Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
melkor

eG Foodblog: melkor - Insert Clever Subtitle Here

Recommended Posts

Dave, great job so far. Two quick questions. Where do you get your boquerones? I'd be particularly glad to know of any mail order operations that you trust.

I usually get them at Tower market, though Whole Foods and others also sell them - a quick google search shows them available here but I don't know anything about the vendor. If you've got a Whole Foods near by I'd ask there. Dinon is the brand I usually buy.

Meanwhile:

What kind of sauté pan is that?

It's a 3 quart Bourgeat saucier - I love that pan, it's what I grab off the rack most often. It's a pain to keep the copper clean and the handle gets hot, but it's a great shape and it's really responsive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

gallery_7160_3936_10249.jpggallery_7160_3936_711.jpg

gallery_7160_3936_40865.jpggallery_7160_3936_5643.jpg

gallery_7160_3936_2662.jpggallery_7160_3936_38965.jpg

gallery_7160_3936_36493.jpggallery_7160_3936_50566.jpg

MsMelkor made french toast for breakfast this morning having made the challah last night. The apples are from the tree in the yard, cooked in some butter, maple syrup, and brown sugar. I did all the hard work for this morning's breakfast - making the lattes :smile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
[...]

Cooking with cognac is always fun :biggrin:

Absolutely!

Inspired by your previous flambé, I deglazed a tree oyster mushroom sauté with brandy last night.

Deee-licious, and I didn't even set off the smoke alarm!


---

Erik Ellestad

If the ocean was whiskey and I was a duck...

Bernal Heights, SF, CA

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your photos are making my mouth water! This has been a great blog although I've had to play catch up this week. Thanks for making my tummy rumble, I must go eat something now.


If only Jack Nicholson could have narrated my dinner, it would have been perfect.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We spent the day down around Union Square helping a friend get his shop ready to open. Lunch at Canteen, dinner at R & G Lounge. I'm too lazy to post the details but I've suckered MsMelkor into doing it. In the meantime there's a cheesecake in the fridge we should have for dessert.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Lunch at Canteen:

Melkor had a smoked salmon omelet, which was good except for the glob of cream cheese in the middle. I opted for the cardoon and goat cheese omelet with crisp roasted potatoes. The cardoons had a great texture - not at all slimy as they can be when they're overcooked - and the goat cheese added a tangy note. Melkor's latte was utterly forgettable.

Dinner at R&G:

I generally don't eat crab - although we don't keep kosher, it somehow seems wrong to eat pork and shellfish. But our friend wanted to try R&G, and it is dungeness crab season so...

We ordered the salt & pepper crab, the spicy garlic crab, along with the "special beef" and noodles. To start, we had vegetable egg rolls (nothing earth-shattering here) and soy sauce beef (a little cloying but surprisingly delicious). The beef was excellent, but my attention was focused on the CRAB!!! The salt and pepper crab was deep-fried, and the meat moist and sweet. The sauce on the other crab was as advertised - both spicy and garlicky - so the emphasis was less on the crabmeat itself and more on the interplay of the various components of the dish. Both crabs were huge...luckily there is always room for cheesecake...


allison

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

gallery_7160_3936_61894.jpg

Citron cheesecake and espresso to finish the night and the blog. Thanks for reading along for the week!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great blog, Dave

Thanks for sharing (and thank MsMelkor!)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for sharing your week with us, Dave. I love seeing how you eat, and your pictorials are just gorgeous.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This has been wonderful, and it's sad to see it come to a close.

Your photography is stunning, from the captured chrome-and-amber of your first cup to cauliflowerart, and all the others in between. Was that a nutmeg in little amethyst bowl, upper right? And milk in a bottle :wub:

It's lovely that you are both members, and that you enjoy cooking together so much. Thank you for the great week---it went by much too fast.

rachel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm thrilled to learn that you, too, enjoy Shalimar!  We always make a detour there when we're anywhere in the Bay Area.  I try to avoid using their restroom at all costs, but you can't beat the prices (or the free masala chai!).

Shalimar rocks. I've never set foot in the Shalimar restroom, and I've got no desire to change that. That neighborhood really has some of the best food in the city. Pagolac, Bodega Bistro, Shalimar, Thai House Express, Baguette Express... All delicious and cheap.

Thanks for a wonderful blog and in particular the enticing photos from Shalimar. I don't tend to look for Indian up in the city given our options down in "south bay" but it looks great.

So many wonderful meals; if I could pick only one to have right now I'd be hard pressed to choose.


"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

-- Gabriel Garcia Marquez, 1962 "Big Mama's Funeral"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great blog I've especially liked the pic's. Would you share your bread method with me. I usually make either an omelet or french toast for breakfast when my daughters' with me and Challah bread is her favorite. we really like it (french toast) when the breads 2 or 3 days old and we make it up the nite before and let it soak in the icebox that way it just takes 5 min in the morning and bingo.


Edited by doc slaughter (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks again - the blog has been fun to do, though at times it would be nice to have a pocket sized camera so I could comfortably take restaurant food photos.

ludja: I really like the south Indian food in the south bay, Shalimar is my favorite anywhere in the bay area for north Indian.

doc: I'll find the recipe and send it your way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you (both of you) for blogging. It's been a fun read, and I'm as agog at the photography as everyone else. I'm especially pleased that you finished with another photo of that way-cool demitasse.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Foodiversal
      Hi everybody! I'm Jake, I'm 26 and from the United Kingdom. I've recently left a career in science teaching and I really hope to pursue my true passion, food writing by becoming either a recipe developer, a food journalist, or both! I've launched my website today so thought it was a good time to get active in some online forums and say hello! I look forward to meeting and interacting with you all ❤️ 
    • By Panaderia Canadiense
      Hello again from south of the equator!  As you may or may not have heard (because the international news media isn't really giving the situation much coverage), Ecuador is in the grip of a major social protest movement.  This started on October 1, when fuel subsidies in the country were abruptly struck causing the prices of gasoline and diesel to more than double overnight.  Transport and heavy haulage unions immediately went on strike, and blocked the main roads of the cities with their vehicles in protest.  The indigenous movements of the central Sierra, beginning in my province, Tungurahua, joined the strike on October 2, and the President quickly declared a State of Emergency that restricts movement, freedom of the press, and freedom association.  The indigenous took over the road blockades on October 3, cutting the cities off from the world; Ambato became an island overnight.
       
      It is now October 8, one week into the blockades.  Shortages in the fresh markets and supermarkets began on Sunday, as people realized that we were in for a long-haul of protest and possibly an overthrow of the sitting government.  Ecuador's indigenous have a long history of deposing governments in this way, and it's not a fast process.
       
      I'll be blogging informally throughout the National Strike, to document how the inevitable food shortages affect the city and my own table. 
       
      These first pictures are from Sunday, October 6.  In the Mercado Mayorista, a place I've always taken you along to when I've blogged from Ambato, the cement floors of the naves are visible in places where they have never, in my experience, been exposed.  The fresh corn nave is all but abandoned - this is because all of the corn in the city's stock has been sold.  I'll remind you: a nave in this market is about a thousand square metres of space.  This is also missing the big trucks that come to trade fresh grains in the parking lot, because they couldn't make it through the roadblocks.  Most of the Mayorista is in the same situation - stocks are selling off fast.

       
      The supermarkets are even more dire.  The meat coolers are completely empty, and the produce shelves are diminishing quickly.



       
    • By Kerry Beal
      @Alleguede and I are in the lounge at Pearson awaiting our flight to Vegas for the IBIE (International Baking Industry Exhibition).
       
      I got the usually bomb sniffing swab done on my electronics - @Alleguede got the 3rd degree at customs. Anyone know what a carnet is? I believe I got that lecture the last time.
       

       
      Made myself a little cocktail, Maker's Mark, Grand Marnier, vintage port. I've had better! 
       

       
      Not a lot of choices to eat since it's rather late (not that earlier would have helped) - they also have pasta salad, Italian Wedding soup, Cream of mushroom soup, corn chips and salsa. There appear to be some cookies there as well. I'm trying to low carb as much as possible so I'm avoiding most of it.
       

       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
    • By ElsieD
      Host's note: the initial title of this thread was "Swarvin' in ???"  as a teaser.  Once the destination was identified as Newfoundland, the title was changed to reflect this.  The initial comments were based on the ??? In the title.
       
       
      And we'll soon be off.......culinary adventures to follow.

    • By ElsieD
      Some of you may recall that in 2016 I had a blog about our trip to Newfoundland.  We are going there again tomorrow for a week, returning July 1 and I thought that since we are going to, and eating at, places different from that year, I would do another blog.  When I booked our flights and accommodations (7 places in 8 nights) last February, June 23rd seemed like a long ways away.  Yet here we are, about to leave.   I hope some of you will follow along as we travel through the province.    
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...