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Grinding herbs


Dave the Cook
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I made a jerk dry rub tonight (my first time -- hold the applause, please). The recipe called for ground thyme. I understand why: a rub has to be fairly homogenous for application purposes. Tiny green leaves and a bunch of spicy dust doesn't work as a rub.

I tried a spice (aka "coffee") grinder, combing dried thyme leaves with toasted allspice berries in the hope that the commingling would help. I got a great load of allspice, and two unrepentant teaspoons of whole thyme.

Is mortar and pestle my best shot?

Dave Scantland
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dscantland@eGstaff.org
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Eat more chicken skin.

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The "ground thyme" sold in supermarket spice jars is pulverized to a fine powder. I'm not sure you can do that in such small quantities in a coffee grinder. I'd go the mortar-and-pestle route, separately from the allspice berries, which "bounce" therefore grind better mechanically.

SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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Thyme is almost unique among herbs in that its dried form is as useful (in a different way) as its fresh. So mincing thyme to within an inch of its life is not just tiresome, it's counterproductive.

Okay, I'll try the m&p. Smooth or ridged?

Dave Scantland
Executive director
dscantland@eGstaff.org
eG Ethics signatory

Eat more chicken skin.

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Thyme is almost unique among herbs in that its dried form is as useful (in a different way) as its fresh.

OK, what am I not understanding about rosemary, sage, marjoram, oregano, tarragon.....?

Thank God for tea! What would the world do without tea? How did it exist? I am glad I was not born before tea!

- Sydney Smith, English clergyman & essayist, 1771-1845

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when I make jerk I rub the thyme between the palms of my hands right into the mix...even if I am using the mortar and pestal there is something about the way it rubs that just gets all that flavor to the surface..same thing with sage ..I rub it too

that works perfectly!!!

..and even better if the dried thyme leaves are still on the sticks because then it rubs some of that flavor into the leaves as well ....

fantastic jerk is (in my opinion) like fantastic curry in that every spice that goes into it ..needs a moment of though and individual consideration as to how to get the best flavor so it will all meld together in the final taste

Edited by hummingbirdkiss (log)
why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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Thyme is almost unique among herbs in that its dried form is as useful (in a different way) as its fresh.

Thought I'd try again, since I honestly don't understand this statement. I use herbs frequently & am genuinely curious about what this means.

Does anyone have an answer, or even a guess?

Thank God for tea! What would the world do without tea? How did it exist? I am glad I was not born before tea!

- Sydney Smith, English clergyman & essayist, 1771-1845

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Thyme is almost unique among herbs in that its dried form is as useful (in a different way) as its fresh.

Thought I'd try again, since I honestly don't understand this statement. I use herbs frequently & am genuinely curious about what this means.

Does anyone have an answer, or even a guess?

I am guessing it means that it is as some herbs are more useful fresh or dried more then both this is one you can use equally as well dried and fresh ...

hope that helps

why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

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According to the World's Healthiest Foods site, both fresh and dried thyme have antioxidant properties, if that can be considered "useful".

But wouldn't most herbs retain their usefulness/antioxidant traits in fresh and dried form, anyway? :blink:

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when I make jerk I rub the thyme between the palms of my hands right into the mix...even if I am using the mortar and pestal there is something about the way it rubs that just gets all that flavor to the surface..same thing with sage ..I rub it too

that works perfectly!!!

..and even better if the dried thyme leaves are still on the sticks because then it rubs some of that flavor into the leaves as well ....

fantastic jerk is (in my opinion) like fantastic curry in that every spice that goes into it ..needs a moment of though and individual consideration as to how to get the best flavor so it will all meld together in the final taste

I second the rubbing- I too have found that it brings out a tremendous amount of flavour. I also find it easier simply crumbling the leaves than using pestle & mortar.

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