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Patisseries in Paris

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An amazing lemon tart. Something I almost always find cloying, this was incredibly light, with a filling that turned to liquid the instant it entered your mouth.

gallery_17945_2647_71816.jpg

Any idea what made it different? And what's the green/herb there?

the 'green herb' is actually lime zest.


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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An amazing lemon tart. Something I almost always find cloying, this was incredibly light, with a filling that turned to liquid the instant it entered your mouth.

gallery_17945_2647_71816.jpg

Any idea what made it different? And what's the green/herb there?

the 'green herb' is actually lime zest.

Sheez, I should have guessed. And that would explain a lot.

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Hello!

Visiting paris next month. Anyone know which patisseries are the best in town? Thanks :)


website: www.cookscook.co.uk

email: sophie@cookscook.co.uk

twitter: cookscookuk instagram: cookscookuk

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Anyplace where the croissants are a proper "French Brown" :smile: 

 

David Lebovitz and Paris by Mouth are two good resources, Paris by Mouth kindly organizes by zip code

 

When I was there a few months ago, my focus was more on chocolate shops, of which I'd say Pierre Herme, Patrick Roger, and Jacques Genin were my favorites.  For pastry, L'Eclair du Genie and Des Gateaux et du Pain are worthy stops. 

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On my "best of" list, Jacques Genin ranks pretty damn close to the top.  His shop in the north Marais is mostly chocolates and fruit jellies, but he offers a select few pastries each day.  His Paris-Brest is absolutely fantastic...see below, enjoyed back in April:

10291846_10202147554391593_5517481823109

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Wow! Thank you guys. This information is very useful. Jacques Genin looks incredible, I'll definitely give that a try and let you know how I get on.

 

Fantastic, will give all of these resources a read :)

 

Cheers


website: www.cookscook.co.uk

email: sophie@cookscook.co.uk

twitter: cookscookuk instagram: cookscookuk

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For something a little bit unusual try Sadaharu Aoki ... it is brilliant!

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Thanks Duvel, this looks really interesting. I love japanese desserts, so I'm definitely going to try this one out! :)


website: www.cookscook.co.uk

email: sophie@cookscook.co.uk

twitter: cookscookuk instagram: cookscookuk

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I would add La Boulangerie par Veronique Mauclerc if you want some viennoiserie cooked in a wood fired oven.

Sugared and Spiced is a great blog where you can find tons of reviews about Paris.

 

 

 

Teo

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Teo

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David Lebovitz has a Paris pastry app that provides reviews, photos, maps, etc. for more than 370 patisseries, chocolate, and ice cream shops in Paris.   It’s searchable by category and location, so you can easily find a recommendation wherever you happen to be.

 

It also includes a list of his favorite patisseries and a glossary/dictionary of French baking terms and food items.

 

And an updated version was just released last week!  I bought it just for fun.

 

It’s available on iTunes. If you want to preview a sample before purchasing it, you can download the “lite” version for free.  https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/secrets-of-paris/id475338195

 

Have a great trip. Let us know of any fabulous pastry discoveries.

 



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David Lebovitz has a Paris pastry app that provides reviews, photos, maps, etc. for more than 370 patisseries, chocolate, and ice cream shops in Paris.   It’s searchable by category and location, so you can easily find a recommendation wherever you happen to be.

 

It also includes a list of his favorite patisseries and a glossary/dictionary of French baking terms and food items.

 

And an updated version was just released last week!  I bought it just for fun.

 

It’s available on iTunes. If you want to preview a sample before purchasing it, you can download the “lite” version for free.  https://itunes.apple.com/us/artist/secrets-of-paris/id475338195

 

Have a great trip. Let us know of any fabulous pastry discoveries.

 

Thanks Linda :) I've downloaded the app - looks great. I'll share with you all of my discoveries! :)


website: www.cookscook.co.uk

email: sophie@cookscook.co.uk

twitter: cookscookuk instagram: cookscookuk

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We had a pastry tour of Paris last year and if you go to Jacques Genin and do not have a millefeuille then you've committed a food crime! My memory of it was that it was simply perfect. It was freshly made to order, the pastry was so light, the texture of each leaf was so refined, buttery, salty and sandwiching chocolate or vanilla creme of amazing intensity. My knife quite literally fell through the layers clinking onto the plate like a sigh. 

DSCF5615.JPG

 

Sadaharu Aoki great opera cakes in the Japanese style.

DSCF5929.JPG

 

Carl Marletti for choux pastry and in particular eclairs.

DSCF5925.JPG

 

Pierre Herme of course for macarons but also the fantastic canelé.

DSCF6136.JPG

 

La Patisserie de Reves for spectacular displays and the Kouign Amann are awesome.

DSCF6064.JPG

 

Des Gataeu et Des Pains had perfect croissants.

DSCF6076.JPG

 

 

 

 

 

It was a good hioliday!

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Thanks everyone for the tips - Sadaharu Aoki was my favourite! The matcha eclair and tarte au citron were particularly amazing!! 


website: www.cookscook.co.uk

email: sophie@cookscook.co.uk

twitter: cookscookuk instagram: cookscookuk

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