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My first attempt at making Stromboli


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Last night I attempted making Stromboli. I followed the recipe below for the dough and filling. I forgot to put the basil and oregano (it was sitting right next to me). I used my own sauce. I did add a little sauce in the Stromboli. The Stromboli that leaked a lot of cheese was wrapped like the instructions. The one with only a small leak was wrapped at how I thought it should be. Next time I need to work on the wrapping. Over all they tasted really good.

They were baked on a stone.

I'll be eating the second one tonight.

http://www.pizzamaniac.com/index.php/archi...ssic-stromboli/

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Those look really good, I love stromboli. You even make your own dough, I might steal the recipe... Generally I get dough from my pizza place. I make them a lot, for finger food, unexpected company, lazy Sunday dinner, stuff like that. The family seems to like them better than homemade pizza. The leftovers are incredible, too (when we -have- leftovers...which is extremely rare).

My favorite filling is one very similar to yours, only I add salami and I never put sauce. I prefer sauce on the side, for dipping. Sliced cooked Italian sausage and deeply carmelized peppers and onions is one REALLY good combo, too layered with provolone. Another great filling is diced lightly steamed broccoli, diced turkey lunch meat, or ham, cheddar, jack or a mix, and a bare drizzle of caesar dressing, wrapped.

The sky's the limit, really.

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To my knowledge, I've never had a stromboli. But I'm intrigued.

Would someone care to enlighten me about the differences between a stromboli and calzone (which I've had)? Googling seems to suggest that the difference is mainly in the fillings and the shape. Are there any other differences, such as the dough? And is it an Italian-American invention?

Please, teach me the ways of stromboli. :biggrin:

Edited by sanrensho (log)
Baker of "impaired" cakes...
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i have always understood stromboli to have a much lighter filling than calzone; like herbs, say a few strands of salami, and just a bit of cheese. If your filling is too wet it will be difficult for the inner layers of dough to bake through.

"Godspeed all the bakers at dawn... may they all cut their thumbs and bleed into their buns til they melt away..."

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The best stromboli and calzone I've had are at a place in Hackensack, New Jersey. It's called Brooklyn's Brick Oven Pizza and is operated by the nephews of Patsy Grimaldi of Grimaldi's (Brooklyn) fame. At this place in New Jersey, they use the same dough for pizza, stromboli and calzone. The differences are mostly stylistic: for pizza the dough is stretched into a disc and the toppings go on top; for calzone the dough is also stretched into a disc but the fillings go on half and then the disc is folded into a half-moon shape; for stromboli the dough is stretched into a rectangle, which is rolled around the fillings. Calzone fillings tend to be ricotta and mozzarella cheeses plus whatever meats and vegetables are requested; stromboli fillings tend to be just mozzarella cheese plus various meats and red bell peppers.

P.S. If you've ever had Hot Pockets you've had something akin to stromboli.

Steven A. Shaw aka "Fat Guy"
Co-founder, Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, sshaw@egstaff.org
Proud signatory to the eG Ethics code
Director, New Media Studies, International Culinary Center (take my food-blogging course)

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My hubby makes stromboli with a french baguette. He slices the baguette into two, slathers one slice with pizza sauce then topped with pepperoni slices and mozarella cheese. The them puts the other half of the sandwich on top and slathers the whole sandwich with melted butter then wrap the whole thing up with aluminum wrap. The whole thing goes into the oven and toasted until the cheese melts. The baguette is then cut at angle to serve as sandwiches for two.

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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What's not healthy? They've got meat, salt, fat, dairy, starch....a little alcohol and/or chocolate, and they'd be a perfect food.

Now you have me thinking about a chocolate version...

As far as healthy...I throw about half a cup of broccoli in one of mine, that's practically a salad!

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I too am a little confused about the difference between stromboli & calzones, but since I got mixed up with the Artisan Bread thread in the Pastry and Baking forum, I've been making spinach & ricotta calzones about once a week & we have been enjoying them immensely. This used to seem like such a daunting project, but having the aforementioned dough on hand, it's been a snap to put one together after work. Our tummies are happy but our waistbands are in danger of expanding.

pat

I would live all my life in nonchalance and insouciance

Were it not for making a living, which is rather a nouciance.

-- Ogden Nash

http://bluestembooks.com/

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I'm no pro, but as far as I know, Calzones are mostly ricotta and mozzarella, sometimes with a bit of ham or pepperoni, and sauce on the side. Around here, calzones are huge half-moon pillows stuffed with cheese. Stromboli are usually either a single (or double) serving or a whole pizza-type crust rolled, filled with mozzarella and or provolone, generously stuffed with pizza type toppings, then baked. They come long, like a fat baguette, or curved into a horseshoe shape.

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