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Bread machine recs?


foodgeek
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I'm thinking of getting a bread machine as a gift fpr someone who can't eat wheat., and buys a lot of spelt bread. I would aso get her Bette Hagman's (Hageman?) gluten free baking book with it since it has many gluten recipes including blends.

What features, models, or brands do u recommend in a bread machine? Anyone used one for gluten free recipes? Any suggestions along those lines?

Thanks

-Jason

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I'll  give you my bread machine....you'll use it once and then maybe once after that...

LOL. I was afriad that I wouldn't be taken seriously if I asked about bread machines.

Are the results that bad? The point is that since she is limited to non-wheat options....it may be better for her to be able to experiment with making different breads. If any of it comes out well...she will continue to use the machine. She can even make loaves and freeze them...which has to be better than the frozen seplt bread sold in stores.

-Jason

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I use the westbend bread machine. I have a friend who has a son who is wheat and gluten sensitive and we both use spelt all the time. It comes out great in a bread machine. Just cut back by about an ounce on any water or milk you use.

Another option for flour is a flour called or made by Hockley Valley. I can get it here in Ontario, but I couldn't swear to other places!

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I use the westbend bread machine.  I have a friend who has a son who is wheat and gluten sensitive and we both use spelt all the time.  It comes out great in a bread machine.  Just cut back by about an ounce on any water or milk you use.

Another option for flour is a flour called or made by Hockley Valley.  I can get it here in Ontario, but I couldn't swear to other places!

Thanks for the response. :)

Are these resipes where u have substituted spelt for wheat, or are they spelt recipes?

I'm thinking that since "The Gluten-Free Gourmet Bakes Bread : More Than 200 Wheat Free Recipes" has bread machine instructions that reducing the moisture may not be necesary. I'm gonna give ehr the book with the machine. I'll definitely pass the flour rec along. Is it a blended flour (spelt, tapioca, rice etc...), or just spelt?

-Jason

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I use the westbend bread machine.

You have the West Bend 41077 Just For Dinner?

Its fast, but produces a small loaf, right? Hmmm. I'm thinking taht something that produces normal sized loafs might be better. Maybe I should ask her what she would prefer (although I did want it to be a semi-surprise.)

-Jason

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The recipes that I reduce the water in are recipes that I am substituting spelt for regular flour. I will get more info on the Hockley Valley flour and let you know!

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I use the westbend bread machine.

You have the West Bend 41077 Just For Dinner?

Its fast, but produces a small loaf, right? Hmmm. I'm thinking taht something that produces normal sized loafs might be better. Maybe I should ask her what she would prefer (although I did want it to be a semi-surprise.)

Actually, I have both West bends. The just for dinner and the large breadmaker as well. I use the small machine when it is just us, and I don't have to worry about allergies, and the large machine when making gluten free bread or dough. I love them both. I tried a black and decker bread machine but went back to the Westbend.

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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I’ve seen quite a few positive write-up’s for the Zojirushi machine.

"King Arthur Flour" carries it for about $150, although I imagine it's available from other sources as well.

King Arthur also has a large selection of flours, some of which may fulfill your special needs.

--------------

Bob Bowen

aka Huevos del Toro

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I’ve seen quite a few positive write-up’s for the Zojirushi machine.

The Zojirushi machines are generally well regarded. You should try the Bread Bakers mailing list (link points to their searchable archive).

Good use for a bread machine: have it knead and proof the dough, then shape it and bake it in a regular oven.

- S

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The recipes that I reduce the water in are recipes that I am substituting spelt for regular flour.  I will get more info on the Hockley Valley flour and let you know!

I tracked the Hockley Valley flour down. It is spelt. Thanks. :)

-Jason

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I’ve seen quite a few positive write-up’s for the Zojirushi machine.

The Zojirushi machines are generally well regarded. You should try the Bread Bakers mailing list (link points to their searchable archive).

Good use for a bread machine: have it knead and proof the dough, then shape it and bake it in a regular oven.

- S

Thanks guys. I'll tale a look at the Zojirushi machines.

Huevos,

I'll Check out King Artur.

Fish,

I'll check that link out. :) Yes, I had tought of baking in a regular oven...since many of the reviews i read complained about the shape. This is especially true of the verticle machines. I wonder why they make them that way.

-Jason

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  • 2 months later...

Thanks for all the help guys. I wound up getting her a Breadman 2200 and the Gluten-free baking book. She has made 2 loaves of spelt bread so far. The first one (as I had been warned) was a little chemical. The second loaf was great, and she is happy with the machine. :)

-Jason

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This may be helpful overall.

I have been advised by good authority that "Buckwheat" is gluten free.

I read the labels on several packages at my suppliers and they were emphatic about this fact. So good news. If you find this is not true please pass the word back to me so I may correct my notes. This involves health, it is very important. Later and good luck.

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  • 1 month later...

Hi there,

I am a classically trained in the field but have found myself working solo in a kitchen that provides gluten free, dairy free, wheat free, vegetarian food of all types. I have also found myself doing alot of baking with flours I have never used before including spelt, which until recently would elicite swearing from me every time I used it. I agree with the reduction of moisture which does work. I am not entirely enthusiastic about spelt bread but am a fan of the bread machine. I would use it to knead the dough only. A standing mixer gets very hot when kneading bread and I think I would break down and cry if my kitchen aid broke. Kamut flour makes great bread by the way. I personally could use a good spelt shortbread recipe and any vegan baking recipes people have. My new work enviroment is a great challenge to me. Thanx

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