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Time interval of Persian rice stove wanted/convert conventional to Persian rice stove


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Hello,

 

There are these Persian rice stoves that can prepare rice with crust. Unfortunately, they are not so good at cooking normal rice. So I want to make my rice stove a Persian one.
The Persian only heats for a certain amount of time and then turns off, then heats again. After an hour you have rice with crust. Does anyone know the time interval what is used?

 

I would then just buy a digital timer, cook rice and then block the switch and turn on the timer.

 

Unfortunately, I would need the time interval. Maybe someone has such a stove and can observe it.

 

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Years ago I gave Persian friends a lovely Le Creuset enameled cast iron pot as a wedding present.  They asked what they should do with it?  I explained it was for cooking rice.  They were mystified.  "Everyone in Iran uses rice cookers."

 

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38 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Years ago I gave Persian friends a lovely Le Creuset enameled cast iron pot as a wedding present.  They asked what they should do with it?  I explained it was for cooking rice.  They were mystified.  "Everyone in Iran uses rice cookers."

 

 

Yeah, the first time I saw a rice cooker was in Iran back in the Shah's days.

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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Rice crust  (锅巴) is also popular here in China, but now that almost everyone has a rice cooker, no one makes it at home any more. Rice cookers just can't do it. 

 

Now we just buy it from the market where enough customers makes it worthwhile for someone to make by the old method.

 

guoba.thumb.jpg.bab0c858f106d55fcc405e61415185cb.jpg

Edited by liuzhou (log)
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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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5 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

Rice crust  (锅巴) is also popular here in China, but now that almost everyone has a rice cooker, no one makes it any more. Rice cookers just can't do it. 

 

Now we just buy it from the market where enough customers makes it worthwhile for someone to make by the old method.

j

 

I am assured Iranian rice cooker technology is sufficient for the task.

 

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4 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I am assured Iranian rice cooker technology is sufficient for the task.

 

 

Perhaps, but the OP seems to trying to make it with a conventional rice cooker and a clock! Can't see it working.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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17 minutes ago, weinoo said:

 

The Epicurious article has one major flaw. It says 

 

The main difference between a Persian rice cooker and Asian ones is that the latter, like the highly-rated Zojirushi, has a setting that prevents the rice from burning—a great feature if you want a bowl of steaming, fluffy rice. If you want the crispy bottom, however, you're out of luck (unless you rig the timer on the machine, as some people do).“

 

Very few Asian rice cookers have timers. They have 'thermostats' to switch them to 'keep warm' mode when the internal temp reaches 100°C, meaning all the water has been absorbed. To achieve the crisped rice mentioned the temp must rise above 100°C which the machine simply can't do, unless the thermostat is disabled, thereby ruining the cooker for its intended purpose.

 

If you are deperate for the crisped rice, buy a Persian rice cooker - they aren't expensive.

 

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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Or I suppose one might make it as the author of the second article does, on the stovetop.

 

As a matter of fact, oodles of recipes for stovetop tahdig. Some even use a rice cooker and then continue by using that cooked rice in another pan.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

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I have a National  ( panasonic ) rice cooker.

 

10 Asian Cups.

 

ive had it for a very very long time.

 

2002.

 

It was shipped from Chinatown in Toronto

 

as that was the only place that carried RC's back then

 

it has a flat bottom 

 

not sure if that has anything to do with it.

 

but It makes   ' persian style rice ' specifically for the crunchy bottom.

 

and we all know Panasonic is Japanese , and this one was actually made in Japan.

 

not sure about the Japanese interest in Crunchy Bottoms ...

 

so yes, rice cookers ( specific ones Id guess w that feature )

 

can make Crunchy Bottom Rice.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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The old school rice cookers could give you a crust (Hitachi, Toshiba, Panasonic). They didn't have the silicone seal on the lid and, possibly, the inner pot sat more directly on the burner (heating element). Also, no nonstick coating on the inner pot.

 

Here's what they looked like. (Photos come from online adverts. They're still available for purchase. The old Toshibas seem very expensive, though.)

 

2134129526_ScreenShot2021-01-25at7_17_44AM.png.ff4a7bf6e8e93db54df1cf9a8e60878f.png

 

1762303539_ScreenShot2021-01-25at7_11_22AM.png.070e4fb90276e78bc9800e97c59c78c4.png

 

 

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@MokaPot 

 

nice

 

based on this book :

 

https://www.amazon.com/Ultimate-Rice-Cooker-Cookbook-Porridges/dp/1558326677

 

I moved to ' Fuzzy "

 

worked for me .

 

BTW Fuzzy :

 

consider watching this movie :

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rising_Sun_(film)

 

back in teat day , Japan was buying everything

 

fuzzy or not 

 

Im sure no rice was over cooked in this movie.

 

Im going watch it again

 

w my dinner soon.

 

Sean Connery atbhis best

Edited by rotuts (log)
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I still think what I had in mind could work. The biggest problem might be that the rice cookers are not designed to get over 100 degrees. The device could be damaged

I also could buy this device, which can do both:

https://www.reishunger.de/produkt/1422/digitaler-mini-reiskocher

but it's to expensive for me.

 

Persian rice cookers have just not at all the 
function that they turn off when the water has evaporated.
But only a timer, which is not good for Asian cuisine.

Edited by souphead (log)
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20 hours ago, souphead said:

The Persian only heats for a certain amount of time and then turns off, then heats again. After an hour you have rice with crust. Does anyone know the time interval what is used?

 

I would then just buy a digital timer, cook rice and then block the switch and turn on the timer.

 

Unfortunately, I would need the time interval. Maybe someone has such a stove and can observe it.

 

 

@souphead. Sorry to be dense here.

 

Are you wanting to cook the rice (until the rice cooker automatically turns off), let it sit, then turn the rice cooker back on again in order to form a crust?

 

"Time interval" means period of time between (1) when rice cooker automatically turns off (the first time) and (2) when you turn the rice cooker back on again?

 

How about just experimenting, starting with a 30-minute rest period after the the cooker automatically turns off (the first time)?

 

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I want to cook it normally first until the water evaporates.

 

Then block the switch and turn on the timer. Now it must turn on and off several times (the rice should then be ready after 45 minutes).
How often and how long it goes on and off during this time I would need to know. 

 

But I will just try it out

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2 hours ago, souphead said:

I want to cook it normally first until the water evaporates.

 

Then block the switch and turn on the timer. Now it must turn on and off several times (the rice should then be ready after 45 minutes).
How often and how long it goes on and off during this time I would need to know. 

 

But I will just try it out

 

What does "block the switch" mean? Maybe you could post a photo of your cooker.

 

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I mean with a small piece of wood to keep the switch in the cooking position and prevent it from going to the warm position when the thermostat is triggered. 

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It just seems crazy to me to risk blowing up your rice cooker (and any warranty) to force it to do something it was designed not to do, especially when you can buy a machine designed for the job for less than $70.

 

(eG-friendly Amazon.com link)(eG-friendly Amazon.com link)

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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7 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

It just seems crazy to me to risk blowing up your rice cooker (and any warranty) to force it to do something it was designed not to do, especially when you can buy a machine designed for the job for less than $70.

 

(eG-friendly Amazon.com link)(eG-friendly Amazon.com link)

 

I am almost tempted.

 

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