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Chocolates with that showroom finish, 2004 - 2011


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i'm thinking of experimenting with colored cocoa butter. on the chef rubber site they have 4 different ones ( artisan, jewel, pearl and decor) i was wondering if they are all good or are there some better than others? they will be put into molds, like some on the site have done.

Luis

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i'm thinking of experimenting with colored cocoa butter. on the chef rubber site they have 4 different ones ( artisan, jewel, pearl and decor) i was wondering if they are all good or are there some better than others? they will be put into molds, like some on the site have done.

Luis

I have used the white one from the artisan collection and the one with the jewel ones ( I relly love the metallic finish ), the were great great consistency and they never stick to the mold like when I tryed to mix color and coca butter .

Vanessa

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i'm thinking of experimenting with colored cocoa butter. on the chef rubber site they have 4 different ones ( artisan, jewel, pearl and decor) i was wondering if they are all good or are there some better than others? they will be put into molds, like some on the site have done.

Luis

when i called chef rubber, they explained that the "decor" version wasn't classified as edible. because it uses decor powders. i think this is a technicality. they can explain it a little better. the artisan line is pretty matte. i bought four colors and don't love them as they are a bit boring. i think i will try the pearl color next time.

oh yes, someone upthread responded to my questions with an explanation that there is a difference in the size of the reflective material which makes the colors shiny...this is a difference with the jewel colors versus the pearl and decor.

definitely call them to clarify! i think i just confused myself more! :blink:

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yes, sounds very confusing. decor not edible huh. might stay away from that one. lol

i'm thinking of experimenting with colored cocoa butter. on the chef rubber site they have 4 different ones ( artisan, jewel, pearl and decor) i was wondering if they are all good or are there some better than others? they will be put into molds, like some on the site have done.

Luis

when i called chef rubber, they explained that the "decor" version wasn't classified as edible. because it uses decor powders. i think this is a technicality. they can explain it a little better. the artisan line is pretty matte. i bought four colors and don't love them as they are a bit boring. i think i will try the pearl color next time.

oh yes, someone upthread responded to my questions with an explanation that there is a difference in the size of the reflective material which makes the colors shiny...this is a difference with the jewel colors versus the pearl and decor.

definitely call them to clarify! i think i just confused myself more! :blink:

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I did some try with the colored cocoa butter and the aereograph.Now when I used the cocoa butter with added colors ( the artisan ones from rubber chef ) I didnt have to much trouble ( even thought like Wendy said the darn can freeze up often ) , but when I tryed to spray the colored cocoa butter ( already premixed also from rubber chef ) I used the white and the two metallic from the jewel collection ,I believe, the color really didnt came out , I tryed to reclean the tip many times and everytime i switched with the regular cocoa butter and color it worked .NOw can it be that the already premixed colored cocoa butter are too thick for the aerograph ,or the aereosol can isnt strong enough to push that kind of color out ?Maybe a compressor would work better?

Any one has any idea on the matter?

Thank you

Vanessa

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I did some try with the colored cocoa butter and the aereograph.Now when I used the cocoa butter with added colors ( the artisan ones from rubber chef ) I didnt have to much trouble ( even thought like Wendy said the darn can freeze up  often ) , but when I tryed to spray the colored cocoa butter ( already premixed also from rubber chef ) I used the white and the two metallic from the jewel collection ,I believe, the color really didnt came out , I tryed to reclean  the tip many times and everytime i switched with the regular cocoa butter and color it worked .NOw can it be that the already premixed colored cocoa butter are too thick for the aerograph ,or the aereosol can isnt strong enough to push that kind of color out ?Maybe a compressor would work better?

Any one has any idea on the matter?

Thank you

I haven't used the aerograph airbrush but I went to the site and it sounds like they make a very high quality airbrush which may not be meant for spraying dust particles through it, or for using a thicker medium like cocoa butter, for that matter.

I have 2 airbrushes, an airmaster and a badger, and I can tell you the airmaster is meant for very fine work as well and I cannot get lustre dusts to go through so I'd never attempt cocoa butter because it'd just clog for sure. The badger works great for spraying the cocoa butter because the sprayed medium never actually runs through the tip.

A badger will cost you about $25 in the US and is well worth it, plus I'm pretty sure you can't wreck it! (I've been pretty mean to mine and there's no way to clog it, really.) If I were you I'd save the expensive aerograph for other work and get a badger for chocolate work.

As for using the propellant cans.... first it's not really air in there so I'm not sure you want to be spraying that stuff on food items. Second, it's not very cost effective to use them....they're designed to be used in remote locations if I'm not mistaken. I think you should see if you can get a compressor.....just make sure it's a compressor designer for an airbrush bcause they run a lot quieter than the compressors you can get at the hardware store.

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I did some try with the colored cocoa butter and the aereograph.Now when I used the cocoa butter with added colors ( the artisan ones from rubber chef ) I didnt have to much trouble ( even thought like Wendy said the darn can freeze up  often ) , but when I tryed to spray the colored cocoa butter ( already premixed also from rubber chef ) I used the white and the two metallic from the jewel collection ,I believe, the color really didnt came out , I tryed to reclean  the tip many times and everytime i switched with the regular cocoa butter and color it worked .NOw can it be that the already premixed colored cocoa butter are too thick for the aerograph ,or the aereosol can isnt strong enough to push that kind of color out ?Maybe a compressor would work better?

Any one has any idea on the matter?

Thank you

I haven't used the aerograph airbrush but I went to the site and it sounds like they make a very high quality airbrush which may not be meant for spraying dust particles through it, or for using a thicker medium like cocoa butter, for that matter.

I have 2 airbrushes, an airmaster and a badger, and I can tell you the airmaster is meant for very fine work as well and I cannot get lustre dusts to go through so I'd never attempt cocoa butter because it'd just clog for sure. The badger works great for spraying the cocoa butter because the sprayed medium never actually runs through the tip.

A badger will cost you about $25 in the US and is well worth it, plus I'm pretty sure you can't wreck it! (I've been pretty mean to mine and there's no way to clog it, really.) If I were you I'd save the expensive aerograph for other work and get a badger for chocolate work.

As for using the propellant cans.... first it's not really air in there so I'm not sure you want to be spraying that stuff on food items. Second, it's not very cost effective to use them....they're designed to be used in remote locations if I'm not mistaken. I think you should see if you can get a compressor.....just make sure it's a compressor designer for an airbrush bcause they run a lot quieter than the compressors you can get at the hardware store.

Thank you Sugarella , everything I needed to know.I have a really cheapy air brush , and I was contemplating to get the budger ,I am looking into ebay to get an air compressor for hobbyes airbrushing etc ,I think like you said is cos effective and yes the gas in the can is kinda dubious.Thank you for all the info soo much :smile:

Vanessa

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Thank you Sugarella , everything I needed to know.I have a really cheapy air brush , and I was contemplating to get the budger ,I am looking into ebay to get an air compressor for hobbyes airbrushing etc ,I think like you said is cos effective and yes the gas in the can is kinda dubious.Thank you for all the info soo much  :smile:

The airbrush compressor is also important because of the moisture trap. You do not want moisture coming through into your cocoa butter obviously, and an airbrush compressor has a built-in trap to capture any moisture coming through it.

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Don't forget to keep an eye out for a 50% one item coupon if you have a Michael's Craft Store in your area since they carry Badger air brushes. Every little bit helps.

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Pamela Wilkinson

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Life is a rush into the unknown. You can duck down and hope nothing hits you, or you can stand tall, show it your teeth and say "Dish it up, Baby, and don't skimp on the jalapeños."

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What kind of compressor you guys use?

Air brush type ( small type just for hobbyes etc ) or a regular heavy duty one with an adaptor?

A freidn of mine told me not to bother with a little one , if my husband gets a regular one to work on his progect , I can ude that with an adaptor.

What is you experience, I am behind couple of badger compressor ,on is the cyclone II the other is the whirlwind II .

Vanessa

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What kind of compressor you guys use?

Air brush type ( small type just for hobbyes etc ) or a regular heavy duty one with an adaptor?

A freidn of mine told me not to bother with a little one , if my husband gets a regular one to work on his progect , I can ude that with an adaptor.

What is you experience, I am behind couple of badger compressor ,on is the cyclone II the other is the whirlwind II .

I am seriously thinking of buying a general use compressor that I can use for different projects. This Craftsman model looks good to me:

http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?...UseBVCookie=Yes

It has an oil-free pump so it should be safe for food, a 4 gallon tank so the motor shouldn't run frequently, and has a regulator adjustable up to 150 PSI max. At 40PSI I should be able to spray quite a bit before the motor kicks in to recharge the tank. It does weigh 40lbs, but that's not a big deal for me. I like the idea of being able to use it for other uses such as filling high pressure bike tires.

Does anyone know why this might not be a good idea?

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What kind of compressor you guys use?

Air brush type ( small type just for hobbyes etc ) or a regular heavy duty one with an adaptor?

A freidn of mine told me not to bother with a little one , if my husband gets a regular one to work on his progect , I can ude that with an adaptor.

What is you experience, I am behind couple of badger compressor ,on is the cyclone II the other is the whirlwind II .

I am seriously thinking of buying a general use compressor that I can use for different projects. This Craftsman model looks good to me:

http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?...UseBVCookie=Yes

It has an oil-free pump so it should be safe for food, a 4 gallon tank so the motor shouldn't run frequently, and has a regulator adjustable up to 150 PSI max. At 40PSI I should be able to spray quite a bit before the motor kicks in to recharge the tank. It does weigh 40lbs, but that's not a big deal for me. I like the idea of being able to use it for other uses such as filling high pressure bike tires.

Does anyone know why this might not be a good idea?

David,

There are a couple of things with this compressor that strike me. First, let me say I am not an expert on this. I am learning about this too being in the market for one myself. However, I tend to do a LOT of research on things like this when I'm making these kinds of decisions, and I also happen to have the lucky advantage of having a husband who works with compressors quite a bit and so has been able to provide me with much guidance.

I think this compressor is much more than you're going to need, unless you have applications other than chocolate work you're buying it for. Unless you plan on continuous airbrushing all day long, you don't need a 1 hp, 4-gallon unit. That's a lot of compressor (for a chocolatier), so you'd really be 'over buying' capacity. (Most airbrush compressors start at 1/8 hp or less.) Second, this isn't an airbrushing compressor, so it doesn't have a moisture trap, which means you'd need to add an in-line moisture trap. That can be done, just know you'd need to do it and will add to your expense. Third, and perhaps most importantly is noise. I guarantee you this unit will be loud. Much louder than any compressor built and marketed as an airbrush compressor. Not that airbrush compressors are silent, but the manufacturers of airbrush compressors have gone to some lengths to minimize noise, and this is important...very important. If you've never been around them (and I have), trust me on this. I'm even considering going the 'build your own' route with CO2 to build a silent unit. It also has the advantage of being completely moisture-free. I probably won't, and I'll probably end up buying a very small airbrush compressor, but that is how important the noise issue can be.

That's my $.02.

Edited to add: David...I should have read your post a little more closely...I just saw that you do plan on using this for other applications as well. Just note that for your chocolate work, you absolutely must have a moisture trap. Also, depending upon how much time you use your airbrush for chocolate work, you might want to consider building a sound-proofed, ventilated box for it. In some quick trolling of an airbrush bulletin board that seemed to be one way to go in overcoming the noise issue.

Edited by WhiteTruffleGirl (log)
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I have the badger Air brush and it works great. (I did have some trouble spraying cocoa powder and cocoa butter mixture but I think it has to do with the ratio). I am worried though since I used the cans that the package came with (they said compressed air). I don't do a lot of airbrushing, but should I get a compressor?

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I think this compressor is much more than you're going to need, unless you have applications other than chocolate work you're buying it for.  Unless you plan on continuous airbrushing all day long, you don't need a  1 hp, 4-gallon unit.  That's a lot of compressor (for a chocolatier), so you'd really be 'over buying' capacity.  (Most airbrush compressors start at 1/8 hp or less.)  Second, this isn't an airbrushing compressor, so it doesn't have a moisture trap, which means you'd need to add an in-line moisture trap.  That can be done, just know you'd need to do it and will add to your expense.  Third, and perhaps most importantly is noise.  I guarantee you this unit will be loud.  Much louder than any compressor built and marketed as an airbrush compressor.  Not that airbrush compressors are silent, but the manufacturers of airbrush compressors have gone to some lengths to minimize noise, and this is important...very important.  If you've never been around them (and I have), trust me on this.  I'm even considering going the 'build your own' route with CO2 to build a silent unit.  It also has the advantage of being completely moisture-free.  I probably won't, and I'll probably end up buying a very small airbrush compressor, but that is how important the noise issue can be.

That's my $.02.

Edited to add:  David...I should have read your post a little more closely...I just saw that you do plan on using this for other applications as well.  Just note that for your chocolate work, you absolutely must have a moisture trap.  Also, depending upon how much time you use your airbrush for chocolate work, you might want to consider building a sound-proofed, ventilated box for it.  In some quick trolling of an airbrush bulletin board that seemed to be one way to go in overcoming the noise issue.

Thanks for the input.

The noise is an important issue. I've heard this particular model run some time ago and I recall that it was fairly loud (specs say 82db). The thing is I would only be perparing a mold or two at a time so I figure I could charge the tank in the garage and bring it in to the kitchen to spray. With a 4gal tank I can't see the compressor running very often regardless. The weight and bulk would actually be more of a factor. Also, would I really need a moisture trap with the air coming from the tank rather than directly from the pump? Wouldn't the tank act as a big moisture trap itself?

I like the idea of silent spraying and I could get a scuba tank to do the same thing. I've got a regulator so all I would need is a secondary regulator to apply to the inflator hose. The air is perfectly dry, so no problem with moisture. The downside is the cost of the tank and the trouble with carrying it around and getting it refilled, as well as the inspections, etc.

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Thanks for the input.

The noise is an important issue.  I've heard this particular model run some time ago and I recall that it was fairly loud (specs say 82db).  The thing is I would only be perparing a mold or two at a time so I figure I could charge the tank in the garage and bring it in to the kitchen to spray.  With a 4gal tank I can't see the compressor running very often regardless.  The weight and bulk would actually be more of a factor.  Also, would I really need a moisture trap with the air coming from the tank rather than directly from the pump?  Wouldn't the tank act as a big moisture trap itself?

I like the idea of silent spraying and I could get a scuba tank to do the same thing.  I've got a regulator so all I would need is a secondary regulator to apply to the inflator hose.  The air is perfectly dry, so no problem with moisture.  The downside is the cost of the tank and the trouble with carrying it around and getting it refilled, as well as the inspections, etc.

David,

I asked my husband about this because he knows far more about it than I do. Yes, the tank will trap about 90% of the moisture, but it will not trap all of it. In order to have a completely dry spraying environment, you will you still need a moisture trap.

The scuba tank is another good option. I guess which route you pick really depends upon what's going to be most cost effective and convenient.

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I think I am going to get an air brush compressor anyway, I want something not too big that I can move around .

Now A questrion to you WTGirl :smile: , do I still have to purchase a moisture trap for this type of compressor ?

Thank you

Vanessa

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I think I am going to get an air brush compressor anyway, I want something not too big that I can move around .

Now A questrion to you WTGirl  :smile: , do I still have to purchase a moisture trap for this type of compressor ?

Thank you

Airbrush compressors have a moisture trap built into them, so no, you do not need to purchase one.

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  • 2 weeks later...

gallery_44494_2818_11990.jpg

gallery_44494_2818_22174.jpg

gallery_44494_2818_22174.jpg

There are my new experiments , after I got my compressor ( I then decided to get one for air brushes a badger one ), and my little badger and some of the jewel collection coca butter from rubber chef.

Results definatly satisfying , I am very pleased with it , now I just need to get over those darn transfer sheets :wacko:

Vanessa

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  • 2 weeks later...

Ok anoher question raise now.

I have noticed that when I do colored molded chocolates I tend to have more air pockes in the finish product , wich ofcourse ruin them,expecially with the mold with more detailed partiulars .Now I know I probably need to get a vibrating table as soon as I can , because even if I bea the hell out of the mold on the counter I still get little air pockets at the end .I just did several sprayed molds and they turned to be very very cool looking , but those darn holes really dont look that good.

So its just a matter to buy a vibrating table to shake all the air bubbles out , or something else I should be aware of?

Thank you, any suggestion , tip etc is higly appreaciated , as usuall :biggrin:

Vanessa

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Vanessa, those chocolates are really beautiful!  great job  :biggrin:

what brand of air brush did you end up buying?

i don't see any holes or bubbles in the photos...are they very small?

Thank you Alana :raz: .I end up buying the badger .In those one I actually didnt get any bubbles , the last ones I made have more detailes , and I did get several bubbles in those.

Vanessa

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  • 9 months later...

This thread deserves a bump - it's been a great resource for me, and I'm sure we'll all still got more to say... As for my attempts at the showroom finish, I'm all hooked up now, with a compressor and an airbrush and a few colors of cocoa butter and some acetate and some brushes. Been playing around with what I can do with all of it - tomorrow I'll be testing out some homemade transfer sheets.

But... what I really want to know is how people think they got the effect you can see in this picture:

http://www.dr.ca/MouldsUtensilsChocolate/P...s/10_Bonbon.jpg

I just got this mold in the mail today, and want to try experimenting with it. Is it just airbrushed with the color on the one side?

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This thread deserves a bump - it's been a great resource for me, and I'm sure we'll all still got more to say...  As for my attempts at the showroom finish, I'm all hooked up now, with a compressor and an airbrush and a few colors of cocoa butter and some acetate and some brushes.  Been playing around with what I can do with all of it - tomorrow I'll be testing out some homemade transfer sheets.

But... what I really want to know is how people think they got the effect you can see in this picture:

http://www.dr.ca/MouldsUtensilsChocolate/P...s/10_Bonbon.jpg

I just got this mold in the mail today, and want to try experimenting with it.  Is it just airbrushed with the color on the one side?

Neat looking mold! I think you are correct that it is just airbrushed on one side.

Who makes the mold by the way?

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