Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Sign in to follow this  
philadining

Best Mexican in Philly

Recommended Posts

Can anyone tell me what that white liquid is in the jet-spray machine near the kitchen? It looks like the fermented pineapple juice I've had in another tacqueria.

Methinks that would the horchata agua fresca.


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think I'm officially addicted.

I was wandering the Italian Market over the weekend and was irresistibly drawn into Los Taquitos de Puebla. A quick order of Tacos al Pastor, amazingly delicious as usual, and I was on my way, safe from making irresponsible hunger-induced purchases along 9th street. (or so I thought - somehow I still managed to spend obscene amounts of money in Claudios...)

Three Tacos al Pastor from this place is now my favorite $5 meal in the city.


"Philadelphia’s premier soup dumpling blogger" - Foobooz

philadining.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can anyone tell me what that white liquid is in the jet-spray machine near the kitchen? It looks like the fermented pineapple juice I've had in another tacqueria.

Methinks that would the horchata agua fresca.

It is, and it's pretty good. My girlfriend and I plowed through 4 cups of it :laugh: I dunno where else you can get horchata around here. It's a rice based drink that I liken to drinking a thinner blended rice pudding.

The alambres are quite tasty as well. This place very much reminded me of Mexico, except some of the things I'm used to being included with your meal in Mexico (a little bowl of soup, grilled green onions) didn't come with the meals. Tacos al pastor were of course sublime.

That being said, the frijoles charros didn't really do it for me. It turned out to be a beef and bean soup that was ok, but nothing amazing. We should have spent the $5 on more al pastor :wink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've seen horchata at Mexico Lindo in Camden, at Michoacana in Norristown (where it's very good!) and also at Taqueria la Veracruzana on Washington Ave. It's around. Sometimes it might not be on display like it is a la Puebla.

It definitely tastes like drinkable rice pudding! :wub:


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, I really like the frijoles charros -- I just had this again on Saturday. But I saw someone else order it before I ordered it the first time, so I knew it would be a soup. (If I had just ordered it based on the menu description, I think I would've imagined it to be a bit like a Mexican cassoulet or a rice & beans dish.)

Buckethead, I raved about the tepeche (fermented pineapple juice) at la Puebla in an earlier post -- I can confirm that it is pineapple-colored. The white drink, as noted previously, is the horchata.

Also, Plaza Garibaldi has the superior queso fundido con chorizo in these parts, IMO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Also, Plaza Garibaldi has the superior queso fundido con chorizo in these parts, IMO.

Although I've certainly not tried this dish everywhere, I'd have to concur.

It's kinda greasy, but that's part of the charm... :wub:


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i never liked garibaldi's fundido, the couple of times i had it. not enough melty cheese, too much other stuff.

but that's neither here nor there. this is the information i have to impart tonight:

taqueria la veracruzana delivers, and if you're near this part of town (somewhere south of south street, pretty much river to river), the food comes nearly as quickly as if you were ordering it in the restaurant. i mean, they said 20-35 minutes, and it was here in about 25 minutes. i mean, that's ridiculously fast. and it's still good, too--i know the al pastor at the other place is better, and i know garibaldi's is more full-service, and whatnot, but seriously the amount of tasty food we got delivered in 25 minutes for $15 was ridiculous. aaaaaaw yeah

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Happy one year anniversary (last Monday) to Taqueria Taquitos de Puebla! They've re-printed their menus acknowledging the anniversary, and posted a list of specials on the door. From what the owner said, though specials are not necessarily specials so much as they are highlighted menu items. (That may be a little special, depending on what they feel like doing that night.) Anyway, we decided to branch out and try some new things, as we frequent the the place for tacos or cemita al pastor or longaniza tacos.

Last night I had the arrachara tacos, which were very tender steak (I would've said marinated flank, except that there was no obvious marinade flavor?) No gristle, trimmed lean, and lots of it. To my delight, it was served with a pile of grilled cactus and sauteed onions, with avocado, tomatoes, and some queso fresco on the side. Thumbs up.

My SO had the tacos with chuleta ahumado (smoked pork chop.) Excellent, smoky cubes of meat. I shared my copious accompaniments, since his tacos didn't come with all of that. Also thumbs up.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Popping in from the Vancouver BC board to let you all know how much I wish I lived in Philly. The reason: Taqueria Taquitos de Puebla. This is the first time I've ever seen tacos al pastor done the way I long for from days past in coastal towns of Mexico: upright "gyros style" cooking method with pineapple on top and sliced onto the meat, just raw onions and cilantro, no sauce but what you add yourself from the several bowls on offer and a squeeze of lime. A side order of the chubby grilled spring onions, a giant bottle of Coke or beer of your choice and it's all over but the shouting. I looked for this setup in San Francisco both times I visited (2003 and 2 weeks ago) to no avail and had about decided no one made 'em that way outside Puerto Vallarta and environs. Thanks for sharing your descriptions and photos -- I will continue to seek my holy grail of sheperd's tacos :wub:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

grayelf:

Should you ever find a reason (besides the tacos) to find yourself in Philly, I'm certain any number of us would be happy to accompany you on the quest for the Al Pastor tacos. Heck, I'm sure we could arrange a proper tour for you of the various taquerias and some proper libations to boot.

Let us know when you're coming... :smile:


Katie M. Loeb
Booze Muse, Spiritual Advisor

Author: Shake, Stir, Pour:Fresh Homegrown Cocktails

Cheers!
Bartendrix,Intoxicologist, Beverage Consultant, Philadelphia, PA
Captain Liberty of the Good Varietals, Aphrodite of Alcohol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
grayelf:

Should you ever find a reason (besides the tacos) to find yourself in Philly, I'm certain any number of us would be happy to accompany you on the quest for the Al Pastor tacos.  Heck, I'm sure we could arrange a proper tour for you of the various taquerias and some proper libations to boot.

Let us know when you're coming... :smile:

That's right neighbourly of you. Beware, I may just take you up on it. And of course, should you find yourself in Vancouver and looking for somewhere off the beaten track to snack, just PM me!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there are a few new mexican shops opening up here on south 9th. one is a bakery and there's at least one new restaurant as well. i'll post back when i check them out. it's just so hard to not go to Taquitos de Puebla...


--

matt o'hara

finding philly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
there are a few new mexican shops opening up here on south 9th.  one is a bakery and there's at least one new restaurant as well.  i'll post back when i check them out.  it's just so hard to not go to Taquitos de Puebla...

I restrained myself and hit up Moctezuma on Tuesday, on 9th between Ellsworth and Washington. They opened up about a month and a half ago.

My friend and I split a chicken breast special (first on the list, with a cheesy topping of what I think were nopalitos) and the lamb flautas. Both were excellent, and we were pleasantly surprised by the succulence of the chicken. Their beans were good, but the rice with the chicken was a little wet/overcooked for my taste. The tortilla chips came with two standard salsas: guajillo chilli and salsa verde. The guajillo chilli salsa was great: a perfect blend of earthiness and spiciness, much better than Veracruzana's. The salsa verde was spicy but not as flavorful as it could have been. My friend's horchata tasted homemade, less chemical than at Veracruzana. The nutmeg on top was a nice touch, too. Service was friendly; the manager spoke English excellently and was very solicitous.

Having not tried the tacos, I can't really compare with Taquitos de Puebla. Guess I've got to go back... :laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You guys are killing me! But I can't stop reading as the jealousy mounts...

there are a few new mexican shops opening up here on south 9th.  one is a bakery and there's at least one new restaurant as well.  i'll post back when i check them out.  it's just so hard to not go to Taquitos de Puebla...

I restrained myself and hit up Moctezuma on Tuesday, on 9th between Ellsworth and Washington. They opened up about a month and a half ago.

My friend and I split a chicken breast special (first on the list, with a cheesy topping of what I think were nopalitos) and the lamb flautas. Both were excellent, and we were pleasantly surprised by the succulence of the chicken. Their beans were good, but the rice with the chicken was a little wet/overcooked for my taste. The tortilla chips came with two standard salsas: guajillo chilli and salsa verde. The guajillo chilli salsa was great: a perfect blend of earthiness and spiciness, much better than Veracruzana's. The salsa verde was spicy but not as flavorful as it could have been. My friend's horchata tasted homemade, less chemical than at Veracruzana. The nutmeg on top was a nice touch, too. Service was friendly; the manager spoke English excellently and was very solicitous.

Having not tried the tacos, I can't really compare with Taquitos de Puebla. Guess I've got to go back... :laugh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tamarindo's in Blue Bell and the nearly orgasmic Paloma in the Northeast. love, love, love these two places!


Leslie Crowell

it will all be fine in the end. if it isn't fine, it isn't the end.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i would just like to point out one thing: veracruzana is by no means the best in philly, although they were one of the first taquerias down there a few years ago.

but the reason i'm posting is this: tonight we ordered enough food to feed an army for like $25. we ordered at 6, and the doorbell rang at 6:15.

seriously 15 minutes. i know i've mentioned before how fast they are, but i think that's a new record. i defy anyone to find any other restaurant that can deliver dinner that fast. i bet you the chinese place that's literally around the corner from us couldn't do it that fast.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's pretty clear that Veracruzana has hired psychics to drive around in trucks, waiting for you to get hungry so that they can bring you food.

They could probably bring the food even before you called; but that would shatter your precious illusion of free will. And who would want that? Nobody, that's who.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"who's that at the door? i didn't want tacos de chiles rellenos.... OR DID I..."

the guy was on a bike, too. it takes nearly 10 minutes to bike to our house from there. sometimes it takes 10+ minutes to get your tacos when you're at TLV -- i think the reason is they're too busy putting together my order. between them and ridiculously cheery szechuan tasty house delivery guy, i swear i'm never leaving the house again.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
"who's that at the door?  i didn't want tacos de chiles rellenos.... OR DID I..."

the guy was on a bike, too.  it takes nearly 10 minutes to bike to our house from there. sometimes it takes 10+ minutes to get your tacos when you're at TLV -- i think the reason is they're too busy putting together my order.  between them and ridiculously cheery szechuan tasty house delivery guy, i swear i'm never leaving the house again.

Sometimes I order from Szechuan Tasty House, not because I'm hungry, but just because I wanna see my buddy with the moped. That guy is the man.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been following this thread for some time since I grew up in the suburbs of Philadelphia and then lived in the city for more than 10 years before moving to France. When I lived in Philadelphia, good Mexican just didn’t exist (except for Tequilas).

And so the day after I landed I knew what my first meal would be. I hopped on the R5 from the burbs and made my way down 9th street (with a quick stop at the Terminal, one of my favorite places on earth, for a Peking duck roll to hold me over) for a very late lunch at La Peubla. It’s amazing how much things have changed since I lived at 10th and Christian more than ten years ago. I loved wandering down 9th street, and would strongly recommend a trip to this unique part of Philadelphia to anyone visiting. The tacos al pastor were, as depicted here, delicious, and worth the trip. I would definitely like to eat more Mexican before heading home to Paris since this is just something I can not get and will return to La Peubla, unless someone has another recommendation in the area.


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have been following this thread for some time since I grew up in the suburbs of Philadelphia and then lived in the city for more than 10 years before moving to France.  When I lived in Philadelphia,  good Mexican just didn’t exist (except for Tequilas).   

And so the day after I landed I knew what my first meal would be.  I hopped on the R5 from the burbs and made my way down 9th street (with a quick stop at the Terminal, one of my favorite places on earth, for a Peking duck roll to hold me over) for a very late lunch at La Peubla. It’s amazing how much things have changed since I lived at 10th and Christian more than ten years ago.  I loved wandering down 9th street, and would strongly recommend a trip to this unique part of Philadelphia to anyone visiting.  The tacos al pastor were, as depicted here, delicious, and worth the trip.  I would definitely like to eat more Mexican before heading home to Paris since this is just something I can not get and will return to La Peubla, unless someone has another recommendation in the area.

Los Taquitos de Puebla is definitely my favorite tacqueria in the city, but if you'd like to try another, Tacqueria Veracruzana is nearby, on Washington just west of 9th (I think), but nothing there is quite as good as the tacos al pastor at Puebla. There's also Las Bugambilias, which is run by the old chef at Tequila's, and of course Jose Garces' new place, Distrito, in University City.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey DAGordon, I believe Veracruzana is now on the GI list ?

That makes the Taco al pastor at Taco Riendo the winner by two horse lengths no ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to deviate slightly from my shameless shilling for the goat tacos at Cantina Los Caballitos and Cantina Dos Segundos, to shamelessly shill for the Tacos al Pastor at Cantina Dos Segundos.

They have the traditional vertical spit, like Taquitos de Puebla has, but Dos uses a more aggressive marinade/sauce. It's really freaking good.

The only problem is trying to resist the goat tacos. Unless you just get both.


"Philadelphia’s premier soup dumpling blogger" - Foobooz

philadining.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you both for the suggestions. I would love to try them all but I don't have enough days left and this is not a very fun trip unfortunately (family illness) and doesn't give me too much time to go out. However, I don't make it to the States too often and Mexican is one thing they do really badly in France, so I couldn't miss it. :smile:


www.parisnotebook.wordpress.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey, Felice! Sorry you are in town under not good circumstances...

My vote is Taco Rienda in NoLib. Real, not tex-mex.

(Although I too, like Dos Segundos!)

Oh, and if you are here on Sunday, don't miss the Headhouse Farmer's Market starting at 10:00 a.m. It's the closest to the marches in France...although, last Sunday there weren't as many stalls since it was getting cold. And, tomorrow (Tues), there's a small one at South & Passyunk starting at 3 or 4 p.m., can't remember.

Fair Food in Reading Terminal has local dried blueberries and cranberries, which is something my friends in France really appreciate me taking them back.


Philly Francophiles

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Similar Content

    • By Henga
      Hi there! I am looking for a good Mexican cookbook. Any recommendations? Thanks in advance.
    • By newchef
      I'm trying to make a Roasted Poblano and Black Bean Enchilada recipe and I don't know if the tomatillo cream sauce will be freezer-friendly.     Basically I process the following ingredients in a food processor to make the cream sauce.  I plan on freezing the sauce in ice-cube trays for individual servings.  The sauce will then be thawed and spread on a baking dish and also used to top the enchiladas and cook in a 400 degree oven.   Thanks!   INGREDIENTS:   -26 ounces canned tomatillos, drained -1 onion -1/2 cup cilantro leaves -1/3 cup vegetable broth -1/4 cup heavy cream -1 tbsp vegetable oil -3 garlic cloves -1 tbsp lime juice -1 tsp sugar -1 tsp salt
    • By David Ross
      Ah, the avocado! For many of us, this humble little fruit inspires only one dish. Yet the avocado has a culinary history that is deeper than we may understand.
       
      The avocado (Persea Americana) is a tree thought to have originated in South Central Mexico.  It’s a member of the flowering plant family Lauraceae.  The fruit of the plant - yes, it's a fruit and not a vegetable - is also called avocado.
       
      Avocados grow in tropical and warm climates throughout the world.  The season in California typically runs from February through September, but avocados from Mexico are now available year-round.
       
      The avocado has a higher fat content than other fruits, and as such serves as an important staple in the diet of consumers who are seeking other sources of protein than meats and fatty foods.  Avocado oil has found a new customer base due to its flavor in dressings and sauces and the high smoke point is favorable when sautéing meat and seafood. 
       
      In recent years, due in part to catchy television commercials and the influence of Pinterest, the avocado has seen a resurgence in popularity with home cooks and professionals.  Walk into your local casual spot and the menu will undoubtedly have some derivation of avocado toast, typically topped with bacon.  Avocados have found a rightful place back on fine dining menus, but unfortunately all too often over-worked dishes with too many ingredients and garnishes erase the pure taste and silky texture of an avocado. 
       
      When I think of an avocado it’s the Hass variety.  However, a friend who lives in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, can buy Choquette, Hall and Lulu avocados in the local markets.  This link provides good information about the different varieties of avocados, when they’re in season and the differences in taste and texture. https://www.foodrepublic.com/2012/10/18/know-your-avocado-varieties-and-when-theyre-in-season/
       
      I for one must challenge myself to start eating and cooking more avocados.  I think my recipe for guacamole served with chicharrones is superb, and the cobb salad with large chunks of ripe avocado is delicious, but as a close friend recently said, “one person’s ‘not especially new’ is another’s “eureka moment.” Well said and as history tells us, we’ll find plenty of eureka moments as we discuss and share our tales and dishes of avocado during eG Cook-Off #81: The Avocado.
       
      Fun fact: The name avocado derives from the Nahuatl word “ahuacatl,” which was also slang for “testicle.”
      See the complete eG Cook-Off Index here https://forums.egullet.org/topic/143994-egullet-recipe-cook-off-index/
    • By Darienne
      Chile Rellenos.  Every Mexican or Mexican type restaurant we've ever been in almost, I've chosen Chile Rellenos.   I keep thinking I'll pick something different...and then I don't.  I've made them.  Once.  So much trouble.  And deep fat frying.  And of course in the Far Frozen North where we live, we've been able to get Poblanos (that's it) for only about five years now.  
       
      Imagine my delight, the appeal to my very lazy side, to discover the following recipe just a few days ago: https://www.homesicktexan.com/2018/09/chile-relleno-casserole-el-paso-style.html  .  And yesterday I made them and served them to guests with Mexican rice and black beans.  Died and gone to heaven.
       
      OK.  Truth time.  I used Poblanos and  I did not roast them to remove the skins.  In an electric oven, it's not a nice job.  And besides the skins have never bothered me or Ed at all.  But I did roast the Poblanos in the oven.  And then I used commercial salsa because we had one we liked.  (Did I say that I can be lazy sometimes?)  And I used Pepper Jack cheese.  Jack cheese is not always available in the small Ontario city we live outside of and pepper jack is even less common.  Buy it when you see it.  I defrosted some frozen guacamole I had in the freezer.  But by heavens the casserole was delicious and now it's on our menu permanently.
       
      So shoot me.  But I thought I'd share my joy anyway. 
    • By jackie40503
      I lived in Phoenix AZ a total of 24 years and during that time I found what the local restaurants call a Green Chili Burro. I have also lived and worked in 48 states and the only ones who have them is either in Arizona, Western New Mexico or Southern California. I am now retired in Northwest Washington State. I have searched the internet for recipes and have found that none of them taste the same. I have also written to many Mexican restaurants and either did not receive a reply or was told that they could not give out the recipe. I am now going around to blogs/forums dealing with Mexican foods hoping that someone would have the actual recipe from one of the restaurants. Its not like I am going trying to compete with them since I live along way from those areas and only wish to serve it in my own household.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...