Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Gevalia Coffee...Is it any good?


Recommended Posts

Hey, awbrig,

My wife says this is very good coffee but it's very expensive. She used to get some of this before I met her. As a consequence, we have a Gevalia ceramic coffee container in our kitchen. In our house, this contains coffee from Yuban, Kirkland, Don Francisco, whatever. I get the impression that you can get better coffee for the buck by going to a local roaster and buying from them. Other family members like the mail order stuff from Community Coffee in Louisiana.

I'm hollywood and I approve this message.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I started up w/ their service about 10 yrs ago for the sole purpose of getting the free coffee maker (I think at that time I was making about $700/month so getting a coffee maker was quite a luxury).

The coffee was pretty good...I don't recall it being extremely noteworthy in any way, though - and, as mentioned, the price was a little high in relation to the goods received.

I've got by w/ that same coffee maker for 10 yrs (the flip top cover where you pour in the water has broken) - it does the job, I mean it's an electric drip coffee maker...no big deal. But it has kept me from ever having to buy one

(note: I am an occasional coffee drinker and don't rely on it for daily sustenance).

The maker I have is the 4-cup model, which suits me just fine. The size is appropriate so coffee is not getting scorched/overheated while languishing on the burner...they do have several other offers out, though, and if you already have a drip coffee maker it's may be to your advantage to seek out one of their other offers, such as the offer w/ a carafe as a premium as opposed to the coffee maker.

As for the whole beans versus ground, I would think that would depend on what method you would be using to brew and grind...

Generally beans are preferable - - but as I recall most of their coffee is packaged in 1/4# packages so can be plowed through fairly effectively w/o losing a lot of freshness for the average coffee drinker if you are getting the ground.

Also, I'm not sure if they package any of their stuff in 'breathable' bags.

But, again, I'm a more casual coffee drinker, so my tastes are not quite as finely tuned as others may be.

...I thought I had an appetite for destruction but all I wanted was a club sandwich.

Link to post
Share on other sites

They are good quality beans and there are several varieties you can try to find a blend that suits you. Their service is very convenient, but you will be payng a premium for coffee that you can buy just as well from a local specialty store if one is nearby. Gevalia is owned by Kraft and they are subject to the same kind of mass market pressures that large corporate brands are. That said, I used their beans for a year and liked them.

I buy only whole beans and grind them as I use them. Ground coffee loses its essential oils in the form of gas very quickly.

Link to post
Share on other sites

That commercial is SO appealing. I think it's the free gifts that really draw me in. After all, the pricing seems so reasonable for 2 pounds of coffee -- if you factor in the current gifts of the coffee maker and some other essential life or death "but wait, that's not all" present. Good thing I've never been by a phone when the swanky, debonnaire Wall Street-type actor struts across my screen.

Ellen Shapiro

www.byellen.com

Link to post
Share on other sites

The coffee is adequate. The trick is to get the free coffee maker that they're offering and cancel your membership immediately. Thus, for about 10 bucks, you get a respectable drip maker and a pound of coffee. That's a pretty good deal. Of course, you're stuck with a coffee maker with a big Gevalia logo on it.

Dean McCord

VarmintBites

Link to post
Share on other sites

Years ago I recieved a gift of Gevalia for supporting a Seattle NPR station. they sent me half pond bags of 3 blends of beans. I found them to be less then fresh. For me freshness is the issue. Here in coffee mad Vancouver we have the option of finding small roasting houses with retail operations. My favorite is Continental on Commercial drive.

I have found however beans from a company in Chicago called Intelligensia to be worth seeking out. I believe they have no special offer just great coffee. I have also heard good things about Peet's, but alas I have yet to try thier beans. Good Luck.

David Cooper

"I'm no friggin genius". Rob Dibble

http://www.starlinebyirion.com/

Link to post
Share on other sites
have found however beans from a company in Chicago called Intelligensia to be worth seeking out. I believe they have no special offer just great coffee

This is the coffee that Charlie Trotter uses at the restaurant.

Edited by awbrig (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites
have found however beans from a company in Chicago called Intelligensia to be worth seeking out. I believe they have no special offer just great coffee

This is the coffee that Charlie Trotter uses at the restaurant.

And that the higher-end caterers like Food for Thought and Blue Plate use.

Ah, that seductive aroma at intermission time at Orchesta Hall.....

Margaret McArthur

"Take it easy, but take it."

Studs Terkel

1912-2008

A sensational tennis blog from freakyfrites

margaretmcarthur.com

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, my first cup of their Traditional Roast seemed a little weak to me. Perhaps I didnt use enough coffee for my taste but I was a little disappointed. Ill try in the morning with I hope better results...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Brig-

Go ahead and cancel your membership now. You keep the coffee maker (which is a good backup) and you don't have to pay anything else. Then you can get really good mail order coffee (or commission Fat Guy to roast some for you on a regular basis).

The avatar is very, very disturbing.

Dean McCord

VarmintBites

Link to post
Share on other sites

As an avid coffee drinker, I have had Gevalia and think it's OK as well. But, at over $15 a pound I don't think it's worth that much. What I now recommend to everyone who loves coffee is, what I consider to be the best coffee available, La Colombe Torrefaction. Started here in Philadelphia by two guys (one a Frenchman and one from Seattle), it is now the coffee served in the best restaurants in Philly (e.g. Le Bec Fin) and NYC. It sells for about $10 a pound and comes in 4 styles, Corsica (hearty and strong), Phocea (medium bodied), Nizza (more mild) and decaf. It is available through their website (www.lacolombe.com I think). Excellent in a drip maker, it is even better in a French press. Just my thoughts.

Link to post
Share on other sites

awbrig,

what type of coffee maker did you get? A year or so ago my hubby ordered their coffee and got the carafe style in black. I like it, because it makes really hot coffee, and the carafe keeps it hot for a long time. Plus the black color doesn't show the drip marks. We weren't so keen on the coffee that we wanted to spend a premium for it, so we cancelled the service shortly there after.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought the coffee was mediocre.

As for the free coffee maker, it mysteriously broke down the day I cancelled my membership. That is, it lasted less than a year.

I'm still paying for my foray into Gevalia by having to dodge their telemarketers and sift through the junk mail they keep sending. They have a very persistant direct marketing campaign.

Link to post
Share on other sites

We have used Gevalia coffee on and off over the years. They have excellent coffee, but "shipping and handling" make it more expensive than it is worth. There are so many excellent coffees on the market now at reasonable prices. I think that the secret with coffee is to find the best brand/roast/grind for the brewing method you use. Several years ago when we were using a drip coffee maker we tried the Mauro beans that come from Italy in one kilo bags and found the coffee pretty blah. When we tired of the drip method and switched to making americanos we tried the same coffee again and it was, and remains, perfect. Recently we tried the Gevalia again and found it equally good, but with the Mauro at $13.00 per kilo there is no contest.

I have never bought coffee ready ground but to grind it properly you must have a burr grinder. They are not cheap but our Saeco model has been going strong for 20 years or so.

Ruth Friedman

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wish I'd seen this thread earlier...

I was duped by the add a few years back and was so grossly disappointed by the coffee I had to call them up to see if I'd received an off bag.

The woman asked me to read the serial numbers from the bottom of the pouch and after we chatted I learned that my coffee (whole beans) had been roasted about 8 months prior! I asked if there was a way to have coffee roasted and sent out right away and after a long conversation found out that Gevalia has a warehouse of coffee waiting to be sent out and that they do not roast to order. I cancelled right then and there.

Ed Behr in the Art of Eating #56 (In which he also gives Shaw a nod for his Zagat article in Commentary) recommends a roaster in WABatdorf who apparently DO roast to order and send out. They also specialize in heirloom coffee varieties.

Link to post
Share on other sites

in denmark, gevalia is known for great advertising and poor coffee.

they have this never-ending-campaign "which coffee will you serve unexpected guests?" and one of the ads showed the ussr submarine that got caught on a reef in the swedish skjärgård near a naval base.

personally i'd reserve the coffee for unwelcome guests.

christianh@geol.ku.dk. just in case.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By Objective Foodie
      During the past year, our coffee consumption at home has increased substantially. We have tried beans from different roasteries from the UK and Europe, but we are constantly in the search of new ones. The speciality coffee market has been rapidly increasing in past years and it is becoming easier to find high quality beans.
       
      The best roasteries we have tried so far:
      UK based: Round Hill Roastery, Square Mile, Monmouth,  Pharmacie, New Ground, Workshop, James Gourmet, Ozone. Europe based: The Barn (Germany), Gardelli (Italy), Hard Beans (Poland), Calendar (Ireland), Roasted Brown (Ireland), Right Side (Spain), Coffee Collective (Denmark).  
      Have you had any exciting coffee beans lately? Do you have any other recommendations?
    • By Kasia
      INSTEAD OF COFFEE? - MORNING GREEN COCKTAIL
       
      After waking up, most of us head towards the kitchen for the most welcome morning drink. Coffee opens our eyes, gets us up and motivates us to act. Today I would like to offer you a healthy alternative to daily morning coffee. I don't want to turn you off coffee completely. After all, it has an excellent aroma and fantastic flavor. There isn't anything more relaxing during a busy day than a coffee break with friends.

      In spite of the weather outside, change your kitchen for a while and try something new. My green cocktail is also an excellent way to wake up and restore energy. Add to it a pinch of curcuma powder, which brings comfort and acts as a buffer against autumn depression.

      Ingredients (for 2 people):
      200ml of green tea
      4 new kale leaves
      1 green cucumber
      half an avocado
      1 pear
      1 banana
      pinch of salt
      pinch of curcuma

      Peel the avocado, pear and banana. Remove the core from the pear. Blend every ingredient very thoroughly. If the drink is too thick, add some green tea. Drink at once.

      Enjoy your drink!
       
       

    • By Kasia
      My Irish Coffee  
      Today the children will have to forgive me, but adults also sometimes want a little pleasure. This is a recipe for people who don't have to drive a car or work, i.e. for lucky people or those who can rest at the weekend. Irish coffee is a drink made with strong coffee, Irish Whiskey, whipped cream and brown sugar. It is excellent on cold days. I recommend it after an autumn walk or when the lack of sun really gets you down. Basically, you can spike the coffee with any whiskey, but in my opinion Jameson Irish Whiskey is the best for this drink.

      If you don't like whiskey, instead you can prepare another kind of spiked coffee: French coffee with brandy, Spanish coffee with sherry, or Jamaican coffee with dark rum.
      Ingredients (for 2 drinks)
      300ml of strong, hot coffee
      40ml of Jameson Irish Whiskey
      150ml of 30% sweet cream
      4 teaspoons of coarse brown sugar
      1 teaspoon of caster sugar
      4 drops of vanilla essence
      Put two teaspoons of brown sugar into the bottom of two glasses. Brew some strong black coffee and pour it into the glasses. Warm the whiskey and add it to the coffee. Whisk the sweet cream with the caster sugar and vanilla essence. Put it gently on top so that it doesn't mix with the coffee.

      Enjoy your drink!
       
       

    • By Kasia
      Today I would like to share with you the recipe for swift autumn cookies with French pastry and a sweet ginger-cinnamon-pear stuffing. Served with afternoon coffee they warm us up brilliantly and dispel the foul autumn weather.

      Ingredients (8 cookies)
      1 pack of chilled French pastry
      1 big pear
      1 flat teaspoon of cinnamon
      1 teaspoon of fresh grated ginger
      2 tablespoons of brown sugar
      1 teaspoon of vanilla sugar
      2 tablespoons of milk

      Heat the oven up to 190C. Cover a baking sheet with some baking paper.
      Wash the pear, peel and cube it. Add the grated ginger, cinnamon, vanilla sugar and one tablespoon of the brown sugar. Mix them in. Cut 8 circles out of the French pastry. Cut half of every circle into parallel strips. Put the pear stuffing onto the other half of each circle. Roll up the cookies starting from the edges with the stuffing. Put them onto the baking paper and make them into cones. Smooth the top of the pastry with the milk and sprinkle with brown sugar. bake for 20-22 minutes.

      Enjoy your meal!
       
       
       

    • By Johnhouse
      Hello everyone!
       
      I have been working in food and beverage industry for almost 10 years in different countries. I am looking forward to learn new things on this forum to expand my food and beverage knowledge as well as sharing my experiences that I gained in my journey!
       
      Have a good day! ☺️ 
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...