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Quadrupling a cookie recipe - question


Dieck
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I am trying to quadruple a favorite cookie recipe. I thought I had heard somewhere that when you are doing this, you don't quadruple the leavening or the salt. Is this true?

I've been trying to search for how to do this but I don't seem to be using the right terms. Can anyone point me in the right direction?

Many thanks.

My blog: Rah Cha Chow

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Hi, Dieck,

Adjusting the leavening and salt quantities applies to cakes; cookies can be scaled up or down with no adjustments. Feel free to quadruple the recipe, although, be sure before you do that your mixer can handle that much dough!

Good luck!

Eileen

Eileen Talanian

HowThe Cookie Crumbles.com

HomemadeGourmetMarshmallows.com

As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists. ~Joan Gussow

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Hi, Dieck,

Adjusting the leavening and salt quantities applies to cakes; cookies can be scaled up or down with no adjustments. Feel free to quadruple the recipe, although, be sure before you do that your mixer can handle that much dough!

Good luck!

Eileen

Hmmm, I always quadruple all the ingredients, including the leavening and salt.

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Hmmm, I always quadruple all the ingredients, including the leavening and salt.

I think what Eileen was saying was that when you quadruple (double, triple, etc) a cookie recipe, all ingredients are increased equally. In other words, yes, quadruple everything.

There are some who adjust the leavening and salt in cake recipes in a different ratio to the rest of the ingredients when they increase or decrease the yield of the recipe. As to exactly why, I don't know. I've never done this, or felt a need to. If I quadruple a cake recipe, I also quadruple the leavening and salt. I've never had my cakes turn out differently or negatively because I keep the ratios the same.

Anyone care to explain why salt and leavening are "adjusted" when increasing or decreasing the yield of a cake formula? :unsure:

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Anyone care to explain why salt and leavening are "adjusted" when increasing or decreasing the yield of a cake formula? :unsure:

It's a Rose Levy Berenbaum thing. I've read it and it looks good on paper but I never do it either. I loaned that book to someone or I'd be more specific.

"The larger the cake, the less amount of baking powder per cup of flour is used. This is because the distance from the sides of the pan to the center are greater so that they batter needs a stronger structure to support itself."

From her website.

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"The larger the cake, the less amount of baking powder per cup of flour is used. This is because the distance from the sides of the pan to the center are greater so that they batter needs a stronger structure to support itself."

Thanks for that info K8! :smile:

I don't quite buy this though. Especially considering that my cakes, both large and small, all come from the same batch of batter, and they're all fine. The only thing you gotta remember is that the smaller cakes come out of the oven first, because they take less time to bake.

The only adjustment I make in regard to larger cakes is I lower the oven temp so the edges aren't completely dried out before the center bakes.

Anyway, I know I'm off topic.

Back to uh, cookies........ :raz:

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Hmmm, I always quadruple all the ingredients, including the leavening and salt.

I think what Eileen was saying was that when you quadruple (double, triple, etc) a cookie recipe, all ingredients are increased equally. In other words, yes, quadruple everything.

There are some who adjust the leavening and salt in cake recipes in a different ratio to the rest of the ingredients when they increase or decrease the yield of the recipe. As to exactly why, I don't know. I've never done this, or felt a need to. If I quadruple a cake recipe, I also quadruple the leavening and salt. I've never had my cakes turn out differently or negatively because I keep the ratios the same.

Anyone care to explain why salt and leavening are "adjusted" when increasing or decreasing the yield of a cake formula? :unsure:

Yes, I meant that you can quadruple the entire cookie recipe. I didn't mean not to include the leavening in that process.

Eileen

Eileen Talanian

HowThe Cookie Crumbles.com

HomemadeGourmetMarshmallows.com

As for butter versus margarine, I trust cows more than chemists. ~Joan Gussow

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