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Michelin Guide Tokyo 2008


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Just wondering if anyone has any information on the names of the 3 star and 2 star. I'm really interested to see if RYU Gin gets 2 or 3.

Also if anyone has any info on RYU Gin or Tapas molecular bar I would love to hear anything about them.

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I'd really love to hear the local's opinion on this. I don't hold Michelin's food guides in high regard outside of Europe. Does Tokyo win because it simply has exponentially more people, 35 million, and all of Tokyo's visitors? Is this guide good or just a guide to how to waste money while in Tokyo? Dying to hear.

That is the population of the Kanto Plane, isn't it? The population of Tokyo's 23 wards is much smaller, about 8.6 million, and the guide talks about retaurants in those 23 wards.

I'm not qualified to talk about the guide, but I think it has succeeded in getting a lot of attention of the Japanese people. As you may know, the Japanese like to listen to what "gaijin" have to say.

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Generally it refers to furnishings, service, cleanliness, atmosphere, price, and value for money.

Apparently it's very unusual for a three-star restaurant to get only one fork, as Sukiyabashi Jiro and Sushi Mizutani did.

Can someone explain what the category of comfort means?

Edited by thelobster (log)
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I'd really love to hear the local's opinion on this. I don't hold Michelin's food guides in high regard outside of Europe. Does Tokyo win because it simply has exponentially more people, 35 million, and all of Tokyo's visitors? Is this guide good or just a guide to how to waste money while in Tokyo? Dying to hear.

That is the population of the Kanto Plane, isn't it? The population of Tokyo's 23 wards is much smaller, about 8.6 million, and the guide talks about retaurants in those 23 wards.

I'm not qualified to talk about the guide, but I think it has succeeded in getting a lot of attention of the Japanese people. As you may know, the Japanese like to listen to what "gaijin" have to say.

Thanks for the correction. 35 Million is Kanto, yeah. Probably 40 million now. 8.6 million is Tokyo's population. 8.25 is NY's population. I'd argue that FAR more people commute into Tokyo than NYC, and that Tokyo is much further developed than NYC's 5 boroughs, but still, Tokyo kicked NY's ass apparently...

I still think you will find a much wider variety of INTERNATIONAL food in NYC, but lord knows I miss Tokyo for having so many goddamn excellent restaurants. Watch out guys, I'm moving back.

You guys will enjoy this:

http://nymag.com/daily/food/2007/11/how_to...michelin_c.html

I disagree with the author's contention that good food must be expensive.

I don't care if you're "qualified" to talk about the guide - what do the locals think? is what I still want to know.

I don't think a bunch of French gourmands are "qualified" to judge Japanese food - but there they went.

I should publish my own guide!

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I'd really love to hear the local's opinion on this. I don't hold Michelin's food guides in high regard outside of Europe. Does Tokyo win because it simply has exponentially more people, 35 million, and all of Tokyo's visitors? Is this guide good or just a guide to how to waste money while in Tokyo? Dying to hear.

That is the population of the Kanto Plane, isn't it? The population of Tokyo's 23 wards is much smaller, about 8.6 million, and the guide talks about retaurants in those 23 wards.

I'm not qualified to talk about the guide, but I think it has succeeded in getting a lot of attention of the Japanese people. As you may know, the Japanese like to listen to what "gaijin" have to say.

Thanks for the correction. 35 Million is Kanto, yeah. Probably 40 million now. 8.6 million is Tokyo's population. 8.25 is NY's population. I'd argue that FAR more people commute into Tokyo than NYC, and that Tokyo is much further developed than NYC's 5 boroughs, but still, Tokyo kicked NY's ass apparently...

I still think you will find a much wider variety of INTERNATIONAL food in NYC, but lord knows I miss Tokyo for having so many goddamn excellent restaurants. Watch out guys, I'm moving back.

You guys will enjoy this:

http://nymag.com/daily/food/2007/11/how_to...michelin_c.html

I disagree with the author's contention that good food must be expensive.

I don't care if you're "qualified" to talk about the guide - what do the locals think? is what I still want to know.

I don't think a bunch of French gourmands are "qualified" to judge Japanese food - but there they went.

I should publish my own guide!

Do you remember that there are class A, B, C, and even S gourmets, like I mentioned here? :biggrin:

Edited to add a smilie at the end.

Edited by Hiroyuki (log)
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I know very little about restaurants in Japan, but what are the ones labeled "Japanese fugu", like Tsukiji Yamamoto and Usukifugu Yamadaya? Do they only serve fugu?

Do you remember that there are class A, B, C, and even S gourmets, like I mentioned here? :biggrin:

Haha, I had forgotten all about that.

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I know very little about restaurants in Japan, but what are the ones labeled "Japanese fugu", like Tsukiji Yamamoto and Usukifugu Yamadaya? Do they only serve fugu?
Do you remember that there are class A, B, C, and even S gourmets, like I mentioned here? :biggrin:

Haha, I had forgotten all about that.

Yes, they do. I found the site of the former:

http://www8.plala.or.jp/tsukijiyamamoto/YAM99.htm

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Just a general question

When one eats in Japan, particularly Tokyo, does he/she need to tips? If yes, how many %?

Is it more like in America where the tip is never included, the guest needs to add himself or more like in Europe (the price tag of the meal already include both tax and tips) or HK/Sin (the restaurant will add 10% service tag)? Thanks

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Just a general question

When one eats in Japan, particularly Tokyo, does he/she need to tips? If yes, how many %?

Is it more like in America where the tip is never included, the guest needs to add himself or more like in Europe (the price tag of the meal already include both tax and tips) or HK/Sin (the restaurant will add 10% service tag)? Thanks

You never tip in Japan. Even if you think the service is outstanding, and you really want to tip, don't. Don't even tip the cleaning staff at your hotel or the taxi driver.

Some restaurants (hotel restaurants and higher-level kaiseki places, for example) might have service charges included in their prices, but there is no need to add anything above what is on the bill.

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  • 1 month later...

What would be Japan's (or Tokyo's in particular) most "reliable" dining guide that would be equivalent to let's say: Mobil 5* or NYT 4* in the US and NY respectively? Any website/info about it as well ...

I was lucky enough to dine in some restaurants in Tokyo this winter. I tried a few mentioned by the new Michelin-guide, personally I think that their ratings compared my experiences ate there are about "right" or good-enough. I would post some of my reviews starting sometimes next week hopefully

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The guide mentioned in Torakris' link, Tokyo ii mise umai mise, is the best all around guide as far as I can see, but it is only in Japanese. It covers a lot more ground than the Michelin guide and not just super high end stuff, it is very dependable. I think Michelin did a pretty fair job, they are just a little thin and wasted a lot of space on teppan cooking and fugu.

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Thanks for the feedback

May I know what the link is? Or to make it short ... Currently, Michelin bestows 8 establishments with its highest accolade. What restaurants did receive the best ratings according to Tokyo Ii Mise Umai Mise?

Outside Tokyo, what other places are the main destinations for foodies in Japan? Is it Kyoto or ... I'm looking for the capital of gastronomy in Japan outside the capital city (similar to Lyon in France or Tuscany in Italy).

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  • 3 weeks later...

Outside Tokyo, what other places are the main destinations for foodies in Japan? Is it Kyoto or ... I'm looking for the capital of gastronomy in Japan outside the capital city (similar to Lyon in France or Tuscany in Italy).

It's gotta be Osaka. Give Kahala (8-seater fusion kaseiki) a try the next time you're in Osaka. Endo for Sushi and Ron for Teppan-yaki.

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Osaka is probably far more food-obsessed than Tokyo. Kyoto is probably more important from the "haute cuisine" perspective than Osaka, but Osaka is certainly more indulgent.

Also there are areas with regional specialties that aren't necessarily fancy but have some kind of notable following, like Fukuoka for its milky-white tonkotsu ramen broth, Nagano for oyaki (grilled stuffed buns, for lack of a better description), Hiroshima for negi-yaki and "the other kind of okonomiyaki", etc.), Hokkaido for various lamb specialties. Perhaps less cult-inducing, but still local distinctions, are things like godoufu in Arita and houba miso in Takayama, Noppei stew in Niigata, various western-influenced foods in Aomori.

Edited by JasonTrue (log)

Jason Truesdell

Blog: Pursuing My Passions

Take me to your ryokan, please

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Thanks for the feedback

May I know what the link is? Or to make it short ... Currently, Michelin bestows 8 establishments with its highest accolade. What restaurants did receive the best ratings according to Tokyo Ii Mise Umai Mise?

I too am really interested in the answer to this question if anyone would volunteer. I am keen to understand which restaurants are regarded by both Michelin and Tokyo Ii Mise Umai Mise as the best in Tokyo. I am visiting late March/early April and am finding all the info overwhelming especially as that website doesn't have an English translation.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I just read an article which reiterates the displeasure many Japanese chefs (even some who were awarded stars) have about the Michelin guide. Interestingly (to me), one chef pointed out that the guide goes somewhat against cultural norms "against bragging and putting others down."

That same chef declined to be listed in the guide, as did a few others, the article points out.

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I just read an article which reiterates the displeasure many Japanese chefs (even some who were awarded stars) have about the Michelin guide.  Interestingly (to me), one chef pointed out that the guide goes somewhat against cultural norms "against bragging and putting others down."

That same chef declined to be listed in the guide, as did a few others, the article points out.

saw the ny times article as well... wondering where i can get my hands on the goethe magazine that offered alternative listings!

best english translated guide, anyone?

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