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Lesley C

Separating Eggs

36 posts in this topic

crack the egg on a flat surface and separate with the shells , it really cuts through the white and I think is easier than scooping them out using hands.


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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For mayonnaise I always scoop out yolks by thoroughly washed or gloved hand. Salmonella lives on the shell of the egg, and it is important to reduce the contact time between the content of the egg and the outside of it.

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Years ago one-handed crack and break, with two eggs simultanous in the right hand and two in the left hand.

When I was in the Navy "chefs" would do this, but I never saw one do it with two in each hand. But then they were cracking eggs for over easy and weren't breaking the yolk. Got so I could do it but it's a little silly if you're only feeding a few people.

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A question for the pros here: I used to hear that at some places that do a huge brunch business (I mean REALLY huge), a prep cook might take a half-case of eggs, dump them in the mixer, give them a brief whirl, then strain the whole mess through a china cap to get out the shells. Any truth to that?

(Disclaimer: this sounds like something only a ::shudder:: chain restaurant would do. We certainly never did it anywhere that I worked brunch. :laugh: )

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No, you're right, I've seen that done in a big hotel. Why not just buy the eggs whole in liquid form?

When I worked in a patisserie in France I never separated a single egg because they bought the yolks and whites separately. Major time saver.

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A question for the pros here: I used to hear that at some places that do a huge brunch business (I mean REALLY huge), a prep cook might take a half-case of eggs, dump them in the mixer, give them a brief whirl, then strain the whole mess through a china cap to get out the shells.  Any truth to that?

(Disclaimer: this sounds like something only a ::shudder:: chain restaurant would do.  We certainly never did it anywhere that I worked brunch.  :laugh: )

I think I may have stopped someone from doing this *once*. Guy came from the same hotel chain that used to make a 90 yolk Hollandaise by dumping them into a Hobart 30 qt mixing bowl, set it to whip on low (use the wire whip) and light a coupla sternos under the bowl and let 'er rip while ladleing in hot clarified butter.

Oh jeez! I just gave y'all the proper definition of a shoemaker.

Ohhh, I gots stories'll curl your hair. :shock: :shock:

Nick :biggrin:

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Ohhh, I gots stories'll curl your hair. :shock: :shock:

Sounds like the start of a great thread, Nick--"What's your greatest culinary sin?"

Like mixing Dream Whip with canned chocolate pudding and selling it as chocolate mousse... (250 servings one desperate Sunday)


Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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One-handed opening, two hands at a time but only one egg in each hand.

Usually separate with hands but sometimes use shells. Always crack and separate over a bowl, never the other ingredients. That keeps pieces of shell or blood spots out. I can always backtrack if something goes awry.


--------------

Bob Bowen

aka Huevos del Toro

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No, you're right, I've seen that done in a big hotel. Why not just buy the eggs whole in liquid form?

When I worked in a patisserie in France I never separated a single egg because they bought the yolks and whites separately. Major time saver.

Probably because no one really analyzed the situation. They just saw that egg products cost more on a per-egg-part basis; but never considered the cost of staff-time. Or because they thought "fresh" shell eggs are somehow better. Right now, the thought of all those dirty shells in contact with the edible part gives me the willies. :shock:

'Scuse me, gotta go check out the sin thread. :biggrin: (Thanks, guys!!)

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the thought of all those dirty shells in contact with the edible part gives me the willies.  :shock:  

how about a major salmonella attack! :angry:

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