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ann

Wine Buying in Portugal and Spain

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We leave at the end of September for 4 weeks in Portugal (okay, 26 nights to be exact), and I'd first like to thank Miguel, Chloe, Eric, Fred, and all the others whose posts have provided me with a wealth of information about food and restaurants in Portugal. I've also learned that Portugal is the home of some very good but under-appreciated wines like those of Joao Portugal Ramos's winery near Estremoz. I've read Wine Spectator's recent article on the reds from the Duoro, but I'd love to get some suggestions for other parts of Portugal. Thanks in advance.

PS Any restaurant recommendations in Viana do Castelo and Evora would also be very welcome. I have a list but no personal recommendations.


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You'll be here for the vindimas, Ann - always a merry time.

Although Portugal is a small country, its wines are very varied and some of the best new reds and whites come from single producers outside the more traditional regions.

This article by Jancis Robinson lists the current favourites and her 2000 book on Portuguese wines is easily available here, though I warn you they are judged very severely according to classic French tastes - a good thing in my book, but most wine producers and buffs bristle at the very mention of her name.

In general, I'd advise you to just go with the flow and entirely trust the wine waiter or the head waiter, so long as you specify that you want what the Portuguese customers order when it's their birthday (it's a good strategy to say it's your birthday every day). They'll never be too expensive - check the wine-list after he's made his recommendation - as the mark-up here is only about 100% - double what it would cost in a shop.

Another good tactic is to look around and find a table with middle-aged, overweight, prosperous-looking men with big appetites and a lot of time on their hands and order whatever they're having, as they don't mess about. Yuppies or intellectual types (at least over 30) who fret a long time over the wine list and seem disappointed that their favourites aren't on it (or, more commonly, the vintage they wanted) are also a sure bet.

All Portuguese are intensely proud of their wines and will go out of their way to provide you with a (sometimes long-winded) distillation of their oenological life-experience. Your main danger isn't being served bad wine - it's being bored by over-eager strangers worried that you might not choose the very best available and, typically, starting fierce arguments among tables, with the owner thrown in, lamenting the unbearable trendiness of his customers.

We drink more wine and alcohol than any other nation on earth so, unless you're poverty-stricken, everyone you'll meet will have a suggestion - and it'll be trustworthy, as it's a question of honour. Wine is almost always had with food, in large quantities, so food-pairing is theoretically important. But, in practice, people just keep ordering the wine they like best.

The very best of the wine guides (the 2004/2005 edition comes out next week) is, in my opinion, João Paulo Martins. It's in Portuguese but go by the stars. His rating is spot-on. Don't, however, take his book to restaurants. Critics are universally patronised and even pitied, specially because they do tend to like the more expensive wines and everybody enjoys finding great wines at bargain prices. So you'll miss out on that wine which is exclusive to the restaurant (and really is!), as a special favour, because the producer is such a good friend (which he will be): people do not lie about wine in Portugal.

In short: you'll have no problem at all.

Enjoy your stay - 4 weeks are enough to get a well-rounded picture!

Miguel

P.S. In Viana do Castelo, ask a few passers-by and you can't go wrong as the food there (and around) is superb. In Évora, there are quite a few well-rated restaurants I hate, but there's one which many consider to be the best in Portugal. I've been going there for over 30 years and it's just absolutely perfect in every respect: it's called Fialho and, if you heed one word of my advice, do not be tempted to eat anywhere else while you're in Évora. Each meal will be like a different restaurant. And the wine, well...!

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Any restaurant recommendations in Viana do Castelo and Evora would also be very welcome.  I have a list but no personal recommendations.

Miguel is, of course, right about O Fialho in Évora--if you're going to be there, you must try it, no question. Although, I must admit that I was not completely enchanted.... in fact, I enjoyed much more a meal I had in a more typical, working-class joint off the main square. Naturally, I can't remember the name of the place. This is not to detract from the very high quality that O Fialho is known for--it's more a reflection of my taste in restaurants.

I'm so glad you're going to Viana do Castelo--I find that place utterly charming. The last time I was there, the consensus was that one of the best bets in town for a good meal was Os Três Potes (it's pretty easy to find in the old part of town--Beco dos Fornos, 7, closed Mondays). I had some really spectacular rojões there, along with, if memory serves, excellent papas de sarrabulho (for you pig's-blood lovers out there!).


My restaurant blog: Mahlzeit!

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Thank you both - again! A birthday every day for a month - I hadn't thought of that, Miguel. And Eric, could the "joint" in Évora possibly be O Antão?

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Miguel, another great strategy I'll have to remember to employ!


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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Thank you both - again!  A birthday every day for a month - I hadn't thought of that, Miguel.  And Eric, could the "joint" in Évora possibly be O Antão?

My curiosity finally got the better of me, so I dug up an on-line map of Évora to see if it was indeed O Antão.....since I vaguely remember the location of my mystery restaurant (not even a restaurant, more like an adega....anyway, quite informal) I can state with certainty at least that i was not O Antão.

From a list of restaurants, judging by addresses, some possibilities might be A Choupana, Café Alentejo, or O Forcado. But like I said, I really don't remember. I guess a return trip is in order....


My restaurant blog: Mahlzeit!

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I definitely think that it's time for you to return, Eric. And I'll let you know whether you should go to A Choupana. A post in another forum described it as a

"great find!" - a very local, very small dining room with excellent food. Since we'll be in Évora 4 nights, we'll have time to try both it and Fialho.

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In all the most recent posts visited on eGullet, there is no mention about the wines of Spain and how the diner's use of wine enhances or diminish's the dining experience. Could we address this issue? I would welcome hearing what everyone has to say. THis means that we address both the menu of the restaurant and the wines available to the diner. Respectfully, J Gebhart

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I'm sure there is plenty of useful information and opinion about this subject on the Wine board, Judith. We're encouraged to stick to food on this one.


Victor de la Serna

elmundovino

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In all the most recent posts visited on eGullet, there is no mention about the wines of Spain and how the diner's use of wine enhances or diminish's the dining experience. Could we address this issue? I would welcome hearing what everyone has to say. THis means that we address both the menu of the restaurant and the wines available to the diner. Respectfully, J Gebhart

I think this is a potentially interesting topic, expecially given the rise of the avant-garde, which potentially makes wine pairings more difficult. I must say though that during my most recent trip to Spain in which I dined at a number of top restaurants including Arzak, Can Fabes, Sant Pau and Abac, the wine pairings (all Spanish wines) were all superb.

Judith, did you have any particular thoughts on the matter yourself?


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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In all the most recent posts visited on eGullet, there is no mention about the wines of Spain and how the diner's use of wine enhances or diminish's the dining experience. Could we address this issue? I would welcome hearing what everyone has to say. THis means that we address both the menu of the restaurant and the wines available to the diner. Respectfully, J Gebhart

I think this is a potentially interesting topic, expecially given the rise of the avant-garde, which potentially makes wine pairings more difficult. I must say though that during my most recent trip to Spain in which I dined at a number of top restaurants including Arzak, Can Fabes, Sant Pau and Abac, the wine pairings (all Spanish wines) were all superb.

Judith, did you have any particular thoughts on the matter yourself?

Well...yes I do. We have found that if we restrict our wine choices to Spanish only, we have only a few excellent whites and many excellent reds. We also rarely know the various ingredients no less the preparation of the dishes in the tasting menu. This can make wine choices difficult. Not every chef offers a pairing of wines with the dishes provided. And..in many cases when a pairing is offered, they are often not to our liking. In many instances pairing the wine with the food is a daunting, if not an impossible task. We often scrap the effort to match the wine with the food. We choose the red we find most exciting or the white and proceed with the meal.

We are also aware that some of the sommelier's have wine preferences that exclude some of the newer, more robust reds from Toro, Somontano or Bierzo. They instead urge the diner to try the more traditional Spanish reds. Fortunately, we haven't encountered this in our more recent travels. By the way, I didn't realize that this forum excluded the discussion of wine. I hadn't thought to check out the wine forum. JGebhart

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By the way, I didn't realize that this forum excluded the discussion of wine. I hadn't thought to check out the wine forum. JGebhart

It certainly doesn't exclude it, so long as it is discussed in the context of the cuisine or tourism. If the discussion is solely about the wine than it should go in that forum, which is another potential source for discussion on Spanish wines.

It is preciesely because I don't necessarily know what to expect from the food in Spain today that I generally will defer to the sommalier at some of the finer restaurants. I haven't been disappointed, especially when I match glasses to the courses rather than bottles. Of course my last trip this was all arranged ahead to great effect.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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We are also aware that some of the sommelier's have wine preferences that exclude some of the newer, more robust reds from Toro, Somontano or Bierzo. They instead urge the diner to try the more traditional Spanish reds. Fortunately, we haven't encountered this in our more recent travels.

I would never put Bierzo or Somontano in the "robust" category myself - more in the "Atlantic-influenced" category. "Robust" would indeed apply to Toro - and to Jumilla, Yecla, Montsant, Terra Alta, Campo de Borja, Calatayud.

Fortunately, I can assure you that there is no longer a single sommelier in a serious foodie restaurant in Spain today that would urge the diner to drink "traditional reds" only.

There are fewer interesting whites than reds in Spain, yes - but still enough of them to accompany fish and fowl well.

PS I've been prodded in a couple of cases to move wine-related discussions to the wine board, which is why I mentioned this here. But I must also confess that I'm not really up-to-date on that board's discussions.


Victor de la Serna

elmundovino

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We are also aware that some of the sommelier's have wine preferences that exclude some of the newer, more robust reds from Toro, Somontano or Bierzo. They instead urge the diner to try the more traditional Spanish reds. Fortunately, we haven't encountered this in our more recent travels.

I would never put Bierzo or Somontano in the "robust" category myself - more in the "Atlantic-influenced" category. "Robust" would indeed apply to Toro - and to Jumilla, Yecla, Montsant, Terra Alta, Campo de Borja, Calatayud.

Fortunately, I can assure you that there is no longer a single sommelier in a serious foodie restaurant in Spain today that would urge the diner to drink "traditional reds" only.

There are fewer interesting whites than reds in Spain, yes - but still enough of them to accompany fish and fowl well.

PS I've been prodded in a couple of cases to move wine-related discussions to the wine board, which is why I mentioned this here. But I must also confess that I'm not really up-to-date on that board's discussions.

Thanks vserna. You are very correct about Spanish wines in general. I would argue that your comments do not apply, IMO, to the Somotano wines, like Blecqua, a wine from Vinos del Vero. This winery also has, IMO, one of Spains's finest whites: Clarion. This was the white wine served at the recent wedding of Juan Carlos' son.

I was ticking off newer Spanish growing areas in my original post. I was careless in identifying which are robust, or full-bodied and which are not. Vega Sicilia has a new wine Pintia, 2001 which is in the Toro area. It is a robust wine, albeit rather young. This is also a recent release. There is also a new release which is full-bodied or in my terms, robust, from Somontano, the Secastilla, a 2001 Vinos del Vero in a less pricey category than Blecqua.

Enate at the top end of the line is a full- bodied wine. As you know it is also from the Somotano area.

Maybe our differences are semantic only, but maybe not. I find the younger sommelier's of late very well educated in their wine selections. I find some of them less supporters of the Spanish wines and more supporters of the French. In some cases, the wine list includes great French and great Spanish, but the truth is for white wines, the Spanish are far more limited in choice than the French. Hopefully the Spanish will try to address this issue. J Gebhart

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the truth is for white wines, the Spanish are far more limited in choice than the French. Hopefully the Spanish will try to address this issue.

It's a matter of looking at the map, Judith. Spain is where it is. The viticultural areas in this country enjoy, overall, the most hours of sunshine and the highest daytime temperature averages in the world - Australia included. This makes a large majority of those areas ill-equipped to produce top-notch white wines, which need a temperate or even cool environment to preserve delicacy and subtlety. Rheingau, Loire, Friuli or Côte-de-Beaune this ain't. And that is not going to change. Add global warming, and it may even get more pronounced.

We do have some very interesting areas - the Galician northwest, the high plateau of Rueda, some cool high-altitude sites in Navarre and Catalonia. And we can probably do better in some other, warmer areas that are conducive to fat, garrigue-infused, spicy powerful whites in the mold of the Rhône valley. But these will never be market-dominating styles, but rather niche wines for a specific set of dishes - something like well-aged Hermitage Blanc or Châteauneuf-du-Pape Blanc.

So if you love flinty, subtle riesling wines as I do, drink some serious dry Mosel, which many of the better Spanish restaurants carry nowadays. Don't try Spanish riesling, please. Then again, you wouldn't drink local riesling in Tuscany, would you?

OTOH, I'll be glad to give you a few names of truly top level Spanish whites if you are interested in specific areas or food pairings. I don't want this post to be like a catalog...

Finally, on Somontano reds. There is, in the wine tasting vernacular, a difference between "full bodied" and "robust". Right-bank Bordeaux is "full bodied", not "robust". Corbières, Basilicata, Sicily or Collioure reds are certrainly "robust". I would indeed compare the style of Somontano, including Blecua, with Pomerol or Saint-Emilion, thus "full bodied". Secastilla, which you mention, is a peculiar Somontano, away from the current mainstream wines in the region - it's a (single-vineyard) grenache varietal, whereas the rest of the region's reds are basically cabernet sauvignon/merlot blends. But in the world of Spanish grenache it still stands out as a high-altitude, fresher wine.


Victor de la Serna

elmundovino

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the truth is for white wines, the Spanish are far more limited in choice than the French. Hopefully the Spanish will try to address this issue.

It's a matter of looking at the map, Judith. Spain is where it is. The viticultural areas in this country enjoy, overall, the most hours of sunshine and the highest daytime temperature averages in the world - Australia included. This makes a large majority of those areas ill-equipped to produce top-notch white wines, which need a temperate or even cool environment to preserve delicacy and subtlety. Rheingau, Loire, Friuli or Côte-de-Beaune this ain't. And that is not going to change. Add global warming, and it may even get more pronounced.

We do have some very interesting areas - the Galician northwest, the high plateau of Rueda, some cool high-altitude sites in Navarre and Catalonia. And we can probably do better in some other, warmer areas that are conducive to fat, garrigue-infused, spicy powerful whites in the mold of the Rhône valley. But these will never be market-dominating styles, but rather niche wines for a specific set of dishes - something like well-aged Hermitage Blanc or Châteauneuf-du-Pape Blanc.

So if you love flinty, subtle riesling wines as I do, drink some serious dry Mosel, which many of the better Spanish restaurants carry nowadays. Don't try Spanish riesling, please. Then again, you wouldn't drink local riesling in Tuscany, would you?

OTOH, I'll be glad to give you a few names of truly top level Spanish whites if you are interested in specific areas or food pairings. I don't want this post to be like a catalog...

Finally, on Somontano reds. There is, in the wine tasting vernacular, a difference between "full bodied" and "robust". Right-bank Bordeaux is "full bodied", not "robust". Corbières, Basilicata, Sicily or Collioure reds are certrainly "robust". I would indeed compare the style of Somontano, including Blecua, with Pomerol or Saint-Emilion, thus "full bodied". Secastilla, which you mention, is a peculiar Somontano, away from the current mainstream wines in the region - it's a (single-vineyard) grenache varietal, whereas the rest of the region's reds are basically cabernet sauvignon/merlot blends. But in the world of Spanish grenache it still stands out as a high-altitude, fresher wine.

Dear Victor: My husband is laughing because someone more knowledgable than I has certainly made a remarkable case for understanding the limitations of Spainish geology for producing greater white wines. I am also attentive to your comment s about the Spanish whites that could imitate the great, fatty and spicy Rhone wines of France. These options have NOT been explored.

You have also educated me about the rigors of defining full-bodied vs robust reds. Your wine knowledge is impressive and I am humbled by your wisdom. I do however press my case for a decent, well-educated palate; I am duly impressed with your

remarkable insight regarding the wines of France, Spain and Italy. I am really grateful for your honest and helpful comments. I have learned from your input.

Now is this an important lesson for me, yes. For other eGullet members--they must respond. Thank you for your considered response. Thank you. Before I end my response I want to state my preferences for what I consider the best of Spain's white wines: Chivite 125, Clarion, and some of the Albarinos. You recommended in one past post, a 200 year old Albarino which was spectacular. Respectfully, J Gebhart

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You recommended in one past post, a 200 year old Albarino which was spectacular. Respectfully, J Gebhart

I must have missed this one. Can anyone provide a link as I'm sure this deserves to be read.

Judith, Spain may not be the greatest white wine producer in the world for all the reasons Victor mentioned, but I am pleasantly surprised as to the exceptional quality of many of the whites it does produce especially given the country's overall reputation regarding whites. Moreso, I find that the whites produced there are generally superb matches for the foods requiring whites especially fish and shellfish. My personal favorites are the albarinos and the verdejos from Rueda. I'm sure some of the specific wines you mentioned are worth trying and I will seek them out.


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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I'll concur on the potability of albariños and Ruedas and the bang for the buck they usually provide. Let's not forget the Manzanillas from Sanlucar de Barrameda which I've found to be great with simple seafood and shellfish and the wines from Jerez which are often surprisingly good with food, although I'm dependent on others for suggesting the pairings beyond gambas and Manzanilla.

I will add that for those who wish to enjoy dining on a budget, wine lists in Spain offer a far lower entry point than they do in similar classes of restaurants in France although I suspect that may be changing, especially as sommeliers recommend French wines and as international gastronomic travel is deflected from France to Spain.


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I am also attentive to your  comments about the Spanish whites that could imitate the great, fatty and spicy Rhone wines of France. These options have NOT been explored.

"Imitation" is not a nice word... "Likeness" would be more like it. Remember that some of us have always mantained that the Rhône valley doesn't really stop at Avignon, but is prolonged by the hillside vineyards of the Languedoc, the Roussillon and Eastern Spain. We are much more southerly here, but we are also much higher up in altitude (I know a certain grenache vineyard 3,500 feet above sea level in my neck o' the woods), so one thing compensates the other...

In that sense, you already know one of those spicy, blended, Rhône-styled whites in Spain: it's one of the very favorites you mention. Viñas del Vero's Clarión is an excellent example of that syle, showing that, even if we can do better in variety and quantity terms, there are already a few good ones. Others (not easy to find, I warn you!) in that same league: Venta d'Aubert (Vino de la Tierra del Bajo Aragón), Remélluri Blanco (DOC Rioja), Clos d'Agon (DO Catalunya), Mas d'en Compte and Mas Igneus FA 104 (DO Priorat).

Your choice of Chivite 125 is also a sound one - Spain's best oak-fermented chardonnay. Close to Grand Cru quality. But pricey.

The wine from 200 year-old pre-phylloxeric wines I once mentioned was my friend Gerardo Méndez's Do Ferreiro Cepas Vellas, an albariño from the Rías Baixas DO. Late-harvest, late-release wines are often the best and most complex these days in that region, led by Pazo de Señorans Selección de Añada, Albariño de Fefiñanes III Año, Fillaboa Selección Monte Alto. Also Lusco do Miño, which should be cellared for 1-2 years after release (they release it early) and then gains considerable weight.

Best Rueda verdejos currently on the market (2003 vintage) are Naia, Viña Clavidor, Señorío de Garci Grande, Prius de Moraña and Palacio de Bornos.


Victor de la Serna

elmundovino

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Thank you Victor for your specific recommendations as the albarinos and verdejos are amongst my favorite whites at the moment. I will have to seek out the ones you have mentioned. I see that the albarino was from 200 year old vines. That makes sense. While I don't know how a 200 year old albarino wine would taste, I doubt it would be particularly good. :laugh:


John Sconzo, M.D. aka "docsconz"

"Remember that a very good sardine is always preferable to a not that good lobster."

- Ferran Adria on eGullet 12/16/2004.

Docsconz - Musings on Food and Life

Slow Food Saratoga Region - Co-Founder

Twitter - @docsconz

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I am also attentive to your  comments about the Spanish whites that could imitate the great, fatty and spicy Rhone wines of France. These options have NOT been explored.

"Imitation" is not a nice word... "Likeness" would be more like it. Remember that some of us have always mantained that the Rhône valley doesn't really stop at Avignon, but is prolonged by the hillside vineyards of the Languedoc, the Roussillon and Eastern Spain. We are much more southerly here, but we are also much higher up in altitude (I know a certain grenache vineyard 3,500 feet above sea level in my neck o' the woods), so one thing compensates the other...

In that sense, you already know one of those spicy, blended, Rhône-styled whites in Spain: it's one of the very favorites you mention. Viñas del Vero's Clarión is an excellent example of that syle, showing that, even if we can do better in variety and quantity terms, there are already a few good ones. Others (not easy to find, I warn you!) in that same league: Venta d'Aubert (Vino de la Tierra del Bajo Aragón), Remélluri Blanco (DOC Rioja), Clos d'Agon (DO Catalunya), Mas d'en Compte and Mas Igneus FA 104 (DO Priorat).

Your choice of Chivite 125 is also a sound one - Spain's best oak-fermented chardonnay. Close to Grand Cru quality. But pricey.

The wine from 200 year-old pre-phylloxeric wines I once mentioned was my friend Gerardo Méndez's Do Ferreiro Cepas Vellas, an albariño from the Rías Baixas DO. Late-harvest, late-release wines are often the best and most complex these days in that region, led by Pazo de Señorans Selección de Añada, Albariño de Fefiñanes III Año, Fillaboa Selección Monte Alto. Also Lusco do Miño, which should be cellared for 1-2 years after release (they release it early) and then gains considerable weight.

Best Rueda verdejos currently on the market (2003 vintage) are Naia, Viña Clavidor, Señorío de Garci Grande, Prius de Moraña and Palacio de Bornos.

Victor your suggestions are truly appreciated and certainly informed. We know Remelluri but not the Blanco. We know the Mas Igneus but not the white. We know the Clos Agon white but Peter S. of Pingus ended his influence with Clos Agon in late 1999. All 2000 Clos Agon were no longer reflecting the Pingus fingerprints. At least that has been our experience.

Your input about the many fine white options for the visiting diner is truly informative. For us, it is invaluable! My husband read your post of I think a year ago about the 200 year old wines. He was thrilled learn about them. Your list has added to our knowledge bank. THANK YOU. J Gebhart

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We know the Clos Agon white but  Peter S. of Pingus ended his influence with Clos Agon in late 1999.  All 2000 Clos Agon were no longer reflecting the Pingus fingerprints. At least that has been our experience.

I'm afraid it's exactly the opposite, Judith. My revered friend Peter Sisseck, of Pingus fame, became Clos d'Agon's consulting winemaker in 2000, after a change of ownership, and has overseen the viticulture (with some important replanting and vineyard reform) and the winemaking at this small estate in the Pyrenees ever since. His 2003 white hit the market last September. Total production: just 480 cases. It's a Rhône-style blend (46% viognier, 36% roussane, 18% marsanne) that was fermented in new and used French oak barrels and aged on its lees, in the same barrels, for six months.


Victor de la Serna

elmundovino

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We know the Clos Agon white but  Peter S. of Pingus ended his influence with Clos Agon in late 1999.  All 2000 Clos Agon were no longer reflecting the Pingus fingerprints. At least that has been our experience.

I'm afraid it's exactly the opposite, Judith. My revered friend Peter Sisseck, of Pingus fame, became Clos d'Agon's consulting winemaker in 2000, after a change of ownership, and has overseen the viticulture (with some important replanting and vineyard reform) and the winemaking at this small estate in the Pyrenees ever since. His 2003 white hit the market last September. Total production: just 480 cases. It's a Rhône-style blend (46% viognier, 36% roussane, 18% marsanne) that was fermented in new and used French oak barrels and aged on its lees, in the same barrels, for six months.

Well Victor you have informed us again. We were told differently by someone in the wine industry. Bad information for a wonderfully promising vineyard.

We adore Flor de Pingus; cannot afford Pingus. We have the greatest admiration for Peter Sisseck's contribution to the world of wine. I am absolutely thrilled that the information we received is wrong. With Sisseck contributing, for the 2000 vintage, we hope to enjoy ths marvelous white, complex, rich wine. We know his talent and his presence will guarantee a delicious treat. This is a marvelous blend and I only hope I can find it in Spain as well as in the USA. Victor, you have been invaluable for us on this forum. I hope everyone is equally appreciative of your wisdom. I thank you again. J Gebhart

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Hi All,

As we near our trip dates I am arranging all the great info I have garnered here. One thing I do not have but need is a great wine shop in BCN that I can shop at our last day for take home treats. I am looking for a shop with a wide selection of European wines as well as hard to find wines of Spain. Selection is more important than price.

TIA,

David


David West

A.K.A. The Mushroom Man

Founder of http://finepalatefoods.com/

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Hi All,

As we near our trip dates I am arranging all the great info I have garnered here. One thing I do not have but need is a great wine shop in BCN  that I can shop at our last day for take home treats. I am looking for a shop with a wide selection of European wines as well as hard to find wines of Spain. Selection is more important than price.

TIA,

David

I had some excellent advice from kind members about what to buy from Lavinia. You can try some of vserna's excellent wine and there is an excellent selection of wines from around the world. It's not the most atmospheric place but it's well worth a visit.

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