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FoodMan

Snainiya – Sweet Boiled Wheat with Nuts

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My six month old just got his first tooth. To honor the occasion, I made Snay-ni-ya. This dessert made of boiled wheat kernels , sugar, nuts and other flavors is traditional and served in Lebanon to guests when a baby gets his first tooth.

To clarify the name a bit. It is basically derived from the word for tooth (Sin). So, Snay-ni-ya roughly means ‘related to teeth’ or ‘tooth related’. If anyone has a better translation for this, please be my guest.

The main thing here is to get some peeled wheat. It can be found at any middle eastern grocery store and some health food stores. Regular wheat can be used but will make for a tougher and more…er…toothy result.

This is the peeled wheat

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This can be served at any temperature hot, warm or even fridge cold. I prefer it slightly cold or a bit warm.

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Snay-ni-ya

1 Cup pealed wheat

1 Cup Sugar

4 – 5 Cups water

½ Cup pealed almonds (halves or slivers)

½ Cup walnut pieces

1 Tbsp rosewater

1 Tbsp orange blossom water

- Soak the wheat in cold water for 12-24 hours.

- Drain the soaked wheat, place in a pot with the sugar and 4 cups of water and bring to a boil. Let it simmer for about 1.5 hours adding more water if necessary to keep the mixture loose.

- When the wheat kernels are soft and chewy, add the nuts and more water if necessary and simmer for another 30 minutes. Add the rosewater and orange blossom water. Taste and adjust any flavor (like it sweeter, add more sugar, want more flavor add more roswater….).

- The mixture should be on the ‘soupy’ side, NOT like a porridge. Serve hot, cold or at room temp.


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Did your child like it?


"You dont know everything in the world! You just know how to read!" -an ah-hah! moment for 6-yr old Miss O.

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Tili3 sinno w'firhat immo, w'bayyo khaf 3al khibzaat. :biggrin:

or

Kil "sin" w'into bkhair?

Looks great

Congratulations Foodman.


Edited by ChefCrash (log)

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Did your child like it?

Oh well...he cannot eat it. You need a whole lot of teeth to eat this. The dessert is traditionally served for visitors or family members and such. It is not meant for the baby to eat.

And thanks ChefCrash.


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Interesting, many people around the Mediterranean seem to have special-occasion foods based on boiled hulled whole wheat. It looks very much like a version of what's called "ashure" in Turkey, which is made at the end of the month of Muharrme (also called "Ashure Month" for this reason). Making the Turkish one is quite an undertaking - in addition to wheat, it also has dried apricots, raisins, figs, garbanzos, beans, almonds, walnuts (both peeled), as well as bits of still dry nuts and dried fruits on the top in some versions. Each must be boiled separately before the final combination. Women typically make very large amounts, and share it with all the neighbors.

The Armenians make a similar thing, a bit simpler, for Christmas, with almonds and apricots. And the Greeks make a dry version called "koliva" which is passed out at funerals, and on later gatherings to remember the deceased - the wheat is boiled, then set out to dry for a day to seal, after which nuts, raisins, spices, toasted flour and powdered sugar is mixed in. At least in some areas they seem to see a connection between koliva and ashure, because one Greek name for it is "kolivozoumi," or "koliva broth."


"Los Angeles is the only city in the world where there are two separate lines at holy communion. One line is for the regular body of Christ. One line is for the fat-free body of Christ. Our Lady of Malibu Beach serves a great free-range body of Christ over angel-hair pasta."

-Lea de Laria

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Is snainiya similar to samanak, Elie?

Samanak is another ancient dish prepared especially for New Year. About fifteen to twenty days before the New Year, wheat is planted in flower pots and from this wheat a sweet pudding is made. The preparation for this dish is elaborate.

(And congrats on cute little tooth. :biggrin: )

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Great info Sazji. It of course does not surprise me at all that many cultures around the region share a very similar preparation.

Carrot Top- No idea actually. Where is that quote from?


E. Nassar
Houston, TX

My Blog
contact: enassar(AT)gmail(DOT)com

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Carrot Top- No idea actually. Where is that quote from?

It's from the site on Afghan food posted here.

Everything sounded so delicious.

But when I stopped to really focus on the two "puddings" I realized that of course they would not be the same because wheat that is only fifteen or twenty days old is *not* likely to have such big mature kernels. :biggrin:

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But when I stopped to really focus on the two "puddings" I realized that of course they would not be the same because wheat that is only fifteen or twenty days old is *not* likely to have such big mature kernels.  :biggrin:

I've had an Iranian version called "samanoo," also made before Nowrooz. It's quite different for a couple reasongs - the sugar comes from the sprouted wheat. In that sense it's sort of a "malt pudding." Also the cooking time is long so what is left of the wheat kernel is quite broken down. It's dark brown.


"Los Angeles is the only city in the world where there are two separate lines at holy communion. One line is for the regular body of Christ. One line is for the fat-free body of Christ. Our Lady of Malibu Beach serves a great free-range body of Christ over angel-hair pasta."

-Lea de Laria

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the sugar comes from the sprouted wheat. In that sense it's sort of a "malt pudding." Also the cooking time is long so what is left of the wheat kernel is quite broken down. It's dark brown.

Amazing, what one can do with one single product like a grain of wheat. What you describe sounds like a rich almost-molasses- taste. Maybe like Indian Pudding but made with wheat . . .

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I love these traditions- I went to a festivity in Cairo once where they had all these special dishes made for when a baby is born- rice pudding and such. Congratulations!

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