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Found 988 results

  1. Yes -- if its cheaper than the local korean grocery store.. its a good deal. Our local Korean store still has good deals on fish prices This is funny.. and true! Signs at your local stores????
  2. Monica Bhide

    Recipe Contest

    Best Asparagus recipe, Indian style. Inspired by all the discussion on asparagus in the India forum recently , I have decided to hold a fun contest. You will have three days to complete the contest. Only the recipes posted on the recipeGullet will be judged. Our very own eGulleter's Rajsuman and Tryska will be the judges. The winner will receive a copy of one of my favorite new books – The Potsticker Chronicles. The rules – 1. You will need to use asparagus as one of the main ingredients 2. Please post tested recipes. IF you can provide a picture even better 3. You will need to use spices listed here… using any of the Indian pantry items listed here -- Indian Pantry 4. Anyone in an “official” capacity at eGullet is eligible to enter but will not receive any prizes. Judgments 1. All judgments are final 2. Contest ends on April 15th 3. The winner will be announced on April 20th Please post your entries on this thread along with a link to recipeGullet. (Note – We may need an alternate judge if Rajsuman is unable to find asparagus!)
  3. Have a duck in our freezer, that seems to call to me, "Eat me, Eat me"... Have googled "recipes indian duck"...About a bazillion hits on Bombay Duck, which of course, is fish... A couple recipes for "Duck Vindaloo"...While almost any of gods creatures would indeed be enhanced by preparation Vindaloo style, I can't seem to find much else. Is waterfowl not popular in India?, or am I just not looking in the right places?
  4. Post questions for A Sampling of South Indian Breads here.
  5. I'd posted this question in an earlier discussion, but it got buried somewhere, so here it is again: What unusual things do you bring back from India? I've brought varak, copper vessels, the traditional butter-churner (mathani, even though I don't use it - mainly for decoration purposes), dried rose petals, bamboo shoots in brine, raw mangoes in brine.... Still on my list/wish list: Hyderabad ka potli masala, brass vessels, the black claypot my grandma used to make her famous fish curry in, surahi (a bit far-fetched I know), bharanis. Suman
  6. Post your questions here -->> Q&A A Sampling of North Indian Breads Authors: Monica Bhide and Chef Sudhir Seth Introduction These breads are the taste of home for me -- wholesome breads prepared with simple ingredients and simple cooking methods. There are many different types of breads in North India. They can be prepared in the tandoor (clay oven, as is done in many restaurants), dry roasted, cooked on a griddle, or deep-fried. They can be prepared plain, or stuffed with savory or sweet filling, or just topped with mouthwatering garnishes. In the recipes below we are merely attempting to scratch the surface, presenting you with a glimpse of these magnificent breads. North Indian breads are prepared with various kinds of flours. The ones listed here use a whole-wheat flour known as atta and all-purpose flour. The dough is prepared in most cases without the use of yeast. (We have shown a special sweet bread here, called Sheermal, that is prepared using yeast.) Also, the tandoori breads are generally rolled out by hand not with a rolling pin. But in the recipes below, for ease of use for the home cook, we have used a rolling pin. As you will also see then, no special equipment is needed. We have prepared the breads in a traditional oven and in a non-stick skillet. (We have included some pictures towards the end of the lesson of a roti being prepared in a commercial tandoor.) A few tips: • Knead the dough well, adding only enough water or other specified liquid to make the dough the right consistency. • A must for preparing these breads is to let the dough rest as indicated. This will ensure that the dough softens and moistens, making it more pliable and easier to stretch • To prepare simple ghee (clarified butter) see below but for a in-depth discussion check out this wonderful thread in the India forum. (See the last few suggestions on preparing it by melting butter.) • You can also purchase ghee or clarified butter at your local Indian grocer or from www. Namaste.com. Clarified Butter (Ghee) Yields: About ½ cup ½ lb unsalted butter Heat a heavy pan over low heat. Add the butter, allowing it to melt. Once the butter has melted, increase the heat, bringing the butter to a simmer. The butter will start to foam. Reduce the heat and simmer for about 15 minutes. Watch carefully as it may burn. The milk solids will start to settle at the bottom, and the liquid butter will float to the surface. When the liquid butter becomes amber in color, remove it from from the heat. Cool to room temperature. Strain the amber liquid into a jar and discard the milk solids. Cover and store, refrigerated, for up to 6 months. Plain Naan Dough Naans are traditional Indian breads prepared in clay ovens or tandoors. They are commonplace on most Indian menus. We have tried here to present a simple dough for Naans and then two of the more unusual preparations for it: the Peshawari Naan and the Onion Kulcha. . • ½ cup milk • 1 teaspoon sugar • 1 cup warm water • 1 tablespoon yogurt • 1 egg • 4 cups of all-purpose flour (labelled "maida" in Indian grocery store) • 1 teaspoon salt • 1 teaspoon baking powder • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil (for baking tray) • 2 tablespoons clarified butter or ghee In a bowl whisk together the milk, sugar, water, yogurt and egg. Place the flour, salt and baking powder in a large shallow bowl. Mix well. Pour the liquid onto the flour and begin to knead. Continue kneading until you have a soft dough. If you need more liquid, add a few tablespoons of warm water. Knead for at least 10 minutes, or until you have a soft dough that is not sticky. Oil the dough. Cover the dough with a damp cloth and place in a warm place for 1½ - 2 hours, or until the dough has doubled in volume. Directions for plain naan: Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Lightly grease a large, heavy baking tray and set aside. Lightly dust the rolling surface and rolling pin with flour. Knead the dough again on the floured surface for about 5 minutes. Divide it into 8 equal pieces and cover with a damp towel or plastic wrap. Roll each piece into a ball and flatten it with your hands. Using a rolling pin, roll it out into an oval shape (about 8 inches). Using your hands, pull at both ends of the oval to stretch it a little. Continue until you have made 8 naans. Brush each oval with clarified butter. Place the naans on the baking sheet bake for 5 minutes. Turn on the broiler and broil for an additional 3 minutes or until golden brown. Peshawari Naan In this delightfully sinful recipe, the naan dough is stuffed with dried nuts and raisins and baked. Serve this warm right out of the oven for the best taste. 1 recipe prepared plain naan dough For the stuffing: • 1 tablespoon cashews (crushed) • 1 tablespoon almonds (crushed) • 1+1 tablespoons pistachios (crushed) • 1 tablespoon raisins • 1 teaspoon cilantro leaves, minced • 1 teaspoon sugar • 1 tablespoon Milk Mawa Powder (Dried whole milk powder) • 1 teaspoon fennel seeds, ground • 3 tablespoons melted butter or clarified butter Prepare the Naan dough. While the dough is resting, prepare the filling. Set aside 1 tablespoon of pistachios and the raisins. In a mixing bowl combine all the other filling ingredients. Add a few tablespoons of water to bind them together to form a lumpy consistency. Roll the dough into a log. Cut into 8 equal portions. Lightly dust the rolling surface with flour. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Lightly grease a large, heavy baking tray and set aside. Lightly oil or flour your hands. Take one portion of the dough and roll into a ball between the palms of your hands. Flatten the ball. Place it on the floured surface. Use a rolling pin to roll it out into a circle about 5 - 6 inches in diameter. Add a tablespoon of the filling to the center. Bring the sides together and pinch them to seal and form a ball. Flatten lightly. Dust very lightly with flour. Roll the flattened ball again on a lightly floured surface until about 5 - 6 inches in diameter. Garnish with the reserved pistachios and raisins. Continue until you have made 8 naans. Brush each naan with clarified butter. Place the naans on the baking sheet and bake for 5 minutes. Turn on the broiler and broil for an additional 3 minutes or until golden brown. Serve hot. Onion Kulcha We present this recipe by popular demand. Here the naan is stuffed with a spiced onion mix and baked to perfection. 1 recipe prepared plain naan dough For the stuffing: • 2 small red onions, finely chopped • 1 tablespoon minced cilantro • 1 tablespoon Chaat Masala (www.namaste.com) • 1 teaspoon red chili powder • Salt to taste • 3 tablespoons melted butter or clarified butter • 2 teaspoons cilantro, minced for garnish • small boiled potato, grated (optional) Prepare the naan dough. While the dough is resting, prepare the filling. First, using the palms of your hands, squeeze out all the water from the chopped onions. If the onions still appear to be watery, add a small boiled grated potato to your filling. This will prevent the filling from spilling out of the kulcha. In a mixing bowl combine all the filling to form a lumpy consistency. Roll the dough into a log. Cut into 8 equal portions. Lightly dust the rolling surface with flour. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Lightly grease a large, heavy baking tray and set aside. Lightly oil or flour your hands. Take one portion of the dough and roll into a ball between the palms of your hands. Flatten the ball. Place it on the floured surface. Use a rolling pin to roll it out into a circle about 5 - 6 inches in diameter. Add a tablespoon of the filling to the center. Bring the sides together and pinch them to seal and form a ball. Flatten lightly. Dust very lightly with flour. Roll the flattened ball again on a lightly floured surface until about 5 - 6 inches in diameter. Dip your fingers in water and moisten the surface of the kulcha very lightly. Sprinkle with a few minced cilantro leaves. Continue until you have made 8 kulchas. Place the kulchas on the baking sheet and bake for 5 minutes. Turn on the broiler and broil for an additional 3 minutes or until golden brown. Serve hot. Ande Ka Paratha This is a unique addition to your recipe collection. A mild and flaky bread, it is a small kid’s favorite at our home. Makes 8 parathas • 2 cups Indian atta flour (whole-wheat flour) • 1½ teaspoons table salt • 2+2 tablespoons melted butter or clarified butter • Water as needed • 8 eggs In a bowl combine the flour, salt and two tablespoons of clarified butter. Slowly begin to add the water, kneading the flour as you go. Make a dough, kneading for at least 10 minutes. The final dough should be soft and pliable. It should not be sticky or else it will not roll out well. Cover the dough with a damp cloth or plastic wrap and let it sit for 30 minutes. Roll the dough into a log. Cut into 8 equal portions. Lightly dust the rolling surface with flour. Lightly oil or flour your hands. Take one portion and roll into a ball between the palms of your hands. Flatten the ball. Place it on the prepared floured surface. Use a rolling pin to roll it out into a circle about 5 - 6 inches in diameter. Now fold the dough over itself. Take the folded dough and roll it around itself into a spiral. Tuck the end under. Do this for all eight dough balls. (This folding and rolling will make the paratha very flaky.) Now flatten the spiral and roll again on a lightly floured surface until about 5 - 6 inches in diameter. Heat a griddle on medium heat. Brush it lightly with butter and add the paratha. Cook for about 2 minutes, or until the bottom of the paratha begins to blister. Brush the top lightly with butter and remove from heat. Put the paratha aside on a warm plate. Grease the same griddle a bit and break an egg on it. Cook the egg sunny side up. Place the cooked side of the paratha on the egg. Press down gently to break the yolk. Let it cook for a minute. Brush the top of the paratha with butter, flip carefully and cook for another minute or two until the paratha is no longer raw. Remove the paratha from the griddle and place on a serving platter. Cover with a paper towel. Continue until all the parathas are cooked. Serve hot. Indian Bread Stuffed With Spicy Potatoes (Aloo Ka Paratha) This filled paratha is a very popular North Indian bread, served traditionally with homemade white butter and Indian pickles of your choice. • 2 cups Indian atta flour (whole-wheat flour) • 4 tablespoons semolina • 1½ teaspoons table salt • 2 tablespoons melted clarified butter or butter • Water as needed • 3 medium potatoes, peeled • 2 Serrano green chilies, seeded and finely minced • 1 tablespoon cilantro, minced • 1 1-inch piece fresh ginger root, grated • 1 teaspoon Chaat Masala • 4 tablespoons melted clarified butter or butter • A few tablespoons flour for dusting In a bowl combine the wheat flour, semolina flour, salt and two tablespoons of clarified butter. Slowly begin to add the water, kneading the flour as you go. Make a dough, kneading for at least 10 minutes. The final dough should be soft and pliable. It should not be sticky, or else it will not roll out well. Cover the dough with a damp cloth or plastic wrap and let it sit for 30 minutes. While the dough is resting, prepare the filling. Boil the potatoes in enough water to cover for about 15 minutes. Drain. Put the potatoes in a bowl and mash them well with a fork. Add the green chilies, cilantro, ginger root, and chaat masala and mix well. Set this filling aside to cool. Roll the dough into a log. Cut into 8 equal portions. Lightly dust the rolling surface with flour. Lightly oil or flour your hands. Take one portion and roll into a ball between the palms of your hands. Flatten the ball. Place it on the prepared floured surface. Use a rolling pin to roll it out into a circle about 5 - 6 inches in diameter. Lightly brush the surface with the clarified butter. Add a tablespoon of the potato filling to the center. Bring the sides together and pinch them to seal and form a ball. Flatten lightly. Dust very lightly with flour. Roll the flattened ball again on a lightly floured surface until about 5 - 6 inches in diameter. Heat a griddle on medium heat. Brush it lightly with butter and add the paratha. Cook for about 2 minutes, or until the bottom of the paratha begins to blister. Brush the top lightly with butter and flip over. Cook for 2 minutes. Remove the paratha from the griddle and place on a serving platter. Cover with a paper towel. Continue until all the parathas are cooked. Sheermal A sweet bread, it is one of the few Indian breads that uses yeast. Keep the dough in a warm place to ensure that it rises. You can increase the amount of sugar if you like a sweeter taste. • 1 packet dry yeast • 1 teaspoon sugar • ¼ cup water • 1½ cups all-purpose flour • ¼ teaspoon salt • 2 tablespoons sugar • 2 eggs (separate 1 egg and set the yolk aside) beat the whole egg and the white together • 2 tablespoons melted clarified butter or butter • Extra flour for dusting • Pitted cherries/raisins for garnish Mix yeast with the sugar and 1/4 cup water. Set aside until frothy, about 5 - 10 minutes. Combine the flour, salt and sugar. Add the clarified butter, egg and yeast mixture. Knead until a smooth dough is formed. (You may need more warm water.) Set aside to rise until the dough doubles in size. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Lightly grease a large, heavy baking tray and set aside. Lightly dust the rolling surface and rolling pin with flour. Knead the dough again on the floured surface for about 5 minutes. Divide it into 6 equal pieces and cover with a damp towel or plastic wrap. Roll each piece into a ball and flatten it with your hands. Using a rolling pin, roll it out into a disc. Continue until you have made 6 discs. Beat the reserved egg yolk and brush a little on each sheermal. Place a few cherries on the sheermal for garnish. Place the discs on the baking sheet and bake for 5 minutes. Turn on the broiler and broil for an additional 3 minutes, or until golden brown. Tandoori Roti We wanted to show how the tandoor is used to prepare breads. These pictures are of a special roti or bread, called Tandoori Roti, being prepared in the hot tandoor or clay oven. The basic recipe entails preparing a dough of whole-wheat flour. (See the paratha dough prepared earlier.) The flattened rolled out discs are then cooked in the tandoor until the dark spots begin appearing on the surface of the bread. Post your questions here -->> Q&A
  7. Hi All, I am working with BBHasin on a class for eGCI teaching Indian breads. ANy favorites that you would like to learn about?
  8. Monica Bhide

    Indian Wine tasting

    I am thinking of organizing a tasting of Indian wines paired with Indian food here.. what do folks think? This is a new distributor who is gaining a lot of credibility in the market place for Indian wines.. is there an interest?
  9. Episure

    Indian restaurants

    There are chains of Chinese, Japanese, Mexican, Italian, Jamaican restaurants( to name a few ethnic ones.) and whether you are a fan or not, the fact is that chain restaurants do a fair bit to promote that Country's cuisine. This ultimately benefits stand alone operators too as more diners become exposed to the cuisine. Why hasn't any Indian restaurant come to the fore? My guess is that the cuisine has to be doctored a little bit to give it broader appeal. Any thoughts?
  10. Suvir Saran

    Curry Powder

    If you are an Indian restaurant owner, chef or employee, could you please take some time and share with us what you know about the usage of store bought curry powder in your restaurants kitchen. Would you mind sharing with us what recipes you use it in. What role it plays in your kitchen. And where these recipes using curry powder come from. Thanks all!
  11. mongo_jones

    indian rums

    forgive me if this has been discussed before. rum is huge in india, especially with people in the armed forces (as we call the military). perhaps the biggest indian favorite: old monk
  12. For Christmas, I'm planning on buying my father a decent selection of Indian spices. He loves to cook Indian, but his spices are stale, to say the least. What spices would be considered essentials? Also - are there any that are nice to have but not absolutely necessary?
  13. Monica Bhide

    Lobster

    We have invited some friends for dinner over the weekend, I asked them what they would like to try... answer "Lobster, Indian style". Okay now I am stumped.. any recipes? cooking insights? anything? Help!!!!!
  14. Liz Johnson's current column in the Journal-News (Westchester) is devoted to Thali, and Indian restaurant in New Canaan, Ct. -- in a bank. http://www.thejournalnews.com/johnson/ Having been there twice recently, I'll add my vote and say that this place is Connecticut's answer to the best New York City has to offer: the only better Indian meal I've had in the United States was at Diwan, and there are some individual dishes at Diwan -- especially the tandoori duck in Cabernet reduction -- that are fully on par with the best Diwan has to offer (in fact this may be the best single Indian restaurant dish I've had).
  15. Kim WB

    freezing

    Over the weekend, I made a very delicious ( if I must say so myself!) Murgh Tari. I have some leftover raw ingredients, and I was thinking of picking up more, making a big batch, and freezing it. Is it possible to freeze a dish with the yogurt in it? Also, I am finding that I prefer the creamier yogurt thickened wet curries..anyone have a favorite vegetarian recipe that with that type of sauce? Is there a generic name for sauces that are thickened with yogurt? ( I am a beginner! ) Thanks in advance.
  16. Monica Bhide

    Indian Salads

    Hi all, we are having a huge dinner tomorrow night and I am stuck in a rut about what sort of salad to serve. The dinner menu has all sorts of fish, chicken and vegetarian recipes, all Indian. I normally do two salads, one with yogurt ( a raita of sorts) and one with onions (with vinegar and red food color )... I would like to do something different tomorrow night. Any suggestions? Maybe somehting with potatoe croutons and toasted sesame seeds Okay, I need to feed.. will be back in a few
  17. Hi. I was lucky enough to be asked to review Monica's Spice is Right Cookbook for the magazine internationalwoman.net and I found it very easy to follow, even for a novice like me! I grew up eating Indian food but it's not available where I live now, so this was a new thing for me to try but all the dishes turned out authentic. My question for Monica is....when are you bringing out your next book?
  18. Do you taste as you cook? Is the tradition of not tasting foods as you cook them just a part of Indian myth today? If you do not taste as you cook, how do you make sure your food is perfectly cooked and spiced? Is there a reason why you do or do not taste food as you cook?
  19. Suvir Saran

    Meethe Chaawal

    Does anyone ever make them? Eat them? How do you make them? Do you add nuts and fruits to them? Saffron and or Kewra? PS: Kewra is screwpine essence.
  20. Last night I visited Udupi Village in Montclair, being a decent expert on South Indian cuisine (I am originally from there), I can whole-heartedly say that the food is very good. I usually have only one place of reference (Jackson Diner, Queens, NY). I know the place is not called that anymore. Madras Mahal (NYC, NY) is also another place serves a decent dosa! The decor in the place was bright but not unpleasing. We ordered the Mysore Masala Dosa (excellent), Vegetable Uttapum (very good), Iddli (very moist, almost perfect). I must mention the Mango Lassi. It was excellent - the lassi in most places have a tartness from that cuts into the flavor, not so with this one, I guess they add more mango pulp, which makes it sweeter but again very good. I find that the place was not very crowed, either people in the area are not familiar with South Indian or they dont know about the place. I would suggest anyone looking for something different in Indian dining, try out this place. Also, this is not affiliated with the Udupi in Iselin.
  21. Suvir Saran

    Pilafs

    Pilafs (Pulao) - These rice dishes are synonymous with Indian cooking. Do you have a favorite kind? How do you make yours? WHat do you look for in a pilaf?
  22. Suvir Saran

    Lunch

    Where does one go to eat a good Indian meal at lunch time. What does one order? How does it affect the workday? Any different from the many other options one has?
  23. Fat Guy

    Indian Desserts

    Okay, I admit it, I just can't convince myself to like Indian desserts. At least, not based on the ones I've tried. I recently ordered a bunch of stuff from Surati Farsan Mart in California (which is temporarily closed on account of a kitchen fire, details at http://www.suratifarsan.com ) and I found most of it to be painfully cloying and one-dimensional. These are supposed to be some of the best Indian sweets around, though I suppose there must be better ones in India. So, what's the deal? Have I just not been exposed to good Indian desserts? Will somebody educate me a bit here?
  24. So does anyone know of good beef dishes they have eaten at restaurants from the sub-continent? Where did you get them? How were they?
  25. Anyone have any favorite recipes for Vegetable Biryani? I'm cooking for a large group and wanted some new variations, other then my usual recipe...
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