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Scrambled eggs in the microwave?


WednesdayGirl
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I like scrambled eggs for breakfast, especially since I started following a low-carb eating plan. I don't always have time to make them in the morning before work, however. Is it possible to prepare scrambled eggs in the microwave?

I should probably just try it myself and see, but I'd like to know if anyone else has tried it, and if so, whether it worked.

Thanks,

Amy

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You certainly can if you want to. Just beat the eggs up in a bowl with whatever seasoning take your fancy, add butter if that's your custom, then zap them. Keep your eye on them, because they rise up like an over-excited souffle, and they are not going to take long at all - seconds rather than minutes. Also, take them out and give them a good stir while they are still slightly underdone, because they will carry on cooking rapidly outside the microwave. My father used to make scrambled eggs this way.

Now the bad news. The texture is different from pan-scrambled eggs. Sort of denser and springier. Also, they seem to lose a lot of moisture. Slightly overcooked they become dry and rubbery.

So, a much less enjoyable dish, but it's your trade-off, of course, between quality and speed.

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It depends on how you like them scrambled, but most methods can't be reproduced in the microwave because the eggs just sit there whereas frequent stirring is an integral component of the way most people make scrambled eggs. What you get if you microwave a couple of beaten eggs in a shallow dish is something more like a plain omelet with a spongy texture. This is standard procedure in places like Subway and Dunkin' Donuts where they make breakfast sandwiches in the microwave. It's not the world's worst way to make eggs, but the reduced enjoyment probably isn't worth the time saved. You can scramble eggs pretty quickly on the stove if you have all your ingredients ready and use a high temperature. Are you familiar with the saucepan method? It's quite efficient. You put butter into a saucepan over high heat, dump in the beaten eggs, and stir with a whisk until you have scrambled eggs. It's maybe a 2.5 minute process, probably less, and it reproduces the taste of slowly cooked scrambled eggs. Jean-Georges Vongerichten does it this way.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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I live by myself and hate washing up dishes, but have been trying to seque into more protein in my diet. I've found that after eating protein I am not so sleepy, and don't get hungry again so quickly.

So, every morning, I break a couple eggs into a soup cup, give them a whirl or two and stick them in the microwave for about 45 seconds, then pull them out and stir them, add a little cheese, back in for 45 seconds or so. They do "scramble" as well as can be expected. Then I pull them out, pour a little salsa into the cup and eat with a spoon.

These are no one's idea of a gourmet scrambled egg, I assure you. And without the cheese and salsa, even less so. But I get my protein and only dirty up one dish that, since it has a handle, I can even take with me in the car if I have to.

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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I think you can make scrambled eggs in the microwave fine, but they are actually more difficult than in a pan. You have to keep opening the microwave and swirling them. Plus, you run a great risk of overcooking.

What could be simpler and quicker than scrambled eggs in a skillet. They're quick and you can easily observe when they are done perfectly.

Now, the best scrambled eggs are made in a double boiler, I think, and they do take a little longer.

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You can scramble eggs pretty quickly on the stove if you have all your ingredients ready and use a high temperature. Are you familiar with the saucepan method? It's quite efficient. You put butter into a saucepan over high heat, dump in the beaten eggs, and stir with a whisk until you have scrambled eggs. It's maybe a 2.5 minute process, probably less, and it reproduces the taste of slowly cooked scrambled eggs. Jean-Georges Vongerichten does it this way.

This is pretty much how I prepare scrambled eggs, too. It is so fast. Does produce a pan needing washing, but I think scrambled eggs skew "Worth It" on the variable How Fast Does It Need to Be, Anyway sliding scale of life.

One of the most important dishes in the world, in fact, scrambled eggs. Have used the Nero Wolfe/Fritz super slow method at times, too, but think I prefer anyway the quicker-cooked results. Tests continue, life-long.

Maybe it's just that for me the point of diminishing returns arrives quickly, in cooking and in other things, when Time is carved and re-carved into ever-more-minute increments.

Priscilla

Writer, cook, & c. ● #TacoFriday observant ●  Twitter    Instagram

 

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Where the microwave saves time, now I come to think of it, is cleaning the pan.

That's why the good lord invented dishwashers.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Thanks for the information, all! Cleaning the pan after using the skillet method doesn't really bother me; I usually do dishes at night, whereas I'm usually trying to save time in the morning before I head to work. Another issue is that I'm often not hungry when I first rise and leave for the office (around 7:00 am, usually) but I get hungry around 9. I think perhaps I'll use the skillet method at home on mornings where I have a few extra minutes, or I'm hungry before leaving, and take some eggs to work for when I need to use the micro instead. I appreciate everyone's input.

Amy

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If you're looking for a super-convenient make-ahead egg dish, go with a frittata. You can make a nice big one in the evening and it will last for a few days. Just refrigerate it, slice it like a pie, and just remove a wedge each time you want some eggs. The wedges are great at room temperature or can be heated in the microwave. Plus you have so much flexibility in terms of ingredients you can add, everything from potatoes to tomatoes to cured meats to fresh herbs.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Best scrambled eggs -

Beat your eggs together with salt and pepper. In a little butter, scramble them quickly.

THEN (and this is the most important part) exactly at the PENULTIMATE MOMENT - pour a little bit of cream or evap milk into the skillet and finish.

The eggs come out properly creamy, but fully cooked.

That's the way my grandmother taught me some forty years ago, and they're perfect every time.

And it isn't just me and my grandmama, by the way -

A few years ago, while perusing the Larousse Gastronomique, I noticed that they also say to do it that way: "Note - .... two or three tablespoons of fresh cream may be added after they are cooked."

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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My dishwasher won't clean scrambled eggs.  Dunno why, it just won't.

That's probably because they've become crusty and stubborn (like me) by the time you run the machine. To prevent this from happening, fill the vessel with warm water as soon as you finish cooking. Let it sit that way until it's dishwasher time, and the dishwasher should finish the job just fine.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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Among instantly portable egg dishes, frittata is beeyootiful, as Steven Shaw said. Also there is the deceptively lowly-seeming hard-boiled egg, the simple pleasure of which it behooves one to reacquaint oneself with from time to time.

Priscilla

Writer, cook, & c. ● #TacoFriday observant ●  Twitter    Instagram

 

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  • 8 years later...

Scrambled eggs can be made really well in a microwave-beat the eggs to your liking with a generous dash of cream - microwave for a brief time - take the eggs out of the micro before they are set - stir gently for large fluffy creamy moist curds- or less gently if you like a smaller curd. Can't advise on quantity or time, just experiment with your own microwave. I would prefer to cook scrambled eggs on a stove top- but its great to know how to do them if you find yourself stuck with only a microwave or a thin pan and a hopeless cooktop.

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My dad's formula for scrambled eggs in the microwave is as follows:

Mix two eggs with salt and pepper

Set microwave for 2 mins on high (you may not need whole 2 minutes, but shouldn't need more)

After 30 seconds, take eggs out and stir

Every 15 seconds thereafter, take eggs out and stir

Stop when eggs are still a bit runny, stir and let finish cooking with residual heat

They turn out pretty well - not exactly like stove cooked, but if you're attentive they won't get puffy and dry like people are describing above. And if you have a very high powered microwave, you might want to cut back on that first 30 second run...

Tammy's Tastings

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I'd be afraid to get something rubbery and would probably rather get up 5 min earlier, but then, I hardly ever eat breakfast...

But as a side note/idea, why not make a poached egg? Super easy in the microwave, I was surprised when I read this trick recently, worked great every time. Use a microwave safe bowl, I use a little pyrex bowl, add 1/2 cup water, drop an egg in, cover with a saucer and microwave for about one minute, done! You might have to adjust cooking time depending on your microwave. At one minute I get a perfectly poached egg, set whites and runny yolk. At 30 sec longer I get a hard cooked egg. Before you start, put a piece of toast in the toaster, once done add putter to toast, remove egg with slotted spoon, put on top, enjoy!

I was happy to finally get poached eggs perfect in the big pot of water with some vinegar (which I like for taste, not sure it does much otherwise) and the 'tornado swirl' method, but this is so much faster if you just need one or two eggs. I won't be cooking a gallon of water for two eggs anymore.

ETA: I was afraid of the exploding egg syndrome, which I got to enjoy twice in my life and it's NO fun, but nothing ever exploded and the saucer should keep things contained if it ever should. I think the water bath helps to even out heat build up and make microwave penetration more even as well. Of course, proceed at your own risk :cool:

Edited by OliverB (log)

"And don't forget music - music in the kitchen is an essential ingredient!"

- Thomas Keller

Diablo Kitchen, my food blog

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