Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Recommended Posts

As far as the 'american' name goes, what you say makes sense, I'm just giving the titles from the English menu they gave me at the end, and some of the names are idiosyncratically translated from Catalan.

We also started with a bunch of cocktails. Perhaps because I'm a wine oriented guy (rarely drink anything over 15% alcohol and I'm happier near 13%), these were not my favorite part of the meal, though some were plenty terrific. It just felt like too much alcohol at that point. When I ate at El Bulli in 2007 I believe we had only one cocktail (cosmopolitan-mallow) and it was a killer start to the meal.

Anyway, the first cocktail was the one I really did not like, dry martini. You sprayed it onto your tongue and the overwhelming taste resembled grain alcohol.

dry martini.jpg

The other drinks were sugar cane mojito - caiprinha:

sugar cane mojito.jpg

after the strawberry came snow-fizz:

snow-fizz.jpg

then gin fizz:

gin fizz.jpg

This was followed by the Gorgonzola Globe, which kicked the meal into a much higher orbit for me.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks so much for posting these! It really brings back memories - I didn't take any pictures, but now I kind of wish I did... luckily for me, many of our dishes were the same, and your pictures look great!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Here come the photos of the final savory courses and the sweets section. By this time we had finished a wonderful bottle of 1989 La Rioja Alta 890 Gran Riserva and were well into what started as a glass of Bodegas Farina Gran Colegiata Campus 2001 but soon became the whole bottle. Which is a partial excuse for the more shaky quality of some of these photos. Of course we also had no natural light coming in through the window by this point.

One of the dishes that was presented as a bit of a challenge in terms of identifying what exactly we were tasting was roses/artichokes:

roses:artichokes.jpg

This was folowed by sea anemone with te:

sea anemone with te.jpg

Then came the delicious eel sandwich:

eel sandwich.jpg

This was followed by the complex abelone with iberian ham fat:

abalone with iberian ham fat.jpg

Then came one of my favorites, a take on a spring roll called suckling pig tail (sorry for the photo quality):

suckling pig tail.jpg

The next dish was something of a repeat from my 2007 meal, "hare juise with apple jelly-cru with black currant marinated", which was simply called "hare juise" last time. Anyway, the meaty flavor of the jelly was as rich and satisfying as a steak at Peter Lugers.

hare juise.jpg

We began to depart the weight of the savory section with a return to the frozen theme of the snacks in parmesan frozen-air with museli:

parmesan frozen air.jpg

This was followed by pond and puff pastry of pineapple:

pond.jpg

puff pastry.jpg

We knew the end was approaching with the passion fruit marshmallow, the stupendous chocolate handkerchief, and so-called shellfish:

passion fruit marshmallow.jpg

chocolate handkerchief.jpg

shellfish.jpg

We then moved back outside to the porch and leisurely enjoyed the morphings:

morphings.jpg

As full as I was, I managed to taste each of these incredible morsels. We drove back to Roses floating in air, and enjoyed our cigars on the patio of the hotel, trying to extend the experience forever.

Edited by victornet (log)
Link to post
Share on other sites

hey Victornet, thanks so much for posting these photos - it was the best meal of my life, and certainly the most memorable, but now, with your photos, it's even easier to remember a lot of the details.

Do you mind if I post a couple of the photos on another forum, specifically the Cooking Issues forum? We've been having a discussion about the clear 'potato paper' that held the thai salad and pine-nut shabu shabu... Thanks!

Link to post
Share on other sites

The funny thing about the pine nut shabu-shabu is that there was another component not in the photo that we were told to finish the dish with - sort of a pine leaf (I know leaf is not exactly right) - and it was by far the best part of the dish. The progression of little envelopes was a little precious and did not have the flavor payoff of the dish's closing note.

Link to post
Share on other sites

First of all, let me just say a HUGE thank you to Victornet, I know how much work it is to upload photos of long dinners, dish-by-dish!

Victornet, these are so useful, thanks for posting!

As for El Bulli, guess what.... I got a reservation!!! U-huuuuuuu!

So I'm flying from Montreal to eat there in September, w a fellow foodie and now we're trying to figure out where to spend the night.

I did read LesleyC's recommendation:

If you haven't already made arrangements, I would thoroughly recommend staying in Cadaqués rather than Roses. Cadaqués for us last year was a delightful small town, full of character, while Roses looked like the worst of the Costa Brava as seen on various TV programmes. The Hotel Playa Sol, while basic, was very comfortable and has a lovely pool area - make sure you ask for a room with balcony on the beach side. The local taxi knows how to find El Bulli and will be waiting for you at the end of your meal if required. You could drive yourself, but the road is ... interesting. Cadaqués is only 5km or so from where Salvador Dali used to live, and there are a number of other Dali sites to visit around the area if you're so inclined.

BUT..... I'm thinking this is too far from Roses. And, frankly, I'm not going there to hang out and enjoy the scenery, I just want a comfortable enough little hotel as close as possible to El BUlli and rafa's.

Suggestions?

Alexandra Forbes

Brazilian food and travel writer, @aleforbes on Twitter

Official Website

Link to post
Share on other sites

My wife and I stayed at the Vistabella, technically in Roses, but not in town proper - it's on a bluff overlooking the sea... we had a beautiful view from our room.... and it was about 2 minutes from the road that leads to El Bulli - probably as close as you can get. It was a little more challenging to get to Rafa's, though really not a big deal. And the front desk has maps with everything labeled on it - so they're set up and ready.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've stayed at the Almadraba Park in Roses twice and its quite nice. It's out of the center of Roses. We went for the superior room this time (an extra 20 or 30 euros) which meant it was overlooking the sea. It was great to hang out on our porch and unwind from the meal over cigars. Excellent breakfast buffet as well.

I think the drive to Cadaques after the meal would be a bit long and that is a very windy road. I'd highly recommend a visit to the Salvador Dali house museum in Port Lligat (the edge of Cadaques) which requires advance reservations as places are limited.

The hotel is fairly private, but you can walk down to this beach in a couple of minutes:

beach.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Amazing images victornet. It's wonderful how sculptural it all is. Kind of like visiting a museum of edible art.

I'm so glad there are such talented people creating such astonishing and intimate works of art.

Wish I could partake...

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...

spain_el_bulli_caviar.jpg

O.K., so.... I can finally say I've had dinner at El Bulli. While I was there, I almost had to pinch myself at times to make sure I wasn't dreaming!

I've come away from the experience changed, in a way. That's how much it impacted me. I tried to transmit what I saw, tasted and felt during the 5-hour long dinner in a video, which I've posted on this link. I really hope it will transport you to that wondrous night, in that wondrous place.

And I also spoke to Ferran at length after dinner, about the huge changes that are in the plans (last service EVER will be on July 31, 2011). I've got a video of that, too, but the chef is speaking in a mix of French and Spanish....

spain_el_bulli_barnac2.jpg

spain_el_bulli_globo.jpg

Alexandra Forbes

Brazilian food and travel writer, @aleforbes on Twitter

Official Website

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

http://www.elbulli.com/reservas/index.php?lang=en

First of all we would like to thank everybody who has shown an interest in visiting us to enjoy the El Bulli experience during these fifty years as a restaurant. Also to all the professionals who have been part of the team and helped make it happen.

On July 30th 2011 El Bulli will have completed its journey as a restaurant. We will transform into a creativity center, opening in 2014. Its main objective is to be a think-tank for creative cuisine and gastronomy and will be manage by a private foundation.

We regret not being able to fulfill any more reservation requests. Demand has immediately exceeded our scarce availability. This has been the case over the last few years and is certainly the most bitter note. It makes us very sad.

The format and structure will be completely different from the current model and, therefore, we regret to announce reservations are now closed.

We believe that this foundation will be a commitment to the cultural future of creative cuisine and we feel that El Bulli can offer the lines of action to attain great objectives in this field.

Due to the demand received and this being the last year for reservations, we must inform you that this message is our last and request no further applications.

"I'll put anything in my mouth twice." -- Ulterior Epicure
Link to post
Share on other sites

http://www.elbulli.com/reservas/index.php?lang=en

First of all we would like to thank everybody who has shown an interest in visiting us to enjoy the El Bulli experience during these fifty years as a restaurant. Also to all the professionals who have been part of the team and helped make it happen.

On July 30th 2011 El Bulli will have completed its journey as a restaurant. We will transform into a creativity center, opening in 2014. Its main objective is to be a think-tank for creative cuisine and gastronomy and will be manage by a private foundation.

We regret not being able to fulfill any more reservation requests. Demand has immediately exceeded our scarce availability. This has been the case over the last few years and is certainly the most bitter note. It makes us very sad.

The format and structure will be completely different from the current model and, therefore, we regret to announce reservations are now closed.

We believe that this foundation will be a commitment to the cultural future of creative cuisine and we feel that El Bulli can offer the lines of action to attain great objectives in this field.

Due to the demand received and this being the last year for reservations, we must inform you that this message is our last and request no further applications.

Thats annoying. I just checked their site last weekend and it said check back later for info about making 2011 res.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Writing about el Bulli proved to be quite the challenge for me. Indeed, I took nearly a year to do so. But I still really wanted to share the story. If you want to check out the photos, they're all HERE. Anyway, hope you enjoy the tale...

Describing every morsel of food I ate at el Bulli, like writing a book report on the Bible, would be one hell of an undertaking. Followers of any faith already know much of the plot. The protagonist is worshipped by some, misunderstood by others. The reservation system involves countless requests but only a chosen few are granted. (Those that think they have “a better chance at seeing God” probably do.) Miracles are performed on food and beverage. Don’t pretend you don’t see the similarities.

Actually since lunch at el Bulli lasted more than six hours, I don’t want it to take you that long to read about it. Instead consider the following timeline:

Tuesday October 14, 2008, 5:25 AM: I sent an innocent email to one Luis García, el Bulli gatekeeper, frequent bearer of bad news. I asked (okay, begged) for a reservation for two people, anytime in 2009. In exchange I may or may not have offered my second- and third-born children. The first-born is, of course, the minimum.

Thursday December 11, 2008, 7:42 AM: My brain hit Caps Lock; all my thoughts came punctuated with exclamation marks. I got exactly the booking I wanted — lunch nearly a full year later, two days before my 25th birthday. Within minutes, friends I never knew I had emerged to claim the other seat. First-, second-, and third-born children were offered to me all at once — a value pack, if you will. I saw a pattern emerging. I wondered if it were legal.

Wednesday May 20, 2009, 3:04 PM: To the delight of few and the consternation of many, a graduate degree was conferred on me by a university I attended primarily due to its proximity to a certain restaurant. That meant the academic research grant I had mainlined to fund my culinary travels was no more. Meanwhile my disenchantment with my would-be profession meant I hadn’t actively looked for a real job. Thus I was barely in a position to dine at el Burger King, much less el Bulli.

Thursday June 18, 2009, 2:10 PM: Still jobless (“building life experiences” as my friend likes to say) but ignorantly unfazed, I thought it the perfect time for a quick food-filled sojourn to New York, the city where I had cut my dining teeth. But after a particularly fine pizza lunch on the day before I was to leave, a cup of gelato introduced me to a particularly fine Sicilian girl, who we’ll call Sirena. I made my vacation a stay-cation. I moved back.

Monday November 9, 2009, 10:00 AM: To the interest of few and the amusement of many, I had pimped my résumé about town to restaurants high and low for months. This was the day someone finally humored me with a paying job, leaving me a one-man NPO no longer. Brashly, I asked permission to take a ten-day vacation to Italy and Spain ten days into my employment. Expected response? Immediate dismissal. Actual response? Enthusiastic high-five.

Saturday November 28, 2009, 1:05 PM: El Bulli’s website warns against using navigation systems to find the restaurant. The all-knowing Google maps can’t even help you. Sirena and I were guided by xuixos — fluffy, flaky little pastries native to Girona but also available, where we had them, in Barcelona. The shrapnel from one was still strewn across my lap as we wound up and down the hills around Roses, the nearest town to el Bulli. Water, land, and air mingled in a warm embrace here. And the restaurant, isolated as it is, isn’t so much guarded by this environment as it is held in its womb. This was all el Bulli — all of it.

Saturday November 28, 2009, 1:28 PM: Camarones. Head-on shrimp were the first of many new foods Sirena would be subjected introduced to that day. After an audience with the king in the kitchen — easily the most intently focused one I’ve ever set foot in — this was the fourth dish of nine that we took on the patio, with a glass of cava and plenty of sunlight. Steamed over green tea, the shrimp were small and sweet, nested among seaweed and sea beans, a bitter and briny counter-weight. Sirena, like a walking, talking guillotine, left me all of the heads. I did not complain.

Saturday November 28, 2009, 2:15 PM: Dramatization. The “Montjoi lentils,” tiny brown buoys in a pool of chicken broth, were like the food in TV commercials — an almost too-perfect version of themselves. Creamy, liquid-filled bursts with all the essential flavor of the legumes but none of the texture that often oscillates between grainy and mushy but rarely in-between. I’d seen this technique of spherification a thousand times before, but never employed so effectively — clearly Adrià had done this once or twice before.

Saturday November 28, 2009: 2:45 PM: AT&T. Sirena held her wine glass out in front of her, just above eye level, considering its contents carefully. A combined look of hope and confusion was on her face, the look of a New Yorker watching their iPhone signal fluctuate. “Pichón?“, she half-whispered, baffled by the disparity between what she heard and what she was seeing. But she had heard right — our Burgundy glasses got an armagnac rinse before the pigeon consommé flew in. An accompanying chocolate leaf came smeared with ganache, powdered with cocoa and orange zest. A revelatory combination, the chocolate bark and the booze seemed to replenish the deeper, darker flavors that had been clarified out of the consommé. These bittersweet bass notes relayed the taste of the internal organs, of November, of game season.

Saturday November 28, 2009: 3:05 PM: CNBC. Looking at the plate, I felt like I was watching the news channel, unable to find the focal point among all the crap scrolling across the top and bottom. Raw cockles. Fresh fennel. Yuzu confit. Green olive. Kimchi. Maple. A potluck at the UN gone horribly, horribly wrong. World War III on a plate — every country was fighting. There was no winner.

Saturday November 28, 2009: 3:21 PM: Vegan nose-to-tail. “Leche de soja con soja” explored the soybean in its many guises: yuba, miso, sprouts, seeds, beans, oil, milk, ice cream, and soy sauce powder. This was an elegant, nuanced dish sandwiched by two that knocked us over the head (those cockles, and a deceptively bitter persimmon salad). Adrià’s symphony is anything but monotonous.

Saturday November 28, 2009: 3:56 PM: Royal flush. Adrià played his strongest hand — wild hare in four services, the most memorable of which was à la royale reworked à la Ferran. Now Sirena is a trooper 99% of the time, but she simply cannot deal with hare brains. (Don’t ask why she still hangs out with me.) And maybe it didn’t help that I had described the animals as “psycho, lawless rabbits” when she asked what they were. Regardless, she politely asked for the brains to be substituted. Expecting a tamer alternative, she got sea cucumber. She was thrilled. My brains, meanwhile came floating in a murky broth. Entrails followed, grilled on a bone skewer, like a cute little hare lollipop. Hare jelly came with sea urchin, but not before the royale, which was somehow even sexier than I’d imagined it would be. The most tender medallions of roasted loin wore chocolate ravioli filled with creamy hare liver and bathed in dark sauce redolent of blood and wine. Just out of control.

Saturday November 28, 2009: 5:07 PM: Thanksgiving tuber. I heard earlier in the year that Ferran Adrià would be playing with white Alba truffles this season, and I was very happy we got to play, too. First they were shaved into a Bordeaux glass, a funky facial to enjoy while we had some parmesan ravioli sprinkled with coffee grounds and accompanied by an exquisite little balsamic caramel. With a surgeon’s precision, a silent waiter used forceps to remove the truffle shavings from our glasses and pile them onto the creamiest sweet potato gnocchi you can imagine. Nearly 4,000 miles from home, we were still able to get our yams for Thanksgiving. Unfortunately now I might not want them any other way.

Saturday November 28, 2009: 5:25 PM: Ice fishing. Just water, brown sugar, green tea powder and mint — a MacGyver dessert if there ever was one. A thin layer of ice was magically suspended over a thick blue glass bowl. We broke through it gingerly at first, ice fishers unsure of what lay beneath. The same motions were made with more gusto once we realized there was nothing. Just this split-second refreshing, almost effervescent chill with every shard of ice we ate.

Saturday November 28, 2009: 5:47 PM: Little Miss Sunshine. Refreshing, sour, cold, crunchy, creamy, sweet, and fresh — that’s what Otoño was. Quite possibly the best dessert I’ve ever had, this citrus miracle seemed to have every taste, temperature, and texture possible. It shined like the sun.

Saturday November 28, 2009: 6:17 PM: Morphings. That’s what they called the monstrous box of chocolates at the end. We attacked it outside on the same patio where we’d started the meal. Seven hours had passed since then. A chill was in the air as we listened to the waves, sipped our coffees, and pounced on the chocolates. There were seventeen different types, each one of them better than the last. If life is like this box of chocolates, life is great.

El Bulli, to me, was not a meal. It was an experience seamlessly reflective of both time and place. After having gone even just this once, the accolades and the acolytes, the fame and the legend all make sense to me now. I get it. Ferran Adrià is an ambassador for Catalonia today. Food is just his metaphor.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Writing about el Bulli proved to be quite the challenge for me. Indeed, I took nearly a year to do so. But I still really wanted to share the story. If you want to check out the photos, they're all HERE. Anyway, hope you enjoy the tale...

Nice to see you back, and what a great eating experience to share with us after such a long absence! I've been wondering what happened to you and your eating adventures (no longer part of A Life Worth Eating?), so it's good to know you're still eating well. :smile:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Writing about el Bulli proved to be quite the challenge for me. Indeed, I took nearly a year to do so. But I still really wanted to share the story. If you want to check out the photos, they're all HERE. Anyway, hope you enjoy the tale...

Nice to see you back, and what a great eating experience to share with us after such a long absence! I've been wondering what happened to you and your eating adventures (no longer part of A Life Worth Eating?), so it's good to know you're still eating well. :smile:

Thanks, Rona! Life for me is still definitely worth eating, I'm just not part of that website anymore. :raz: That's been the case for over a year now, and I won't bother you with the long, messy blog break-up story. I'll just say I'm incredibly happy to be starting a fresh solo venture (with a beautiful girl to keep me company :wink:). I missed writing. And I've got a whole lot still to talk about.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks so much for the description of the meal. I've been twice, both times early in the season, and it is great to read details of how the menu is radically altered by the day, the week, the month, not to mention the season. While I'm despondent about the new announcement that new requests are not being accepted for 2011 (after I respectfully waited for months for the current season to end) I feel nothing but gratitude for the opportunity to have that experience.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 5 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...
  • Similar Content

    • By PedroG
      Olla podrida sous vide
      Origin
      Not rotten pot, but mighty or rich pot! Originated in 16th century Spain, olla poderida became olla podrida and was falsely translated into French as pot-pourri.
      Ingredients
      For two servings
      * 100g Brisket well marbled, cooked SV 48h/55°C, large dice †
      * 100g Pork meat well marbled, cooked SV 24h/55°C, large dice †
      * 100g Lamb chops without bone, cooked SV 4h/55°C, large dice †
      * 100g Chicken breast, cooked SV 2h/58°C, large dice †
      * 100g Chorizo, sliced approximately 4mm †
      * 125g Chickpeas (garbanzos), soaked overnight in water †
      * 1 Onion chopped medium-fine †
      * ½ Savoy cabbage approx. 200g cut into pieces, thick leaf veins removed
      * ½ Celeriac approx. 200g quartered, sliced about 2mm
      * 2 Carrots sliced approximately 120g about 3mm
      * 1 Leek approximately 20cm / 100g sliced about 5mm
      * Extra virgin olive oil
      * Rice bran oil
      * Dried parsley qs, aromatic, black pepper
      † Beef, pork, lamb and chicken (or at least two kinds of meat) as well as chorizo, chickpeas and onions are mandatory ingredients, other vegetables vary according to desire and availability.
      Cooking
      Boil chickpeas in water for 30-60 min.
      Sauté onions in olive oil, add chorizo, continue sautéing, add chickpeas including its cooking water, add remaining vegetables, cover and cook to the desired softness, stir from time to time. If additional liquid is needed, you may add Sherry instead of water.
      Reduce heat. Season to taste. Add parsley.
      In a heavy skillet, sear the meat dice in just smoking hot rice bran oil (very high smoking point allows very quick sear, not overdoing the center of the meat).
      Sear one kind of meat at a time and transfer to the pan with the vegetables.
    • By Chef Hermes Blog
      Warm Onion Bavarois
      * 300g Sweet Onion purée
      * 250g Whole milk
      * 150g Whipping cream
      * 150g Chicken stock (or fresh vegetable nage, not stock cubes)
      * 3.5g Gellan gum
      * Seasoning
      Lightly grease with vegetable oil the moulds you intend to use (darioles, ramekins etc) and set to one side.
      In a pan (but not on the heat), whisk together all the ingredients.
      Place on a medium heat and whisk continuously, the mix will start to thicken slightly. Carry on whisking for a further 3-4 minutes when it has started to bubble. Then quickly pour into the greased moulds & chill.
      To reheat for serving, just place the ramekin in a pan of water and simmer gently for 8-10 mins.
    • By swpeterson
      I have been buying country style bone-in ribs instead of bone-in pork chops. I season them with a rub very similar to Emeril's Rustic Rub spice rub and use a heaping tablespoon a rendered Nueskie's Applewood smoked bacon fat in the Food Saver vacumn bag. We have been using 2 ribs in the bag but have made the decision to switch to one to split. The meat is so rich and flavorful that we can easily split one and enjoy the meal even more.
      For a sauce, I cobbled together a sauce made with the juice of half a valencia orange, the pulp from 1 passion fruit, 1 cup pitted cherries (I used rainiers and bings in this one), 1 tsp Dijon mustard, 1/2 cup white wine, juice from 1 lime, 2 tsp honey, garlic cloves crushed (I used roasted garlic that I keep in the fridge and 'crushed' them in my 'special' coffee grinder(2)) and 1 medium sized shallot. I used the same bacon fat to soften the shallots, then added the rest of the ingredients and let it reduce by about a third and then let it rest and reheated it when the pork ribs were done.
      I kept them in the sous vide at 141 from 10:00 AM until I got home from work at 7:00. It took another half hour +/- to change clothes, pour a glass of wine, reheat the sauce, make a salad, and heat up the garlic bread that I keep prepped in the freezer. After the bread was heated for about 8 minutes, I switched the oven to broil and took the bread out of the oven.
      I have started to experiment with using the broiler element to put color on the proteins that I have cooked in the sous vide. I have placed the oven rack on the third rack from the top, leave the door ajar while I bring the broiler element up to heat. I use my 10" stainless steel saute pan with a stainless steel rack in the pan for the protein. I open the sous vide package and pour the liquid that has accumulated in the bag into the bottom of the pan. I put the ribs, fattest side up on the rack and place the pan in the oven. I leave the door ajar and let them stay in there for 8 mnutes.
      That timing has worked extremely well for both the ribs and the chicken that I have done. I don't flip them yet and that hasn't been necessary for those 2 proteins. (I was much less successful with this formula for the flank steak which I think needs to be closer the heat source for less time).
      At any rate, the broiler is working well for color and the meat and sauce are great. The sauce also works very well with chicken. Haven't tried it yet with the salmon.
      Just wanted to share as I really love this sous vide thing and wanted to share.
      Sorry no photos yet. I haven't figured that part out yet but my husband promises to teach me.
    • By PedroG
      Utilization of meat leftovers from sous-vide cooking
      Sometimes when you buy a nice cut of meat, your eyes are bigger than your and your beloved's stomach. So what to do with the leftovers?
      In Tyrolia (Austria) they make a "Gröstl", in Solothurn (Switzerland) they make a "Gnusch", in the Seftigenamt (a region in the Swiss canton Berne) they make a "Gmüder", and we (Pedro and SWAMBO) make a varying concoct using ideas from all of the three. We call it "Gröstl", but it is not necessarily a typical Tyrolean Gröstl, and it is different each time, and we usually do not top it with a fried egg as they do in Austria.
      Ingredients

      All your meat leftovers
      Onion (compulsory)
      Any hard vegetable (we prefer celery stalks, or zucchini)
      Any salad (iceberg lettuce or endive/chicory or any other salad leaves, may contain carrot julienne)
      Fried potatoes, or alternatively sweetcorn kernels
      Sherry or wine or bouillon or the gravy you preserved from your last LTLT.cooked meat for simmering (I usually prefer Sherry)
      Eventually some cream (or crème fraîche)
      Salt, pepper, parsley, caraway seeds (typical for Tyrolean Gröstl), paprika, condiment (in Switzerland we use "Aromat" by Knorr, which contains sodium chloride, sodium glutamate, lactose, starch, yeast extract, vegetable fats, onions, spices, E552)'
      vegetable oil (I prefer olive oil)




      Mise en place

      cut your meat in small cubes or slices
      cut the onion(s) not too fine (place the first cut below your tongue to avoid tearing during cutting)
      cut the vegetables about 3-4 mm thick
      cut the salads to pieces smaller than 4 cm, distribute on the cutting board and season deliberately
      cut the potatoes to 1 cm cubes
      place 3 heavy skillets with ample oil on the stove

      Cooking

      in skillet 1, stir-fry the onions, add the hard vegetables still stir-frying, add salad, add sufficient liquid (Sherry or wine or bouillon or gravy) for simmering under a cover until soft. If desired, reduce heat and add some cream at the end.
      in skillet 2, stir-fry the potatoes until soft (in case of sweetcorn kernels, add to skillet 1 after stir-frying and use skillet 2 for skillet 3)
      in skillet 3, as soon as the vegetables and the potatoes are soft, sear the meat in just smoking oil for 30-60 seconds, then add to skillet 1

      Serving
      You may mix the potatoes with the vegetables and meat to make a rather typical Gröstl, or serve the fried potatoes separately; we prefer the latter, as the potatoes stay more crunchy.
      Do not forget to serve a glass of good dry red wine!
    • By PedroG
      Brisket „Stroganoff“ Sous Vide With Mixed Mushrooms

      Ingredients for 2 servings
      about 400g well marbled Brisket
      3 tablespoons rice bran oil or other high smoke point oil (grapeseed oil)
      3 tablespoons extravirgin olive oil
      3 tablespoons Cognac (brandy)
      2 small onions, finely diced
      ½ yellow or red bell peppers cut into strips
      90 g mixed mushrooms
      100 ml of gravy from last Brisket (or concentrated stock)
      1 teaspoon mustard, Dijon type
      1 teaspoon paprika mild (not spicy!)
      1 medium pickled cucumber cut into thin strips
      2 tablespoons parsley, finely chopped
      approx. 120g sour cream with herbs
      Sous Vide - cooking
      Marinate brisket with Mexican style (medium hot) marinade in the vacuum bag for at least 3 days at 1 ° C, cook sous vide 48 hours at 55.0 ° C.
      Preparing the sauce
      At a moderate heat sauté onions in olive oil, add peppers (preblanched in the microwave oven for 2-3 minutes) and mushroom mixture, stir-fry, remove from heat and add the gravy. Add pickled cucumber, pepper, mustard and cognac. Put on very low heat, add sour cream and keep warm, but do not boil as the cream will separate. Remove the brisket from the bag, cut into strips (about 8x10x35mm), sear very quickly in smoking-hot rice bran oil, add the meat and the parsley to the sauce.
      Serving
      Serve on warmed plates. Typically served with spätzle (south German) or chnöpfli (Swiss).
      And don't forget a glass of good red wine!
      Enjoy your meal!
      Pedro

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...