Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Pumpkin filling getting thick


Recommended Posts

So we're using the same pumpkin pie filling recipe we've been using for over 5 years:

20 oz pumpkin puree

9 oz granulated sugar

1 T cinnamon

8 oz cream

8 oz milk

8 oz egg

We add sugar and cinnamon to the puree, then add the wet ingredients. We mix by hand. It's a pretty liquid filling so we put it into one of those pouring dispensers and fill our tartlets as we need to. We usually store the filling for about 1 week.

BUT these last two batches have gotten really THICK after about 4 days. Almost like a mousse. And the taste is very off.

the cream seems fresh when we use it

the puree looks good

we use liquid eggs(but this year we're using cage free??)

we haven't forgotten the sugar

I can't think of a reason, besides the cage free which doesn't make sense, why this is turning into a mousse.

Stephanie Crocker

Sugar Bakery + Cafe

Link to post
Share on other sites

It sounds to me like you've just got too much bacteria in there. There's a lot of food for it, so its rapid growth is causing the milk and cream to set up: that can vary due to a ton of factors outside your control, but considering the ingredient combination you'ge got there I wouldn't want to store it for more than three days at fridge temps anyway, even though it's worked for you in the past. If you have your heart set on doing so you could consider pasteurizing the finished mix sous vide, which would extend its fridge life.

Chris Hennes
Director of Operations
chennes@egullet.org

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had the same thought as Chris: four days is a looong time for an uncooked egg mixture to sit around in the fridge. Regarding the eggs, their flavor can vary depending on the chickens' feed, but "off" flavors aren't really common in commercial eggs. If you were using backyard eggs fed on table scraps, I'd suggest the eggs as an odd-flavor culprit.

But it's probably just going south, thus the funky taste & texture.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm thinking you shouldn't hold any longer than 3 days. I recall in older sanitation classes any custard bases should be held for no longer than three days. It could be the cream, if you're using manufacturing cream, but, then again, it could be anything -there are many variables at play here.

Do you wipe down your walk-in with sanitizer daily, do a big cleanup weekly and take everything out and sanitize monthly? If not, it could be due to a build up of nasties in the walk-in. Have you checked the walk-in temp with a portable thermometer to not only check the temp but see if the thermometer on the unit is accurate? Are you sure people aren't putting large hot items (like stockpots) in the walk-in near your custard? Made sure no one leaves the door open for long periods of time? A few degrees difference makes a HUGE difference in food safety.

How's your dishwashing station? Are you starting with dry pots, or using ones still wet from the wash?

Are you washing the pumpkin cans before opening them?

Anyway, it could be a lot of things. And, I agree that a week is far too long to hold a mix like this.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm surprised about the "no-more-than-3 day rules" too since last year we made the filling once/week. We made another batch yesterday and I'm watching the progress to see when it "turns". So far, looking good on day two. I'm also going to ask my health inspector about this three day rule.

Stephanie Crocker

Sugar Bakery + Cafe

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...