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The Generic Whisk(e)y Topic


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For reasons that I don't understand -- and Denis Joyal wasn't there to ask -- for the first time I've ever been there, a bottle of McCarthy’s Oregon Single Malt Pot Distilled Whiskey showed up on the shelf of Joyal's Liquors, the best place to get whisk(e)y in my little state. I am a fan of the Clear Creek stuff, but I'd never heard of this. It's an Oregon whiskey distilled in a distinctly Scottish style, which Islay peat, Highland cream, and some wacky funk that's hard to pin down. One bottle, mind you, one. If you see one, go grab it; if you see more than one, send the others to me.

Chris Amirault

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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  • 1 month later...

Just grabbed a bottle of the 2009 McCarthy's Oregon Single Malt Whiskey (at Town Wine & Spirits in E Prov, RI/SE MA residents), and it's even better than the first bottle I got (not sure of vintage). This stuff is remarkable.

Chris Amirault

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Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

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  • 2 years later...
  • 1 year later...

Hmmm, anyone tried Tyrconnel single malt Irish whiskey? I came across a bottle and thought I'd try it and expand my whisk(e)y horizons a bit. I have very limited experience with Irish whiskey - whisky wise I have mostly drunk bourbon and rye so far.

 

But this one tasted pretty odd to me. Upon opening I noticed a strong apple/sour/ and perhaps an "off" note and to me the taste followed suit. I tried it neat, in an old fashioned and in a Weeski cocktail and it just tastes a bit "off" to me. I made a Weeski with Jameson's to compare, and was very smooth. I must say I preferred the latter. Just wondering if i haven't aquired a taste for the Tyrconnel yet or if it is indeed a bit odd?

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Hmmm, anyone tried Tyrconnel single malt Irish whiskey? I came across a bottle and thought I'd try it and expand my whisk(e)y horizons a bit. I have very limited experience with Irish whiskey - whisky wise I have mostly drunk bourbon and rye so far.

 

But this one tasted pretty odd to me. Upon opening I noticed a strong apple/sour/ and perhaps an "off" note and to me the taste followed suit. I tried it neat, in an old fashioned and in a Weeski cocktail and it just tastes a bit "off" to me. I made a Weeski with Jameson's to compare, and was very smooth. I must say I preferred the latter. Just wondering if i haven't aquired a taste for the Tyrconnel yet or if it is indeed a bit odd?

 

Tyrconnell was an older brand name from a now closed distillery that was resurrected by Cooley as a single malt which is now owned by Beam Suntory (and renamed the Kilbeggan distillery by Beam Suntory) and as far as I know is still being produced. Cooley was unusual for distilling only two times (more like scotch) instead of the typical three times of the two other major distillers of Irish whiskey. I don't know that it ever carried an age statement and it isn't one of my favorites (although I do have a couple of AD Rattray releases of older barrel proof Cooley malt that I like).

 

There is supposed to be a 15yo version but I have never seen it. However there are three finished Tyrconnell's (port, sherry and my favorite, madeira) that I do like more than the regular single malt. Don't see those quite as much as I used to since the sale so not sure if they are still made. Like most basic Irish whiskey the NAS version tends toward the light side with some grain character and I agree that the regular single malt tends to have an unusual apple/pear fruit note that tends to stand out a bit.

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hello- Single Malt Whisky is one of my passions, but I know very little about them. About the only thing I know for sure is that I seem to prefer Lowland and Island (Islay in particular) varieties. Can anyone suggest bottles that I should try?

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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Have you explored any whisky from Cambeltown? Springbank is one to try

 

This. This. This. This. Sorry but, ja, Springbank. I've only had a small number of the large range but heartily recommend the cask-strength, twelve-year-old expression. I've also had a Scotch Malt Whisky Society bottling--'Cowboy's Delight' at, I think, fifteen years of age--that was just incredible. They also put out whisky under the name Longrow. I tasted the entry-level Longrow recently and was very impressed. I've seen a sampler pack that bundles together the entry-level expressions of Longrow, Springbank and Hazelburn. If you can find that, it might be worthwhile. I've never had Hazelburn of any age but I'd happily blind buy a bottle based purely on my fondness for the Springbank expressions I've tried.

 

Islay-wise, I assume you've ticked off most of the big names: Laphroaig (in its ten-year-old and 'quarter cask' variants, at least), Lagavulin (sixteen-year-old--haven't tried the younger expression yet) and Ardbeg. I like Ardbeg Uigeadail. The ten-year-old standard is good, too. Can't say I've tried many of the special bottlings. I really, really, really like Bruichladdich's work. The ten-year-old 'Laddie' is nice. I'm fond, too, of the very young 'Octomore'. At least the one I have (a limited run every year or so). I wasn't blown away by the Coal Ila I've tried but it was just an independent bottling, slightly younger than Coal Ila's own brand entry-level offering. I can tell you that exist but cannot recommend them based on a lack of experience. Same applies to Bowmore. I wasn't impressed by some well-aged Bunnahabhain I tried. Just didn't do it for me, much to the horror of the gentleman trying to sell me a (ridiculously well-priced) bottle. Still on the Islands (but beyond Islay), I like Talisker's Distiller's Bullshit Edition. I used to love the ten-year-old standard but have heard its gone down hill. If you can pick up a bottling from a few years ago, though--a dusty bottle on a shelf in some crappy little store--go right ahead.

 

Lowlands ... hmm ... Auchentoshan's Valinch is okay. I've had the bottle on the go for a while now and doubt I'll buy another, though, unless I happen to stumble across a reasonably-priced Triple Wood. I know I've seen a sampler pack that contains minis of three or four of their expressions, including the classic, Valinch and the Triple Wood. Rather than blindly purchasing a 700mL bottle, that might be the way to go. Particularly if, like me, you're happy to try lots of stuff. Ralfy (ralfystuff/YouTube) rates Bladnoch very highly but I've yet to remember the name of this 'still when I've been at a whisky bar or anywhere else likely to serve it. Oh well. Glenkinchie's entry-level offering didn't hugely impress me.

 

Other malts from here and there? 

 

Aberlour a'Bunadh is good. At least the two or three batches I've sampled were good. Different, tho'. haresfur and I once did a side-by-side comparison of the bottle he owned (batch 30something) and the bottle I owned (28?) and found them clearly distinct. Both nice.

 

Glenlivet's entry-level bottling doesn't do much for me but their Nadurra (a short-run special? a new permanent fixture? no idea) is pleasant. 

 

Glenfarclas' aged variants--the 15, 21 and 25--are nice. Not a fan of 8 or 105. Want, badly, to try the 30 and 40. For whisky that's older than me--just--the 30 isn't crazy expensive. So far as old whiskies go.

 

One cheapie worth snapping up if you see it is Dalwhinnie. It's hard not to like the standard bottling. Granted, I say 'standard' but I don't even know if there are other bottlings. Most Dalwhinnie winds up in blends.

 

I might also steer you in the direction of the Scotch Malt Whisky Society bottlings. Yeah, membership is a bit expensive (at least if you're only buying a bottle or two and live, like me, a helluva long way away from their members-only bars) but you'll find the odd bar that sells their whiskies by the glass to the masses. Melbourne's Whisky and Alement, for instance, sells all of the current malts--plus a few from earlier in the year--by the glass. It's a bit of a trap, though. I've not had a bad one yet. And then, when I go to the SMWS site and see that the 'nice glass of whisky' was poured from a $400 bottle, I'm glad it was nice. These malts offer something I've yet to find in even very good whiskies elsewhere. I mean, going to any of Springbank's standard offerings--as lovely as they are--is a helluva step down after your introduction to the 'still was a SMWS bottling.

Chris Taylor

Host, eG Forums - ctaylor@egstaff.org

 

I've never met an animal I didn't enjoy with salt and pepper.

Melbourne
Harare, Victoria Falls and some places in between

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Langavulin is in fact one of my most favorite SMSW.

Edited by Naftal (log)

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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Have you explored any whisky from Cambeltown? Springbank is one to try

 

 

This. This. This. This. Sorry but, ja, Springbank. I've only had a small number of the large range but heartily recommend the cask-strength, twelve-year-old expression. I've also had a Scotch Malt Whisky Society bottling--'Cowboy's Delight' at, I think, fifteen years of age--that was just incredible. They also put out whisky under the name Longrow. I tasted the entry-level Longrow recently and was very impressed. I've seen a sampler pack that bundles together the entry-level expressions of Longrow, Springbank and Hazelburn. If you can find that, it might be worthwhile. I've never had Hazelburn of any age but I'd happily blind buy a bottle based purely on my fondness for the Springbank expressions I've tried.

 

Islay-wise, I assume you've ticked off most of the big names: Laphroaig (in its ten-year-old and 'quarter cask' variants, at least), Lagavulin (sixteen-year-old--haven't tried the younger expression yet) and Ardbeg. I like Ardbeg Uigeadail. The ten-year-old standard is good, too. Can't say I've tried many of the special bottlings. I really, really, really like Bruichladdich's work. The ten-year-old 'Laddie' is nice. I'm fond, too, of the very young 'Octomore'. At least the one I have (a limited run every year or so). I wasn't blown away by the Coal Ila I've tried but it was just an independent bottling, slightly younger than Coal Ila's own brand entry-level offering. I can tell you that exist but cannot recommend them based on a lack of experience. Same applies to Bowmore. I wasn't impressed by some well-aged Bunnahabhain I tried. Just didn't do it for me, much to the horror of the gentleman trying to sell me a (ridiculously well-priced) bottle. Still on the Islands (but beyond Islay), I like Talisker's Distiller's Bullshit Edition. I used to love the ten-year-old standard but have heard its gone down hill. If you can pick up a bottling from a few years ago, though--a dusty bottle on a shelf in some crappy little store--go right ahead.

 

Lowlands ... hmm ... Auchentoshan's Valinch is okay. I've had the bottle on the go for a while now and doubt I'll buy another, though, unless I happen to stumble across a reasonably-priced Triple Wood. I know I've seen a sampler pack that contains minis of three or four of their expressions, including the classic, Valinch and the Triple Wood. Rather than blindly purchasing a 700mL bottle, that might be the way to go. Particularly if, like me, you're happy to try lots of stuff. Ralfy (ralfystuff/YouTube) rates Bladnoch very highly but I've yet to remember the name of this 'still when I've been at a whisky bar or anywhere else likely to serve it. Oh well. Glenkinchie's entry-level offering didn't hugely impress me.

 

Other malts from here and there? 

 

Aberlour a'Bunadh is good. At least the two or three batches I've sampled were good. Different, tho'. haresfur and I once did a side-by-side comparison of the bottle he owned (batch 30something) and the bottle I owned (28?) and found them clearly distinct. Both nice.

 

Glenlivet's entry-level bottling doesn't do much for me but their Nadurra (a short-run special? a new permanent fixture? no idea) is pleasant. 

 

Glenfarclas' aged variants--the 15, 21 and 25--are nice. Not a fan of 8 or 105. Want, badly, to try the 30 and 40. For whisky that's older than me--just--the 30 isn't crazy expensive. So far as old whiskies go.

 

One cheapie worth snapping up if you see it is Dalwhinnie. It's hard not to like the standard bottling. Granted, I say 'standard' but I don't even know if there are other bottlings. Most Dalwhinnie winds up in blends.

 

I might also steer you in the direction of the Scotch Malt Whisky Society bottlings. Yeah, membership is a bit expensive (at least if you're only buying a bottle or two and live, like me, a helluva long way away from their members-only bars) but you'll find the odd bar that sells their whiskies by the glass to the masses. Melbourne's Whisky and Alement, for instance, sells all of the current malts--plus a few from earlier in the year--by the glass. It's a bit of a trap, though. I've not had a bad one yet. And then, when I go to the SMWS site and see that the 'nice glass of whisky' was poured from a $400 bottle, I'm glad it was nice. These malts offer something I've yet to find in even very good whiskies elsewhere. I mean, going to any of Springbank's standard offerings--as lovely as they are--is a helluva step down after your introduction to the 'still was a SMWS bottling.

Thanks for the suggestions!

"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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Hello- Single Malt Whisky is one of my passions, but I know very little about them. About the only thing I know for sure is that I seem to prefer Lowland and Island (Islay in particular) varieties. Can anyone suggest bottles that I should try?

 

 

An interesting contrast. Lowland whisky, like Bladnoch, tends to be a bit lighter and more delicate while Islay whisky is generally anything but!

 

In any case it looks like Chris and others have you pretty well covered but I certainly second the Springbank/Longrow suggestion. Not exactly Islay or Lowland but practically the best of both worlds.

If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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