Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
Tri2Cook

White chocolate consomme

Recommended Posts

The Ideas in Food people did it. I read about a white chocolate and creme fraiche consomme on another site. They don't give any detailed (or even vague) information about what they actually did on either site so I'm going to figure it out for myself or (even better) with some help from folks here that have already done it or have some ideas for it. I'm going to start with the most basic and obvious version, water and white chocolate, and go from there. Please join in. If you have ideas but don't have the time or the desire to experiment, throw them in here anyway.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well i guess melted white chocolate, creme fraiche and water mixed up is the only way forward. It doesn't matter if it splits, which it will, because youre clarifying it anyway.

Having said that, theres a HB recipe around where he made a chocolate chantilly with dark chocolate and water, which ive had success with. Maybe you could make that with white chocolate, and clarify that. Dont know if white chocolate would react the same was as dark though.

I would go for the gelatin clarification btw, works a treat. I made a banana consomme ages ago, wasnt nearly strong enough, but as far as clarity is concerned, it was gorgeous.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Power of Passion blog is where I saw that white chocolate/creme fraiche version, I just couldn't remember the name so thanks for that.

I'll definitely be using the syneresis filtering, that's pretty much the only way I've been doing clarifications since I started playing around with it early last summer. Sometimes I use a Buchner funnel and vacuum flask for small test batches but otherwise it's the gelatin every time.

That HB recipe is actually a Herve This recipe that HB demonstrated in the chocolate episode of Kitchen Science, he gave HT full credit during the segment (he also did a chocolate and blue cheese ganache in that episode as well as a quick run-through of the Chocolate Delice they do at the Fat Duck).

Thanks for the input, keep 'em coming!


Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, I have two batches in the freezer. Batch one is at it's most basic, just water and white chocolate. Batch two is water and white chocolate that I bolstered with the flavor components of the white chocolate. I added some cocoa butter, a vanilla bean, a little sugar and some dry milk powder. Both were heated, sealed, allowed to cool, the fat skimmed off, heated enough to dissolve the gelatin, chilled then tossed in the freezer. I'll dump them in filters tomorrow and see what I get on monday.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any experimental consomme pr0n for us? :D Would love to see how you made the base liquid.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

what proportions of liquid to solids you use?


“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll give you a hint - gelatin filtration.

Edit: Well, that will teach me to pay more attention before I reply. For some reason I just didn't see that there were already several replies to this post. Glad to see that you're making some progress on this.


Edited by naes (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Any experimental consomme pr0n for us? :D Would love to see how you made the base liquid.

Sorry, didn't take any pics of the process. There wasn't really much to show. Toss the solids in a pan, add water, heat over low heat. Seal with plastic wrap, infuse until cool, skim fat. Soak gelatin, heat liquid, dissolve in gelatin. I cooled it in a water bath just to speed things up a little. Fridge until gelled and toss it in the freezer.

The liquid in both batches tasted nicely of white chocolate before filtering with a nod to the bolstered batch for strength of flavor but maybe just using more white chocolate would have worked just as well. It seems too simple at this point so I'm not feeling confident that I'll have what I'm looking for after filtering. Then again, toast is pretty simple and I can't think of one good reason to make it any more complicated so we'll see.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've tried doing something similar, "brown" chocolate consomme. I basically did a classic drinking chocolate (receipe from one of Steingartens books, cocolate, cocoa, milk, sugar, heat/blend/froth - tastes wonderfully) and then did a gelatine filtration. The end product was clear, light brown and didn't taste very good.

The taste was a bit harsh and chemical, even though I used reasonably upmarket ingredients and the chocolate tasted good before filtration. There was definitely a chocolatey taste to the consomme, but not a nice one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting. I've done regular chocolate consomme several times and I've been happy with the results but I use Sam Mason's recipe or variations on that (except that I clarify it with gelatin instead of a raft). For some strange reason, I haven't used it in sweet applications much. The last time I made it, I used it and a grapefruit consomme with fish.

I have my first white chocolate consomme. The pics will have to wait until tomorrow but the first impression is both good and bad.

The good:

It tastes like white chocolate. Not just sweet and vanilla but actual white chocolate, the cocoa butter left it's mark. I think the one that I didn't add anything to is the better of the two. It's lighter in flavor but it's not as sweet. Maybe I'll try a batch with vanilla bean and extra cocoa butter but no extra sugar just to see how that goes.

The bad:

1. It didn't clarify as much as I would have liked. There's not a lot of cloudiness but there's more than I can live with so I'm going to try a second filtration.

2. The color. It's not the greatest. Of all the colors it could be it had to go with "watered down urine sample yellow".

I'll get a picture tomorrow before I hit it with more gelatin for a second filtering.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Interesting. I've done regular chocolate consomme several times and I've been happy with the results but I use Sam Mason's recipe or variations on that (except that I clarify it with gelatin instead of a raft). For some strange reason, I haven't used it in sweet applications much. The last time I made it, I used it and a grapefruit consomme with fish.

Ok, thanks. Will try again with some other chocolate (think I used Lindt the first time) and no milk and sugar.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

why would anybody want to do a white chocolate consomme??

in essence the flavour of white chocolate is just the added vanilla (or vanillin). cocoa butter doesnt have a strong enough taste to be consommified :wacko::blink:

cheers

t.


toertchen toertchen

patissier chocolatier cafe

cologne, germany

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
cocoa butter doesnt have a strong enough taste to be consommified

Ummm... the liquid I have will disagree with you on that.

I'm not sure if there is much of a point to it. I'm just having fun.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a quick note that Alex and Aki at Ideas in Food mention, in this post, that they put buttermilk in their white chocolate consomme, to balance it.

I don't have a lot of experience with the gelatin filtration process, so I'm watching this thread eagerly! I'd love to hear more about the dark chocolate consomme, too. Can Sam Mason's recipe be found online somewhere?


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just a quick note that Alex and Aki at Ideas in Food mention, in this post, that they put buttermilk in their white chocolate consomme, to balance it.

I don't have a lot of experience with the gelatin filtration process, so I'm watching this thread eagerly! I'd love to hear more about the dark chocolate consomme, too. Can Sam Mason's recipe be found online somewhere?

Basically, he just dissolves chocolate and cocoa in hot water:

http://www.foodite.com/foodite/2006/10/pushing_chocola.html

As for the gelatine filtration, it is pretty simple. Dissolve 0.75% gelatine by weight in the liquid, freeze, and thaw in a fridge over a colander. There is a NY Times article on the subject by McGee. Perhaps someone has a link?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you can get by with 0.5% but use sheet gelatin as it seems to be more reliable than powder.

Let it set and then freeze.


“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
you can get by with 0.5% but use sheet gelatin as it seems to be more reliable than powder.

I realize this is starting to veer off topic, but what do you mean by more reliable? I just found a source of sheet gelatin near home, but it's many times more expensive than powder. Consequently, the only time I use it is when I don't want to dilute the liquid I'm gelling with the water I use to bloom the powder. Are there other reasons to go with sheets? And do you know of a Canadian mail-order source that might offer them at a lower price?

To bring this back on topic, though, has anyone had any luck heating chocolate consomme? Someone mentioned in the gelatin clarification thread that they can't be heated. I'd love to hear that that's not the case.


Matthew Kayahara

Kayahara.ca

@mtkayahara

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mkayahara, I tried to get by using powder because it was cheaper but could not rely on it's consistency. I made a few of the consommes that ideasinfood posted on their notebooks and the liquids didn't set uniformley. I found this explanation from Dana on tastingmenu blog...

"Those of my readers that work in professional kitchens will know this product well. Granulated gelatin is second rate. The amount of gelatin and the quality of the gelatin within the granulated form varies. The powder can contain a high amount of broken protein that will never re-bond into the triple helix’s that create the web like junctions. It can contain more or less of viable proteins from batch to batch, creating stronger and weaker gels than you expect. Plain and simple, it’s inconsistent. Unfortunately, it’s the only gelatin readily available to the average cook. I highly recommend finding a source for sheet gelatin if you plan to use much of it at home."

www.tastingmenu.com/2007/10/11/perfecting-panna-cotta/

I have access to wholesale here in the UK I do not know about Canada, sorry.


“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So here are the promised pics of round 1. As you can see, "white chocolate broth" is probably a more accurate description than "consomme" at this point. The flavor is very much white chocolate and was identified as such by 3 taste testers that were not given even the slightest hint about what I was having them taste (I have brave, but brutally honest, taste testers always willing to lend an opinion :laugh: ). The information about the buttermilk is interesting, I hadn't seen that so thanks! I can see where they're coming from with that, the stuff is pretty sweet. The first word out of two of the tasters mouths was "chocolate" followed by "actually, I'd say white chocolate" (the other taster said "white chocolate" right off) so I feel confident that the cocoa butter lends itself to the result and that it's not just me wanting it to be there.

gallery_53467_4795_2239.jpggallery_53467_4795_22022.jpg

The little design in the bottom of the glass is under ~5 cm (2") of the liquid which gives some idea of the level of cloudiness (but not a completely accurate idea, I have a decent camera but I suck at photography and the pics turned out somewhat grainy this time for some reason). This batch is back in the freezer with more gelatin for round 2 of filtering and I'm going to get a new batch going with some of the ideas that have come up tomorrow.


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wow. This sounds amazing and I'd love to try it! Is there a vegetarian alternative to using gelatine or eggs to clarify? Would agar agar do the same thing?

Agar wouldn't work. I guess you need a gelling agent that is thermo reversible, ie melts when the temperature gets higher and sets when it gets lower.

Anyone have suggestions?


Edited by TheSwede (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wow. This sounds amazing and I'd love to try it! Is there a vegetarian alternative to using gelatine or eggs to clarify? Would agar agar do the same thing?

Agar wouldn't work. I guess you need a gelling agent that is thermo reversible, ie melts when the temperature gets higher and sets when it gets lower.

Anyone have suggestions?

Yeah, I'm not sure about that one either. The freezing does something to the structure of the gelatin that causes it to release the liquid upon thawing. I have no idea if agar reacts the same way. I'm willing to give it a try and let you know though. That is, unless someone pops in with a definite answer before I get to it.

Edit: A quick google search seems to indicate that agar is one of the things used to help combat syneresis so I'm not too hopeful... but I'll still give it a try.


Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By markg109
      Hi All,
      I am an artist ( oil and pastels) by trade so the coloring of artisan chocolates really appeals to me. I was wondering if I could make my own colored cocoa butter using oil candy colors and cocoa butter, or is there more involved.
      Also, if I add the oil candy color to white chocolate will it affect the temper?
      Thanks,
      Mark
    • By eglies
      Hi there, I’m looking for some interesting flavours for truffles. Any combination of filling and coating ideas? For lemon, dark ganache, orange and caramel example. 
      I also realised that when deciding to use ready made truffle shells filling needs to have a creamy texture. Any advice on this? 
    • By CharTruff
      Hello! 
       
      I am doing some spring cleaning and am selling some of my used polycarbonate molds. I've attached pictures and dimensions below.  The mold prices do not include shipping fee. I will ship these via USPS priority mail. 
       
      For estimation purposes only, 4 - 5 molds can fit in a medium box and it costs $15.05 to ship. Please let me know if you have any questions.  
       
      Thank you. 
      Charlotte W. 





    • By eglies
      Hello everyone!
       
      I was wondering if anyone could help me out with these design attached?
       
      I manage to make it on the table somehow and then when trying it into the mould it just doesnt work  
       
      Any tips on this ?
       
      Thank you!!

    • By ptw1953
      I am wishing to purchase some black cocao butter, but it is scarcer than hobby-horse sh*te here in the UK. I do have some cocao butter, and some black fat-soluble powder. Tips and tricks for the making of black cocao butter at home would be most welcome...
       
      ptw1953
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...