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EatNopales

"Mexican Mornings" by Ruth Harkness

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I've had the time (sneaked from duties) to read two of the entries in Harkness' "Mexican Mornings" journal. Wonderful. The writing style is so lively and the content so interesting. I'm going to read them all as soon as I can. Thank you so much for finding this, EN.

Also Googled Harkness to read more about her. Fascinating woman.

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I've had the time (sneaked from duties) to read two of the entries in Harkness' "Mexican Mornings" journal. Wonderful. The writing style is so lively and the content so interesting. I'm going to read them all as soon as I can. Thank you so much for finding this, EN.

Also Googled Harkness to read more about her. Fascinating woman.

The writing style is fantastic and makes the current Gourmet articles seem about as stupid as Food Network celebrities. She was a WRITER who happened to cover travel & food.

With that said, I do think the vast majority of what she wrote was likely very embellished & distorted if not outright fabrication because it too conveniently plays in to the narratives, stereotypes & characters of the time... not just of Mexico but it parlays the world view of that time as captured in Hollywood movies.. the faraway strange land with a cast of unlikely world characters... impoverished Old World nobility, broken spirited American adventurers, feckless Spanish / Southern European descendants, noble savages all coming together in a magical realism setting where the clear sighted North American is the hero of all, and the only person with ultimate wisdom etc.,

With that said the descriptions of the dishes, recipes, typical market purchases is absolutely invaluable - she is too innocent & clueless about these to fabricate - and gives us a real insight into Mexican culinary traditions of the time.. which evidently have not changed all that much.

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EN, have you read Frances Toors? Some of her early writing was quite interesting, not only wiht regard to food but to some of the arts as well.

As to Gourmet...I received my first Gourmet in 1968 and was absolutely captivated by the writing. Neither the articles nor the recipes were dumbed down, nor did they pander to the lowest common denominator. I learned I could cook, and I learned that there was a world outside of San Diego that was clearly far more interesting and urbane :laugh:

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EN, have you read Frances Toors? Some of her early writing was quite interesting, not only wiht regard to food but to some of the arts as well.

As to Gourmet...I received my first Gourmet in 1968 and was absolutely captivated by the writing. Neither the articles nor the recipes were dumbed down, nor did they pander to the lowest common denominator. I learned I could cook, and I learned that there was a world outside of San Diego that was clearly far more interesting and urbane :laugh:

Thanks... no I haven't read her.

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