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miladyinsanity

Seizing Chocolate

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I made a chocolate terrine last week.

Part of the recipe called for melting 8oz dark chocolate with a tablespoon (or two) of water.

I think it was the humidity (monsoon season) which made it seize. :sad:

So when I folded it into the whipped egg yolks for the terrine, it lumped. It's still yummy, but I'd like to figure out how to avoid it for next time next time.

It's never happened to me before, and I'm quite sure I didn't do anything different. Should I just not melt chocolate during the monsoon season? :unsure:


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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Ok I'll take a swing at this one....

The Reason chocolate seizes is because it is full of dry particals(very very very little water)...the only reason it melts is because of the fat, not because of water in it. Because there are so many dry particals, when you add a small amount of water to it there is not enough water to soak all the particals and then causes the seize...you need to add enough water to it so that each partical can soak with water and then it will become liquid again(this will be because maily of the water and somehwhat still because of the fat....try adding a little more water to it....

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Ok I'll take a swing at this one....

The Reason chocolate seizes is because it is full of dry particals(very very very little water)...the only reason it melts is because of the fat, not because of water in it. Because there are so many dry particals, when you add a small amount of water to it there is not enough water to soak all the particals and then causes the seize...you need to add enough water to it so that each partical can soak with water and then it will become liquid again(this will be because maily of the water and somehwhat still because of the fat....try adding a little more water to it....

Nice explanation -- I knew a little made it seize, a lot was ok, but this explanation made it suddenly become clear (at least for me) the process going on in there!


Cheryl, The Sweet Side

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Yes Thank you Robert ,always new things to learn here I love it !!


Vanessa

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More info on seizing chocolate and the various causes:

Chocolate Seize on Baking911


John DePaula
formerly of DePaula Confections
Hand-crafted artisanal chocolates & gourmet confections - …Because Pleasure Matters…
--------------------
When asked “What are the secrets of good cooking? Escoffier replied, “There are three: butter, butter and butter.”

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A good rule of thumb is to add at least 25% water.

So, if you've got 8 oz. of chocolate, adding 2 oz. water would be safe (4 tablespoons, not 1 or 2). If you wanted to cut it close, you might be able to get away with 3 tablespoons.

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A good rule of thumb is to add at least 25% water.

Spot on. If for any reason you wish to add somewhat less than 25%, then you can get away with it. Carefully cut the water into the chocolate (both at the same temperature). Don't even begin to overstir, if you do you will encourage the solid particles to stick together and form agglomerates, ie seize.

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A good rule of thumb is to add at least 25% water.

Spot on. If for any reason you wish to add somewhat less than 25%, then you can get away with it. Carefully cut the water into the chocolate (both at the same temperature). Don't even begin to overstir, if you do you will encourage the solid particles to stick together and form agglomerates, ie seize.

The recipe called for the water to be added to the chocolate, and then melted together, which was what I did.

This would, presumably, prevent it from seizing, right?

Because I didn't stir it until after it was melty.

I do understand why it seizes and how. I simply do not understand why it's happening to me all of a sudden, when I'm not doing anything different.


May

Totally More-ish: The New and Improved Foodblog

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