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Baitan (Paitan) Soup


Hiroyuki
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Jason Perlow recently started this thread in the Japan Forum.

According to this webpage, tonkotsu soup is similiar to baitan (白湯).

The tonkotsu flavor is similar to the Chinese baitan (白湯), and is a thick broth taken from boiling crushed pork bones for hours.

Can anyone tell us how to make baitan (paitan)?

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The tonkotsu flavor is similar to the Chinese baitan (白湯), and is a thick broth taken from boiling crushed pork bones for hours.

Can anyone tell us how to make baitan (paitan)?

Just reading the descriptions from the webpage... We typically make pork bone soup using a "double boiling" (or "twice boiling") method, as illustrated in this pictorial recipe:

Pork Butt Bone Soup with Kabocha (南瓜豬骨湯)

Since you just want the soup, skip all the other ingredients. (But in order for the soup to taste good, we must use some other ingredients to cook with the pork bones.)

W.K. Leung ("Ah Leung") aka "hzrt8w"
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The tonkotsu flavor is similar to the Chinese baitan (白湯), and is a thick broth taken from boiling crushed pork bones for hours.

Can anyone tell us how to make baitan (paitan)?

Just reading the descriptions from the webpage... We typically make pork bone soup using a "double boiling" (or "twice boiling") method, as illustrated in this pictorial recipe:

Pork Butt Bone Soup with Kabocha (南瓜豬骨湯)

Since you just want the soup, skip all the other ingredients. (But in order for the soup to taste good, we must use some other ingredients to cook with the pork bones.)

Thank you for the link, jzrt9w. Quite educational.

Double boiling! Yes, that's exactly what they do to make tonkotsu soup. I didn't know there was such a 'technical term' for the step. Thank God this forum has a specialist!

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The traditional method preparing the soup base in Hong Kong requires using the "Pork Neck and Back Bones" for the base.

This is generally the least expensive bones at the markets, often having some meat trimmings left on the bones.

The bones are banged or broken with the flat side of a butcher chopper to expose the cartilage and marrow that important for the richness and character of the soup.

It is always done by the "Double Boiling Method" then allowed to simmer until it clarifies and at that point sliced ginger, garlic cloves and dark soy are added to enhance the taste and provide color continuing to simmer.

The broth is strained and allowed to cool, if placed under refrigeration it turns into a solid jelly base,

This broth is very popular when made into a Rice Gruel (Congee) served late at night by Street Hawkers or in Tai Pai Tungs where side ingredients can be added such as Salted Pork Julliane, Salt Eggs, Raw Eggs, Pickled Vegetables and whatever else is available. This is sold from after midnight thru late breakfast.

Irwin

I don't say that I do. But don't let it get around that I don't.

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simmer -> paitan soup

rolling boil -> tonkotsu soup

The name for the rich, creamy stock resulting from hours of boiling of pork bones is referring to as “milk soup” (奶湯) in Northern Chinese cuisine.

In other region, the term Baitan (白湯) is also used instead of "milk soup”(奶湯).

In classic Shandong cuisine, two different types of soup stocks are used. The “Clear Soup”(清湯) is made by simmering stock bones on low heat and the “milk soup”(奶湯) is made by boiling bones in higher heat to extract the rich creamy flavor from the bones.

The Southern Chinese prefer their stock clear for lighter, subtler taste.

In the North, maybe because the cold weather, people like to use the richer, bolder soup stock for their noodle.

Edited by pcbilly (log)
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