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Buttercream fillings in chocolates?


tammylc
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The new gourmet grocery here has an entire See's candy counter. After hearing quite a lot about See's here and there on eGullet, I figured I should find out what all the fuss was about. So far I've tried three flavors (there's always a sample tray out), and all of the were described as buttercreams (Bordeaux, pineapple, and lemon, for anyone who's curious). While much sweeter than anything I put in my chocolates, they were quite tasty, and now I'm wondering just what the heck a buttercream filling is in the context of chocolate? I have some (limited) familiarity with buttercream frosting for a cake, but this seems different.

Thanks!

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

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I consider a buttercream chocolate center to be a combination of fondant, butter and flavouring +/- nuts etc.

My mocca butter cream has fondant, butter, milk chocolate and mocca flavour.

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I think we have a discussion on this topic comewhere but I can think where ( maybe the confection candies ).Anyway If I recall someone had a recipe for a real buttercream wich seems similar to a fudge buttercream preparation.I dont think he post it , it was something he used to do at work ( I think was Robert from the Chocolate forum ).But definately you can reproduce that kinda of filling like Kerry proposed, probably much easier than the first.

Vanessa

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I think we have a discussion on this topic comewhere but I can think where ( maybe the confection candies ).Anyway If I recall someone had a recipe for a real buttercream wich seems similar to a fudge buttercream preparation.I dont think he post it , it was something he used to do at work ( I think was Robert from the Chocolate forum ).But definately you can reproduce that kinda of filling like Kerry proposed, probably much easier than the first.

Yup, we did have this discussion before. Here is a link.

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The buttercream centers that I have made in the past are from the "Antoinette Pope School Candy Book" dated 1949. If they are the same "buttercreams" that you are tasting, they are basically a fondant recipe that has a small amount of butter added after the sugar syrup has cooled on the marble...then you work it like fondant till it is cool and thick. Some people really like them but I think that they are too sweet. I hope this helps....

While I am here, I want to take this opportunity to let all of you know how impressed I am with your breadth of knowledge and supportive nature. Marshmallows brought me here and I haven't left.

Thank you :smile: ,

Amelia

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The buttercream centers that I have made in the past are from the "Antoinette Pope School Candy Book" dated 1949.  If they are the same "buttercreams" that you are tasting, they are basically a fondant recipe that has a small amount of butter added after the sugar syrup has cooled on the marble...then you work it like fondant till it is cool and thick.  Some people really like them but I think that they are too sweet.  I hope this helps....

While I am here, I want to take this opportunity to let all of you know how impressed I am with your breadth of knowledge and supportive nature. Marshmallows brought me here and I haven't left. 

Thank you :smile: ,

Amelia

Glad to have you with us Amelia.

I've got that book too - it's a great old candy making book. So basically it's describing a buttercream as the same thing that the Kendrick book would call cream fondant.

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I do some buttercream fillings and they usually consist of: butter, chocolate, and flavouring. A recipe I use that I got from Bernard Callebaut is as follows:

4 ounces white chocolate (3 if dark), 2 ounces butter. 1/16 cup so about 1 tablespoon liqueur. I use a wafer mould and pipe the buttercream on and make the bonbon look like a cookie. Any liqueur will work. Baja rosa is popular. In the last year I have been using ice wine. You must temper the chocolate then add the butter and whisk together, then add the alcohol last.

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I do some buttercream fillings and they usually consist of: butter, chocolate, and flavouring.  A recipe I use that I got from Bernard Callebaut is as follows:

4 ounces white chocolate (3 if dark), 2 ounces butter. 1/16 cup so about  1 tablespoon liqueur.  I use a wafer mould and pipe the buttercream on and make the bonbon look like a cookie. Any liqueur will work. Baja rosa is popular. In the last year I have been using ice wine.  You must temper the chocolate then add the butter and whisk together, then add the alcohol last.

That sounds like what Greweling calls a "butter ganache," right?

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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Not sure Chris.  I have not studied his buttercream recipes. What I have posted is what Bernard Callebaut taught me 10 years ago in a tempering course.

Over here I have an example of one of Greweling's "butter ganache" recipes... is that sort of what you are talking about?

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

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That sounds like what Greweling calls a "butter ganache," right?
Chris, that's what I thought too. I made the Lemon Logs and they used white chocolate, butter, fondant, and lemon juice/zest.

I was curious if butter ganache and butter cream were actually the same thing, and it sounds like they are. I prefer the term butter ganache though, because butter cream makes me think of cheap boxed chocolates. The lemon logs that I made had much better texture and flavor than what I typically think of as butter cream…I guess that’s what fresh, quality ingredients will do for you.

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That sounds like what Greweling calls a "butter ganache," right?
Chris, that's what I thought too. I made the Lemon Logs and they used white chocolate, butter, fondant, and lemon juice/zest.

I was curious if butter ganache and butter cream were actually the same thing, and it sounds like they are. I prefer the term butter ganache though, because butter cream makes me think of cheap boxed chocolates. The lemon logs that I made had much better texture and flavor than what I typically think of as butter cream…I guess that’s what fresh, quality ingredients will do for you.

Not all of Grewling's butter ganaches use fondant. Some use jam, others honey, etc. The raspberry butter ganache i make doesn't have any extra sweetener at all.

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

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Thanks Tami for your question. I've been trying to find and buttercream filling recipe for years for chocolate centers. If you are interested there is a course being offered at the San Francisco Baking institute called 'Gourmet Continenatal Chocolates'. It's a one week course being offered by Richardson Reserches who have in the past done the course on the UC Davis Campus but they are renovating the building they normally use and this year only it's at the SFBI. It's $1925.00 but well worth it in my opinion. It's from Oct 6 thru 10. Some of the confections covered will be Raspberry Noyau, Butter Pecan Cream, Strawberry Cream, Orange Almond Nougat, Brandied Cherry, Guanduja Truffle, English Toffee, Krokant, Mocha Triangle, Amandines, to name a few. They give you the recipes to all the confections and you take home the chocolates you make. Let me know if you want more info and I can give the link to you all here.

Edited by renam (log)
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The buttercream centers that I have made in the past are from the "Antoinette Pope School Candy Book" dated 1949.  If they are the same "buttercreams" that you are tasting, they are basically a fondant recipe that has a small amount of butter added after the sugar syrup has cooled on the marble...then you work it like fondant till it is cool and thick.  Some people really like them but I think that they are too sweet.  I hope this helps....

While I am here, I want to take this opportunity to let all of you know how impressed I am with your breadth of knowledge and supportive nature. Marshmallows brought me here and I haven't left. 

Thank you :smile: ,

Amelia

Glad to have you with us Amelia.

I've got that book too - it's a great old candy making book. So basically it's describing a buttercream as the same thing that the Kendrick book would call cream fondant.

I believe Bruce Weinstein's Ultimate Candy book has a fondant type buttercream recipe too. I've always meant to play with it.

Pamela Wilkinson

www.portlandfood.org

Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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I grew up eating See's chocolates, and when I wanted to reproduce for my own shop the chocolate buttercream eggs that were my favorite Easter treat, I turned up a recipe online from either Bernard Callebaut or Barry Callebaut, don't remember which. It calls for 12 ounces milk chocolate to 8 ounces (sweet) butter, temper the chocolate and add the softened butter. To my memory, which may well be faulty (it's been a while), this is what I used to look for every Easter. I've used it just that way, encased in a dark chocolate shell, for about 8 years. I initially labelled them chocolate buttercreams, but as my understanding of 'chocolates' and customers' expectations grew, I relabelled them 'chocolate butter.' After reading the above entries, I'm tempted to try some liqueur additions for some flavoring.

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I grew up eating See's chocolates, and when I wanted to reproduce for my own shop the chocolate buttercream eggs that were my favorite Easter treat, I turned up a recipe online from either Bernard Callebaut or Barry Callebaut, don't remember which.  It calls for 12 ounces milk chocolate to 8 ounces (sweet) butter, temper the chocolate and add the softened butter.  To my memory, which may well be faulty (it's been a while), this is what I used to look for every Easter.  I've used it just that way, encased in a dark chocolate shell, for about 8 years.  I initially labelled them chocolate buttercreams, but as my understanding of 'chocolates' and customers' expectations grew, I relabelled them 'chocolate butter.'  After reading the above entries, I'm tempted to try some liqueur additions for some flavoring.

This is what Grewling calls a butter ganache. For flavoring, a lot of his recipes have you mix jam into the butter before adding the chocolate. Or honey or another liquid sweetener, and then fruit puree.

Tammy's Tastings

Creating unique food and drink experiences

eGullet Foodblogs #1 and #2
Dinner for 40

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I have been looking into couple of online candy books I have found and I got a couple of recipes that might be on the right track.

This is from Fancy Cakes and candy, Farmer, Fannie Merritt. 1918.The Boston cooking school cooking book.

I am not entirly sure I can actually post it here the way it is, if not please feel free to remove it and I can PM to whoever needs it.

Chocolate Cream Candy

2 cups sugar 1 tablespoon butter

2/3 cup milk 2 squares unsweetened chocolate

1 teaspoon vanilla

Put butter into granite saucepan; when melted, add sugar and milk. Heat to boiling-point; then add chocolate, and stir constantly until chocolate is melted. Boil thirteen minutes, remove from fire, add vanilla, and beat until creamy and mixture begins to sugar slightly around edge of saucepan. Pour at once into a buttered pan, cool slightly, and mark in squares. Omit vanilla, if desired, and add, while cooking, one-fourth teaspoon cinnamon.

Vanessa

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The new gourmet grocery here has an entire See's candy counter. After hearing quite a lot about See's here and there on eGullet, I figured I should find out what all the fuss was about. So far I've tried three flavors (there's always a sample tray out), and all of the were described as buttercreams (Bordeaux, pineapple, and lemon, for anyone who's curious).  While much sweeter than anything I put in my chocolates, they were quite tasty, and now I'm wondering just what the heck a buttercream filling is in the context of chocolate? I have some (limited) familiarity with buttercream frosting for a cake, but this seems different.

Thanks!

I was in that market on Tuesday and I was totally thinking about you Tammy. I love See's and am always lamenting the fact that they're arent any local. Well, now at least there is one 3hrs from me instead of 3,000 miles. My favorite is coconut buttercream and I was thinking " I wonder if Tammy can make this". I was {} close to buying a pound but 20.00 a pound, while a good value( especially for the quality is a bit more than I can afford right now. Did you try the scotch mallow bars?. Those are another favorite and I did buy 2 bars to bring back home with me. Sadly, they're gone now : (.

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I grew up eating See's chocolates, and when I wanted to reproduce for my own shop the chocolate buttercream eggs that were my favorite Easter treat, I turned up a recipe online from either Bernard Callebaut or Barry Callebaut, don't remember which.  It calls for 12 ounces milk chocolate to 8 ounces (sweet) butter, temper the chocolate and add the softened butter.  To my memory, which may well be faulty (it's been a while), this is what I used to look for every Easter.  I've used it just that way, encased in a dark chocolate shell, for about 8 years.  I initially labelled them chocolate buttercreams, but as my understanding of 'chocolates' and customers' expectations grew, I relabelled them 'chocolate butter.'  After reading the above entries, I'm tempted to try some liqueur additions for some flavoring.

The recipe is Bernard Callebaut and it is the same version I posted, but I reduced the recipe because this 12 oz chocolate...will produce a large batch of buttercream. I am a purist and this is a buttercream style bonbon, which is different from a buttercream frosting. Depending on what a chocolatier does with the buttercream filling, for me, adding fondant cheapens and sweetens my bonbons. For me, it no longer becomes a buttercream. We all have are own definitions of what bonbons should be. I am pleased with the many applications and flavours that a buttercream can provide.

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