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ALTAF

Cookbooks by Japanese chefs

8 posts in this topic

Hi,

I'm looking for pastry and baking books by japanease chefs written in english. Got an idea? site...etc

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Try posting in the Japan forum. Off the top of my head, everything that I know of is written in Japanese.


Baker of "impaired" cakes...

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Same here,

years ago, I had a set series similar to Thuries, but all written in Japanese,Incredible...the only other chef here in the DC was Mark Randolf that had the "series" and it was reflective of his showcase.

I have always said this, if they come here to our shores in mass, I am cashing out the equity on the house, and taking my wife and son to Brazil to open a sandwich shop. Japanese are a REAL FORCE to contend with, and should not be under estamated! They are not as progressive as the French, nor innovative as we Yanks,but they are masters at replication!

Try downtown Times Square in NY, if I remember they had a Japanese book store with Pro grade, material, when I dated a gal a few years ago from Queens. Good Luck on your quest...

Michael :wink:

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You could try the Demarle book, Exceptional Excursions with Flexipan. I thumbed thru it at the show and there wre quite a few recipes from Japanese chefs. However, it may not suit your requirements 100%.

Someone here once posted this awesome website www.cakechef.info and you can use altavista's babel fish programme to translate the site into English.

Hidemi Sugino's books (Which are like the Japanese versions of Pierre Herme's books) are must haves, but unfortunately, its in Japanese. You might also want to do a general search for books published by Kodansha International who have put out english cookbooks.

And Dejaq, maybe Brazil might not be a good place for you to move if you wanna avoid Japanese competition....coz they have the largest Japanese population outside of Japan!

Ahaha in Brazils case.....they DID migrate there en masse!

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The only book I know of is Quick & Easy Small Cakes by Kazuko Kawachi, translated by Yukiko Moriyama (Joie Inc., Tokyo, 1983 - my copy is a 1994 reprint - ISBN #4-915249-67-0).

Amazon lists it as being out-of-print and has no further information.

This presents recipes for individual serving-size cakes. Some are baked individually, such as tartlets, cream puff swans, while others are baked as a larger cake and cut into individual portions, such as a genoise base cut into circles and the molds (biscuit cutters or empty tin cans) filled with mousse before unmolding. They're not the fancy creations of the current crop of Japanese pastry chefs, but rather pretty cakes that a moderately accomplished home baker can replicate, with step-by-step photo instructions.


SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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I know about the site (cake chef), and the translation is not clear enough. i'm very impreesed with the japanese work, they are creative people especialy when they started to use foreign recipes with there local ingredients (example: tiramisu with green tea or green tea cheesecake with black sesame seeds).

I think i should study japanese.

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Altaf, I was at kinokuniya today looking for another book and I came across Hidemi Sugino's The Dessert Book. Its in English/Japanese and has some cool looking recipes. Didn't know it was dual language. He segregates the recipes by citrus fruit, vegetables (Pumpkin gnocci with something dessert) and other sections. There are not as many recipes as a western book coz they have step by step pictures of how to make the recipes.

Check it out here http://www.amazon.co.jp/exec/obidos/ASIN/4...7020753-0808307

Just go to your nearest Kinokuniya or Japanese bookstore and quote the ISBN number to order it. This is so far the only one I've come across.......but will report more when found.

Hironobu Tsujiguchi has written several good books too about pastries but unfortunately, its all in Japanese. Bought his Wagashi book today.

Hope this helps!

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