Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Leg of Lamb


Ron Johnson
 Share

Recommended Posts

So many good ideas. Just like to throw in something different here. I do the garlic inserts, as many have said. Place leaves of cinnamon basil in olive oil, rub the lamb lightly with coarse pepper, then olive oil and red wine. Lay the leaves of basil all over the top of the leg, sticking a few in any crevice you can find. Set the leg on little carrots and potatoes, fingerlings if you can find them, or small reds. Roast all in the oven until lamb is medium rare and make gravy from juices. Serve with the roasted veggies, a cucumber and onion salad in yogurt with lemon peel and dill, and a crusty bread.

OR (we are in Texas :wink:)

We like to smoke it on the grill, rubbed with garlic and mustard, served with roasted corn, fresh thick sliced tomatoes in lemon juice, chilis and cilantro, and garlic bread, for just plain down home food.

Leftover lamb does make the best sandwiches, and stews; I would choose lamb over beef any day. :biggrin:

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 6 months later...

I've got a great boned leg of lamb that I want to stuff with wild mushrooms and goat cheese next weekend for a dinner party.

1) This stuffing just came to me and sounds good but I can't really seem to find a recipe anywhere for the combo. Am I nuts or does this sound good to you too?

2) I will of course sautee the mushrooms with some garlic, evoo, rosemary first

3) after tying up the lamb with mushroom and cheese stuffing I will make slits and insert more garlic and rosemary

4) Should I put a little stock in the bottom of my roaster? Ideas on temps? 350, 400F?

5) What are your ideas?????

Thanks!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've got a great boned leg of lamb that I want to stuff with wild mushrooms and goat cheese next weekend for a dinner party.

1) This stuffing just came to me and sounds good but I can't really seem to find a recipe anywhere for the combo. Am I nuts or does this sound good to you too?

2) I will of course sautee the mushrooms with some garlic, evoo, rosemary first

3) after tying up the lamb with mushroom and cheese stuffing I will make slits and insert more garlic and rosemary

4) Should I put a little stock in the bottom of my roaster? Ideas on temps? 350, 400F?

5) What are your ideas?????

Thanks!!!

Hi, if this helps, I very recently came across an epicurious recipe for leg of lamb stuffed with greens and wild mushrooms, and one of the reviewers had successfully added cheese in there. I can't vouch for it personally, but it got 4 forks. I came across it when I was searching for "leg of lamb" and "fall".

If nothing else, it will give you some idea of time and temp.

I happen to have a bone-in whole leg with an indian yogurt marinade sitting n the fridge right now (Madhur Jaffrey recipe, this one)... must be something in the air :smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd omit the cheese. Lamb is fairly fatty, and I don't think the cheese will help. Breadcrumbs, or greens, or apricots...

Best way is to use a digital themometer and cook until the centre is 55C/130F for rare or a bit more (60C/145f) for medium. Fortunately lamb is pretty tolerant

Two ways to cook it:

a) Fast 400F/200C oven, for between 90 minutes and 2 hours. Let rest in a wrm place for half an hour

b) Slow, I much prefer this method. 7 hours is a 65C/150F oven. Results in much more tender meat, and is easier to control

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, I'd leave the cheese, although I might use a sheep-milk cheese rather than goat (I like "variations on a theme" and just did a pasta with lamb ragu and romano cheese, quite nice). Although if it's really good, strongly flavored lamb and a mild goat cheese, MAYBE the combination will be balanced. But I agree with Jackal10 that some breadcrumbs would be a good addition, to soak up the fat/juices as necessary.

And I'm not so sure you would still need to do the garlic-and-rosemary-in-slits, given the stuffing. Might be a little overkill, especially if you've already added them to the stuffing. Just a light rub with olive oil and a sprinkling with salt and pepper should be sufficient, the extra flavor working from the inside out already.

As for time and temp, I defer to those who do it more.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

To piggyback onto this topic, I asked this in the Absurdly Simple Cooking questions thread but didn't get a response:

Why is that you can both braise a leg of lamb or roast it? Which method is better?

With roasts or grilling I understand that the meat ideal for it has only the marbling kind of fat to melt and keep the meat tender. Meats for braising need to have alot of connective tissue. Seems to me that leg of lamb has that in abundance, yet it is more often that you see it roasted or grilled? I did do a roasted leg of lamb last spring and that fact occured to me with all the fat and connective tissue evident when I had it laying opened up for stuffing. I cooked it medium rare (actually more towards rare) and while the meat was delicious there was, I thought, alot of "waste" in the form of chewy bits and fat that otherwise would have broken down nicely with a few hours in a covered pot simmering away with white wine. But I liked that medium rare meat!

Any tips/thoughts on how to get around this?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So far great input guys, thank you! So now I'm thinking just the wild mushrooms for stuffing.... god, I just love that goat cheese mixture though...hmmm.

And Kevin brings up a good point. Should I strictly be roasting this or should I braise the leg after browning it. Oh! So many ways to do lamb! Yum!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd certainly keep the cheese. The lamb may be a bit fatty, but IMO cooking can never be too rich. Throw it all in there, be decadent ;).

He don't mix meat and dairy,

He don't eat humble pie,

So sing a miserere

And hang the bastard high!

- Richard Wilbur and John LaTouche from Candide

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Slow roast, then flash the outside.

Braise is not as good, and comes out more fatty, to my taste. I guess the fat gets incorporated in the braising liquid. Lamb stew often feature a lot of bans or potatoes to soak up the fat.

Haricot beans are good with lamb. So are turnips.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the shank end braises well and can be surprisingly good that way. As you move up towards the shoulder though, I think that roasting is the way to go. I am also a rare to medium rare enthusiast for the meat in this portion of the leg. It might be difficult to get the stuffing cooked to satisfaction and still be on the rare side, but I 'm sure it will be quite good nonetheless.

Cheers,

HC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't leave out the goats cheese, it'll taste great.

however it could just pour out of any gaps, my advice would be to try and wrap the joint in creponette, (pigs caul), this should hold it together, seal, stud with rosemary and garlic, and roast at 160C until med rare. I'm jealous.

what ever you do I hope its great

Alex.

after all these years in a kitchen, I would have thought it would become 'just a job'

but not so, spending my time playing not working

www.e-senses.co.uk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dinner was a big hit, thanks for all of your advice!! I decided to go with my original instinct and the flavors were great!

I sauteed a bunch of chanterelles that I just got at the market yesterday morning in evoo, minced garlic and shallots that had already been sweated. once the mushrooms were sauteeing I added some fresh rosemary to the mixture.

I had chunked up the chevre and placed in a bowl. Once my mushrooms were nicely cooked I added this to the bowl of chevre and mixted it together. I deglazed the pan with a bit of homemade beef stock and transfered it to a small sauce pan.

Trimmed the excess fat off my boneless lamb leg and seasoned the inside with S&P. I spread the cooled mushroom mixture inside and rolled it up tight. Tied well with string and let it sit in the fridge for the afternoon.

About a half hour before cooking I took it out and placed in in the sautee pan that I had cooked the mushroom mixture in. I have a big all clad pan that I love to put in the oven. It seemed to be the perfect size and already had all those yummy bits on the bottom! Seasoned the top of the lamb liberally with s&p. I mixed up a bunch of multicolored new potatoes with evoo, rosemary, S&P and spread those around the lamb in the pan.

Everything went into the oven at 425 for just about 1 hour. The lamb came out to rest, just a bit of stuffing had popped out, but the potatoes were happy with that :smile: It also had a really nice crust on the top! I deglazed the pan again with some open pinotage my guests had brought over. Then added more beef stock a bit of water and the stock from the first deglaze. Let it cook for a few, seasoned it a bit and strained it into a sauce pan. Let this thicken just a bit.

Served the lamb sliced into 1/2 inch pieces with the baby new potatoes and the sauce. It was really yummy, everyone cleaned their plates and now I have no leftovers :sad:

I ended up cooking it to med and next time I would have taken it out earlier as I like my lamb a bit rare in the middle. But everything else I would do again!!

This was the first time I went without a recipe and just on my instincts, it is a compliment to this site for sure! Thanks again everyone!

Sorry no pictures, my friends think I'm a bit goofy with the online stuff anyway....trying to explain why I was taking pictures of our food to share would have been funny~ haha! :raz:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 7 months later...

mmmm-mmmm.... leg of lamb, butterflied, on the grill.

butterfly the leg (mine was boneless, about 4 lbs), cut away excess fat, sprinkle with Kosher salt and frehly ground coarse peppercorn melange (black, white, red, green peppercorns).

gallery_12550_103_28526.jpg

marinated in fridge for about 5 or 6 hrs with about a pound or so of yogurt, 4 minced garlic cloves, sprigs of fresh chopped rosemary (about 2 tbsp), and sprig each of fresh (chiffonade) lemon basil and cinnamon basil (herbs and garlic from my garden).

gallery_12550_103_942.jpg

remove from the marinade and skewer the leg a few times each direction for easier manipulation on the grill. i used wooden skewers (7) because i had them.

gallery_12550_103_79445.jpg

grilled over high fire for about 12 to 15 minutes each side (135F was the read on my thermometer and it was deep pink and tender).

gallery_12550_103_113098.jpg

let rest a good 10 minutes. sliced to serve.

gallery_12550_103_44575.jpg

this has to be my new fav for grilling lamb. :wub: the flavor was rich and savory, the meat was very tender with a good texture. and great for sandwiches on freshly baked onion rye sourdough bread the next couple of days also. :biggrin:

edited to add the forgotten cinnamon basil to marinade.... :blush:

Edited by lovebenton0 (log)

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've been doing butterflied leg of lamb on the grill for 35 years. It's my standard "go to" dish for small dinner parties during the summer.

I posted my recipe and method in Recipe Gullet sometime back. Here is it is:

Grilled Butterflied Leg of Lamb

Edited by Smithy
Repaired broken link (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like your recipe Jaymes. I see you use soy sauce. I use this too and find it to be a 'magic ingredient' that manages to blend in without making itself known.

LovebentonO, your lamb looks really good. I've used yoghurt marinades on chicken before, but never lamb. Must try this one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've used yoghurt marinades on chicken before, but never lamb.  Must try this one.

Marinating lamb in yogurt is very typical of Middle Eastern dishes. Here's another one you might like to try:

Tah Chin (rice & lamb in yogurt sauce)

Ingredients in order of use:

3 to 4 lb shoulder of lamb (trimmed; bite-sized chunks)

2 C plain yogurt (better if you make your own, of course, but if not, store-bought will do)

1/4 t ground cinnamon

1/4 t salt

1/4 t pepper

1 t saffron

2 1/2 C rice

1 1/2 t salt

1 egg, beaten

1 t saffron

2 qts water

2 T salt

1/2 C butter

Refrigerate lamb in yogurt, cinnamon, salt, 1t saffron overnite.

Combine rice and salt with enough cold water to cover and allow to soak overnight.

Next day: Remove lamb from yogurt mixture (reserve yogurt), arrange in ovenproof casserole and bake at 375 for 30 minutes.

To reserved yogurt mixture, add 1 egg and 1 tsp saffron; beat to combine.

Drain rice that has been soaking.

Bring to boil 2 qts water. Add 2 T salt and drained rice and boil for 10-15 minutes. Pour rice into colander and rinse with lukewarm water.

Remove lamb from baking dish and set aside.

Combine yogurt/egg mixture with rice.

In bottom of baking dish, melt 1/2 C butter with 2 T water. Over melted butter arrange half of rice. Scatter lamb cubes over rice. Top with remaining rice. Cover tightly. Bake at 400 for 14 minutes. Then reduce heat to 325 and bake for an additional 40 minutes. Serves 6.

(Note - this sounds complicated, but is actually quite easy)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've used yoghurt marinades on chicken before, but never lamb.  Must try this one.

Marinating lamb in yogurt is very typical of Middle Eastern dishes. Here's another one you might like to try:

Tah Chin (rice & lamb in yogurt sauce)

Ingredients in order of use:

3 to 4 lb shoulder of lamb (trimmed; bite-sized chunks)

2 C plain yogurt (better if you make your own, of course, but if not, store-bought will do)

1/4 t ground cinnamon

1/4 t salt

1/4 t pepper

1 t saffron

2 1/2 C rice

1 1/2 t salt

1 egg, beaten

1 t saffron

2 qts water

2 T salt

1/2 C butter

Refrigerate lamb in yogurt, cinnamon, salt, 1t saffron overnite.

Combine rice and salt with enough cold water to cover and allow to soak overnight.

Next day: Remove lamb from yogurt mixture (reserve yogurt), arrange in ovenproof casserole and bake at 375 for 30 minutes.

To reserved yogurt mixture, add 1 egg and 1 tsp saffron; beat to combine.

Drain rice that has been soaking.

Bring to boil 2 qts water. Add 2 T salt and drained rice and boil for 10-15 minutes. Pour rice into colander and rinse with lukewarm water.

Remove lamb from baking dish and set aside.

Combine yogurt/egg mixture with rice.

In bottom of baking dish, melt 1/2 C butter with 2 T water. Over melted butter arrange half of rice. Scatter lamb cubes over rice. Top with remaining rice. Cover tightly. Bake at 400 for 14 minutes. Then reduce heat to 325 and bake for an additional 40 minutes. Serves 6.

(Note - this sounds complicated, but is actually quite easy)

this sounds easy and marvelous, Jaymes. hmmmm.... a little adjustment and maybe not a bad way to use rare leftover lamb either, i would think... a bit pumped from plainer lamb and rice.

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How thin do you slice the leg of lamb?  Do you go out of your way to slice it against the grain?

i do, across the grain. the texture is much preferrable to me.

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How thin do you slice the leg of lamb?  Do you go out of your way to slice it against the grain?

i do, across the grain. the texture is much preferrable to me.

I remember reading once that the leg has different muscle groups with the grain going in different directions. Do you carve out the seperate muscle pieces in big chunks of meat? Is it easy to determine these seperate muscle pieces?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How thin do you slice the leg of lamb?  Do you go out of your way to slice it against the grain?

i do, across the grain. the texture is much preferrable to me.

I remember reading once that the leg has different muscle groups with the grain going in different directions. Do you carve out the seperate muscle pieces in big chunks of meat? Is it easy to determine these seperate muscle pieces?

i don't pre-carve it that way myself once cooked, but have for lamb i'm planning to cube. i generally buy the half leg for us. instead, i alter my slicing as i go. it has never seemed to be that difficult to me to tell the direction of the muscle grain. however, that's not a bad idea if one had a large (whole) leg o' lamb to work with...

i have also done that with the shoulder, which tends to be a mess of convoluted muscle mass and benefits the carver by having some pre-treatment.

Judith Love

North of the 30th parallel

One woman very courteously approached me in a grocery store, saying, "Excuse me, but I must ask why you've brought your dog into the store." I told her that Grace is a service dog.... "Excuse me, but you told me that your dog is allowed in the store because she's a service dog. Is she Army or Navy?" Terry Thistlewaite

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...