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. . . eggs were taboo? Just a few years ago, you couldn't find an egg dish in an American fine-dining restaurant. Now, it seems that no menu is complete without one.

Next?

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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The phrase "Molecular Gastronomy" hadn't been invented.

Roy Rogers actually had excellent roast beef and quality buns.

"There's nothing like a pork belly to steady the nerves."

Fergus Henderson

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I remember going grocery shopping with my Mom and watching her check the little window on the back of the bacon package to get a cut with some meat -- not all fat. Now, I check the window to find the fattiest package; pork is so damn lean these days that you might as well be eating tenderloin as bacon.

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1. ...Canadian candy bars tasted so much better than American ones?

2. ...ground beef contained enough fat that it didn't crumble when you cooked it?

3. ...we were told that the meal of the future would consist entirely of hypernutritious pills (no muss, no fuss, no dishes to wash!)?

4. ...every "Chinese" dish contained celery?

5. ...the name of an ingredient was seldom more than two syllables long, and none of them were "bi-," "di-," "poly-," or "mono-"?

6. ...an Obama could not eat at the same lunch counter as a Bush?

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I remember walking through a neighborhood in San Francisco in the late '50s and being able to accurately guess what was cooking as we passed each home: (Italian, seafood, pot roast, hamburgers, fried liver and onions).

The range of aromas today would rigorously test even the most dedicated food fanatic.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Celery sticks with cream cheese was considered an appropriate appetizer.

Vegetables came from a can all winter long (and maybe all summer too).

Women wore pretty kitchen aprons and men wore a tie for weekday dinners at home. Or was that just on TV? :laugh:

"There's nothing like a pork belly to steady the nerves."

Fergus Henderson

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Celery sticks with cream cheese was considered an appropriate appetizer.

Vegetables came from a can all winter long (and maybe all summer too).

Women wore pretty kitchen aprons and men wore a tie for weekday dinners at home.  Or was that just on TV?  :laugh:

Either way, when those things were true, the TV would often be on, given pride of place at the head of the table, during dinner. Featuring the Vietnam war.

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Celery sticks with cream cheese was considered an appropriate appetizer.

It still is at my house, half the family is under four years old.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .

Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .

Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

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