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Getting Burnt Smell out of Microwave


VivreManger
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A few weeks ago someone left a piece of bread in the microwave too long and it got burnt. The bread is long gone, but the smell still lingers.

I have washed the stove down with soap and baking soda, but the smell is still strong. My wife thinks that the oven is now toxic, but she never liked it in the first place. I put it out in the back porch with the door open and the smell persists. I put a plastic container of baking soda in the microwave and shut the door, but it seems to make no difference.

Any suggestions??

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I'd try heating some white vinegar in the thing and if that fails, some coffee beans in some water? Both vinegar and coffee beans are suppose to be good deodorizers. The baking soda is passive and could take a few days or more to work. I would think the boiling coffee beans or vinegar would involve more volatility (if that's the word) since you heat it and the vapors permeate the open oven space and it nooks and cranies.

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My ex reheated some particularly nasty smelling curry in ours and a measuring cup of water/vinegar simmered low and long....5 minutes, half power...something like that... worked really well. It also had the extra benefit of making it super-easy to wipe out. Now I do it whenever I need to clean it.

“Don't kid yourself, Jimmy. If a cow ever got the chance, he'd eat you and everyone you care about!”
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We had used a vinegar solution to wash it, but this seems much more effective. Though I should add that burnt bread is more powerful and pervasive than any curry I have ever smelt.

Would you suggest a half-vinegar half-water solution?

Edited by VivreManger (log)
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I'm sorry, I don't remember the exact proportions. Probably a half of a 2c measuring cup and a couple glubs of vinegar, then simmered. Most of the time I let it sit till it's cool enough to touch and then dip a clean kitchen rag in the measuring cup, and start wiping the inside.

“Don't kid yourself, Jimmy. If a cow ever got the chance, he'd eat you and everyone you care about!”
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We went the vinegar route after someone burnt popcorn in the microwave, but the only thing that really got rid of the burnt popcorn odor was when we cooked bacon in the microwave! The bacon odor was pretty pervasive but at least it smells better than burnt popcorn. :hmmm:

SuzySushi

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I wouldn't buy a whole bag just for this, but if you have any charcoal or charcoal briquettes sitting around, you could try leaving a tray of them in the microwave for a few days and see (well, smell) what happens.

"There is no sincerer love than the love of food."  -George Bernard Shaw, Man and Superman, Act 1

 

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I wouldn't buy a whole bag just for this, but if you have any charcoal or charcoal briquettes sitting around, you could try leaving a tray of them in the microwave for a few days and see (well, smell) what happens.

I will try vinegar solution first then charcoal. I don't use briquets, but I do have some hardwood charcoal, just waiting for the snow to melt.

I should add that my earlier experiments included warming up a baked apple. It helped with the kitchen smells, but not the mocrowave.

Edited by VivreManger (log)
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