covered in a layer of standard white, milk or dark ganache and then they don't go back in the fridge - they are kept at room temperature until they are served.

 

My question is about shelf stability.  I know that my standard recipes for milk, white and dark chocolate ganache are absolutely fine at room temperature for a good long time, but what about Fruit Ganache??

 

To give you guys an idea of what I am using, the recipe I used was equal weights of chocolate to fruit puree - I melted the chocolate over a bain marie and heated the fruit puree until hot, but not boiling, then combined both together.  At these ratios, the firmness was probably slightly softer than I would prefer, so I do intend on decreasing the fruit puree amount, but it was still lovely.

 

I understand this might not be an easy question to answer, having read about water activity and how it varies depending on water and fat content etc, but any information you guys have would be greatly appreciated.

 

Thanks,

 

Jo.

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You really would need to measure the water activity to estimate the safety.  Or do a study where you set pieces aside and look at them every couple of days to see when they get mouldy.


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)

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Hi Jo.

 

This topic may have some relevant information for you - there's some discussion of the shelf life of fruit ganaches, anyway.


Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

eGullet Ethics Code signatory

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You may want to research water based ganaches. In general, the idea I think, is to make a "cream" from water and oil. The water in the puree, oil and the fruit. SO I guess you need to experiment or figure out water content. Good luck.

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Further to Lior's post - if you have a cream based ganache that has a decent shelf life - replace 65% of the cream (by weight) with puree and 35% of the cream (by weight) with a neutral oil.  It will look  a little different as it's setting up - but it will have the same aW as your original recipe (or perhaps a bit lower because puree is not 100% water though we calculate as if it is).  

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Further to Lior's post - if you have a cream based ganache that has a decent shelf life - replace 65% of the cream (by weight) with puree and 35% of the cream (by weight) with a neutral oil.  It will look  a little different as it's setting up - but it will have the same aW as your original recipe (or perhaps a bit lower because puree is not 100% water though we calculate as if it is).  

Kerry,

But how would it taste?  I can't quite imagine that replacing the dairy taste of cream with oil would be palatable.  What about using butter--or would that overwhelm the purée's taste?  I know that butter ganaches often end up with a weak fruit taste.

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